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Food words often misused


Fat Guy
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At least I can relate: Maillard reaction doesn't sound particularly good on a menu. "Maillard reacted duck breast."

Ok, I want to know which chef would put this on his menu. Anyone have any ideas?

Future Food - our new television show airing 3/30 @ 9pm cst:

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Chef/Owner of Moto Restaurant

www.motorestaurant.com

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Shrimp Scampi = Shrimp Shrimp

Actually, a scampo is not exactly the same thing as a shrimp, which is called gambero, gamberetto, etc. Scampi are actually prawns of the "lobsterette" type, and not really related to shrimp.

So, really, "shrimp scampi" is even stupider. It's like saying, "shrimp langoustine" -- which I guess is kind of like saying "chicken pork."

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as i'm sure you're all aware, "scampi" has become a name of a preparation consisting of oil/butter and garlic. i don't get too worked up over it, as it really doesn't confuse anyone.

also, even small things can be large. for example, some molecules are enormous compared to others. you might find a scientific-type saying something like "look at that enormous molecule". that's not an oxymoron. neither is jumbo shrimp. you an have relatively large versions of this particular animal. i don't see any reason why they shouldn't be called "jumbo". (unless they're not. :biggrin: )

Edited by tommy (log)
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Coquilles Saint Jacques  (Just plain old Scallops)

...and then on the menu without any mode of preparation !

Or is there an assumed method of preparation when so labeled?

But isn't Coquilles Saint Jacques a method of presentation, some sort of scallop gratin served in its cooking vessel?

At least I can relate: Maillard reaction doesn't sound particularly good on a menu. "Maillard reacted duck breast."

Ok, I want to know which chef would put this on his menu. Anyone have any ideas?

Good one FG!

Inventolux: Thomas Keller, Grant Achatz or you?!

"in lobster sauce." (Never been near a lobster.)

That means a sauce usually used on lobster. Basically, Lobster Cantonese is Lobster in Lobster Sauce.

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as i'm sure you're all aware, "scampi" has become a name of a preparation consisting of oil/butter and garlic.  i don't get to worked up over it, as it really doesn't confuse anyone.

Yea, okay... but that still doesn't mean it isn't stupid. And wrong.

Mmmmm... give me an extra helping of "squid seppia" please! :smile:

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I understand that "lobster sauce" refers to a style, rather than an ingredient, but still think it is misleading. "Lobster-style" sauce would be accurate.

Arthur Johnson, aka "fresco"
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as i'm sure you're all aware, "scampi" has become a name of a preparation consisting of oil/butter and garlic.  i don't get to worked up over it, as it really doesn't confuse anyone.

Yea, okay... but that still doesn't mean it isn't stupid. And wrong.

Mmmmm... give me an extra helping of "squid seppia" please! :smile:

it's not wrong if "scampi" is "american" for the preparation of garlic/oil/butter, which, i think it's generally accepted as being.

Edited by tommy (log)
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Barbecue instead of grill.

Tumeric instead of turmeric.

But my favorite is the local supermarket that keeps labeling its fancy lettuce mixture "mescaline." Man, I tried it and it didn't get me off at all.

Kathleen Purvis, food editor, The Charlotte (NC) Observer

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as i'm sure you're all aware, "scampi" has become a name of a preparation consisting of oil/butter and garlic.  i don't get too worked up over it, as it really doesn't confuse anyone.

Actually, it confused the hell out of me when I was in the US. Also, no Buffalo in Buffalo wings and something called "Beer" in the US was utter piss.

n.b. Those offended by the Beer comment should keep in mind that I am Australian and Australia is the origin of 'Foster's Lager', the ulitmate Piss-Beer.

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Lightly fried.

"Lightly fried, cooked to perfection."

Mesclun mix (mix mix).

"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

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Garden vegetables at least seems to distinguish between farmed vegetables and garden raised vegetables that were grown with more tender loving care. Of course most vegetables listed as "garden vegetables" are probably the accomplishment of some giant agricorp and do not come from a garden so the term is misused with the intent of deceiving the consumer. "Creamery butter" however is just redundant as far as I can tell.

"Jumbo shrimp" is just humorous because the word can signify both a particular seafood and size.

"Shrimp scampi" has become associated with a type of preparation, but you have to agree that was weird as scampi (prawns) may be prepared any number of ways. It may be commonly understood, but that doesn't exempt it from being considered a misuse.

"Coquilles St. Jacques" is the French name for scallops. When used to denote a specific method of preparation, it falls into the "shrimp scampi" classification. As tommy points out, after long misuse, words develop their own meaning.

Barbecue means different things in different parts of the country, and in different parts of the world. The best argument I've heard is that the US south appropriated a word that originally meant "grilled." Apparently the natives of the Caribbean used a word similar to "barbecoa" to denote the grilling of meat over an open fire.

Buffalo wings are not made from parts of the Buffalo, but there's a long standing tradition of naming food stuff for its place or origin. "Buffalo wings" may elicit some humor, but it's not a misuse in my opinion. "Swiss cheese" is far worse.

Robert Buxbaum

WorldTable

Recent WorldTable posts include: comments about reporting on Michelin stars in The NY Times, the NJ proposal to ban foie gras, Michael Ruhlman's comments in blogs about the NJ proposal and Bill Buford's New Yorker article on the Food Network.

My mailbox is full. You may contact me via worldtable.com.

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