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cricket33

What's Everyone's Favorite Beer?

223 posts in this topic

I must agree with those of you that like Guinness - my absolute favorite.

Although I live only about 5 minutes away from the Anheuser-Busch plant in Colorado, I do not like their beer.  For those of you that do, I apologize, but do have to admit that their fresh beer tasting on the tour isn't too shabby at all.  As for local brews, New Belgium and Odell's in Fort Collins are really excellent!

But isnt Colorado Coors Country?


Jason Perlow

Co-Founder, The Society for Culinary Arts & Letters

offthebroiler.com - Food Blog | View my food photos on Instagram

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I like Anchor Steam from San Francisco and Heineken.

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I like Anchor Steam from San Francisco and Heineken.

Anchor Steam has non-SF beer?

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But isnt Colorado Coors Country?

Yes, I believe you are correct...don't particulary like that either. :smile:

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Anchor Steam has non-SF beer?

Huh? No, I said it was from San Fran...


Edited by awbrig (log)

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Anchor Steam has non-SF beer?

Huh? No, I said it was from San Fran...

:blink:

I like Anchor Steam, too. I just always thought it was *only* from SF.

You're confusin' me, awbrig.

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But isnt Colorado Coors Country?

Yes, I believe you are correct...don't particulary like that either. :smile:

The company was founded in Golden, CO in 1874 and is still headquartered there. There was a great episode of Modern Marvels recently on the History Channel that chronicled the whole history of beer in the US, with the formation of AB, Coors, Miller, etc. Very interesting stuff.


Jason Perlow

Co-Founder, The Society for Culinary Arts & Letters

offthebroiler.com - Food Blog | View my food photos on Instagram

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I like Anchor Steam, too. I just always thought it was *only* from SF.

You're confusin' me, awbrig.

I gotcha now. Like as opposed to the Anchor Steam from Jersey... :smile:

I just said"from San Fran" because most of the previous posts were saying where the beer is from. But then again, not everyone is as smart as you... :raz:

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Matthew, awbrig's too nice to torture.

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Matthew, awbrig's too nice to torture.

That wasn't torture.

I seriously wondered if Anchor Steam was brewing elsewhere. I don't read the labels that closely.

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I thought you were being facetious.

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Victory Hop Devil, from PA, perhaps the best IPA made in America

Isn't there a 120 minute IPA and a 90 minute IPA produced out of Connecticut or Delaware that is suppose to be the shit??

Dogfish head Brewing from Rehoboth, DE, produces a 60-Min IPA, a 90-Min IPA and supposedly soon, a 120-Min. IPA. I have had both the 60 and the 90, and both are quite good, really riuch and full in the mouth, but I still think Victory Hop Devil IS the balls.


Rich Pawlak

 

Reporter, The Trentonian

Feature Writer, INSIDE Magazine
Food Writer At Large

MY BLOG: THE OMNIVORE

"In Cerveza et Pizza Veritas"

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Yards ESA from Philadelphia, on the handpump at McMenamin's Tavern in the Mt Airy section of Philly.

Victory Hop Devil, from PA, perhaps the best IPA made in America

Bell's Oberon from Michigan

Tremont Ale from Boston

Sly Fox Pils  and Gang Aftly Scotch Ale from Phoenixville, PA

Troegs Hopback Amber from Harrisburg, PA, on the handpump at The Standard Tap in Philly

"Victory Hop Devil, from PA, perhaps the best IPA made in America"

Just returned to from my monthly run for beer and wine and, lo and behold, the Victory Hop Devil IPA has appeared in our beer and wine store in Maryland. I picked up a six ($6.49) and will try it as soon as I can sit out on the deck in the SUNLIGHT and enjoy it. Thanks for the suggestion and can't wait to try it. I do love IPA's.

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MassMarket Canadian: Labatts

MassMarket American: Rolling Rock

MassMarket Lowball: Red Dog

MassMarket German: Warsteiner

Regionals: KC - Boulevard

Berlin - Berliner Kindl Weisse

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winodj, on your travels, drink lots of Budvar, Pillsner Urquel, and Hefewizen!

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Yards ESA from Philadelphia, on the handpump at McMenamin's Tavern in the Mt Airy section of Philly.

Victory Hop Devil, from PA, perhaps the best IPA made in America

oh god, you guys have McMenamin's back there now? I'm sorry.. :smile:

I'll put Diamond Knot IPA, brewed in Mukilteo WA up to your Victory Hop Devil anyday :raz: It IS the shit.


Born Free, Now Expensive

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Belgian beers....particularly Hoegaarden.

If you like Hoegaarden, you should try La Chouffe Golden. ooo la la!


Born Free, Now Expensive

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Yards ESA from Philadelphia, on the handpump at McMenamin's Tavern in the Mt Airy section of Philly.

Victory Hop Devil, from PA, perhaps the best IPA made in America

oh god, you guys have McMenamin's back there now? I'm sorry.. :smile:

I'll put Diamond Knot IPA, brewed in Mukilteo WA up to your Victory Hop Devil anyday :raz: It IS the shit.

Thankfully McMenamin's Tavern is no relation to the Portland, Pac West chain of brewpubs, but I'd still like to visit them whenever I get out that way.


Rich Pawlak

 

Reporter, The Trentonian

Feature Writer, INSIDE Magazine
Food Writer At Large

MY BLOG: THE OMNIVORE

"In Cerveza et Pizza Veritas"

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Harpoon IPA, brewed in Windsor, VT.

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Yards ESA from Philadelphia, on the handpump at McMenamin's Tavern in the Mt Airy section of Philly.

Victory Hop Devil, from PA, perhaps the best IPA made in America

Bell's Oberon from Michigan

Tremont Ale from Boston

Sly Fox Pils  and Gang Aftly Scotch Ale from Phoenixville, PA

Troegs Hopback Amber from Harrisburg, PA, on the handpump at The Standard Tap in Philly

"Victory Hop Devil, from PA, perhaps the best IPA made in America"

Just returned to from my monthly run for beer and wine and, lo and behold, the Victory Hop Devil IPA has appeared in our beer and wine store in Maryland. I picked up a six ($6.49) and will try it as soon as I can sit out on the deck in the SUNLIGHT and enjoy it. Thanks for the suggestion and can't wait to try it. I do love IPA's.

Just poured a Victory Hop Devil into a very chilled glass and it was outstanding. Thanks for the tip - probably would not have tried it otherwise. For those who like lots of hops as I do, it was well worth the 6 1/2 bucks. Will definately keep several sixes in the frig.

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Not to be a bastard or anything, but you should really avoid serving good beer in a chilled glass. As the beer hits the chilled (or "frosted") glass, condensation will occur which will dilute your beer and thus your appreciation of its flavor. In addition, the optimal temperature to taste a beer, while depending upon the style of beer, is invariably higher than the temperature of a chilled glass (the one exception being beers like Coors that you'd be better off not tasting). When you pour the perfect temperature beer into a cold glass, the result is a beer that is too cold to taste well. Beer tends to develop more flavour, and more complexity of flavour, at a higher temperature than what is usually served here in the US.

For what it's worth, and to give you an idea of what I'm talking about... optimal serving temp for strong beers (barleywines, tripels, vintage ales etc.) is between 55F and 60F, while you're best off tasting ordinary ales (IPAs, dobbelbocks, lambics, stouts, etc.) at between 50F and 55F and only the lightest beers (lagers, pilsners, wheat beers, etc) should be served at a refrigerated temperature (between 45F and 50F). General rule of thumb is that the higher the ABV, the higher the serving temp and vice versa. In any case, however, the lowest you should taste a good beer is at around 45F.


fanatic...

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I like highly chilled beers.

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Yards ESA from Philadelphia, on the handpump at McMenamin's Tavern in the Mt Airy section of Philly.

Victory Hop Devil, from PA, perhaps the best IPA made in America

Bell's Oberon from Michigan

Tremont Ale from Boston

Sly Fox Pils  and Gang Aftly Scotch Ale from Phoenixville, PA

Troegs Hopback Amber from Harrisburg, PA, on the handpump at The Standard Tap in Philly

"Victory Hop Devil, from PA, perhaps the best IPA made in America"

Just returned to from my monthly run for beer and wine and, lo and behold, the Victory Hop Devil IPA has appeared in our beer and wine store in Maryland. I picked up a six ($6.49) and will try it as soon as I can sit out on the deck in the SUNLIGHT and enjoy it. Thanks for the suggestion and can't wait to try it. I do love IPA's.

Just poured a Victory Hop Devil into a very chilled glass and it was outstanding. Thanks for the tip - probably would not have tried it otherwise. For those who like lots of hops as I do, it was well worth the 6 1/2 bucks. Will definately keep several sixes in the frig.

I dunno about that chilled glass thing; as a rule, it's not conducive to appreciating the beer. I find a chilled glass harshens most beers, gives them a metallic twist, plus the condensation that eventually forms will dilute the beer and not give you the beer as it was intended.


Edited by Rich Pawlak (log)

Rich Pawlak

 

Reporter, The Trentonian

Feature Writer, INSIDE Magazine
Food Writer At Large

MY BLOG: THE OMNIVORE

"In Cerveza et Pizza Veritas"

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Who cares if that's the way you like it?

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