Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Fried Calamari in a Thai Restaurant


Recommended Posts

Had delicious calamari today. Looked like onion rings. Had a perfectly crispy, grease-free coating. I was wondering what the batter was. Definitely a batter, not crumbs or cornmeal. Any ideas?

I love cooking with wine. Sometimes I even put it in the food.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Was it dipped in pureed calamari tubes that was mixed with rice flour and a touch of eggwhite?

Edited by inventolux (log)

Future Food - our new television show airing 3/30 @ 9pm cst:

http://planetgreen.discovery.com/tv/future-food/

Hope you enjoy the show! Homaro Cantu

Chef/Owner of Moto Restaurant

www.motorestaurant.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 8 years later...

Did Fried Calamari last night..

I soaked mine in some milk first, I found that the batch I did a day ago had a fishy taste, the milk soaking ( about an Hr ) got rid of that last night.

I then mixed 1 egg with about a large table spoon of Corn starch, S and P. Fried in canola oil ( a second fry oil from yesterdays tenderloins ) @ about 350F. It just didn't have the crispiness I'd like? I have seen mention of Potato flour used.

Any thoughts for that crispy crunch..other that listed above ideas?

Would you think a dry coating of cornstarch before the wet would help. This does puff up lightly thou.

Paul

Edited by Paul Bacino (log)

Its good to have Morels

Link to comment
Share on other sites

hold on you mixed flour into your egg mixture? I dont think that will produce any crispiness at all.

What i like to do is toss in seasoned cornflour or rice flour, then lightly beaten egg whites. I could be wrong but the oil temperature seems a little too low also (though when i fry i don't have a thermometer so i can't tell)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Any thoughts for that crispy crunch..other that listed above ideas?

Would you think a dry coating of cornstarch before the wet would help. This does puff up lightly thou.

I coat in cornflour AFTER dipping in a standard batter of flour & water. It's messy, but crispy.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The idea of mixing flour and egg come from an Asian cooking show, otherwise I, I'm in the 3 step idea D_W_D, usually. I'm going to revisit that way , thanks.

AS far as cooking temp, I think I better bump that to 375F . I have and IR gun and that's an easy way to get a ball park temp. I know I could do a test fry too.

Looking forward to trying again.

Btw anyone used.. just cornstarch?

Its good to have Morels

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Try mixing your flour with an equal amount of Texturas trisol (Trisol is a soluble fibre (powder) derived from wheat starch with a neutral taste and smell and is used in the preparation of frying batters and tempura. The result is a crunchy, oil free texture - even with the most moist of products). Only problem is that it only comes in a 4kg (8.8lb) tub.

Nick Reynolds, aka "nickrey"

"The Internet is full of false information." Plato
My eG Foodblog

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would think that egg would give the coating a heavier cake-like texture instead of the light crispy coating that you're seeking.

At the Italian restaurant that I used to work at, we would keep the prepped calamari soaking in milk until an order came through. When it was time to fry, the calamari was dumped in a pan with plenty of flour, shaken to coat everything, and then the entire contents of the pan was dumped into the fry basket. Give the basket a good shake over the trash to knock off excess flour and then it went into the fryer. The result is a pretty delicate batter like coating that I think you're looking for. The flour-egg-crumb method produces a much heavier and crunchy (as opposed to crispy) breaded coating. I've experimented with different flours/flour blends as well as baking powder for leavening and I'm fine with just regular AP flour using the technique detailed above.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...