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claire797

Using Lard in Pastry

179 posts in this topic

In Japan they sell it in these neat squeeze bottles (looks just like Kewpie mayo--hope no one confuses them!)

And what do they put in it to make it squeezable?

I have no idea!

I check on my trip to the supermarket :biggrin:


<p><strong>Kristin Wagner</strong>, aka "torakris"

Manager, Membership

<a class="bbc_email" href="mailto:kwagner@egstaff.org" title="E-mail Link">kwagner@egstaff.org</a></p>

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Also, I just found this article after doing a Google search and it explains things about the same as I make lard. "EasyFunSchool"  :smile:  (the site) has a better explanation than the other sites I looked at.

Easyfunschool.com! Absolutely priceless, and my new favorite website name...

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As far as lard is concerned, I don't know that much about the best means of making it.  If there's a lard expert out there, please enlighten us.  Nightscotsman has started us down the right path, but we need more info!

I'm not an expert, but I do make my own lard (mostly for use when I make tortillas.) The stuff in the store is awful. It's fairly simple to make, but takes some time. The main thing is to start with leaf fat. The new Joy of Cooking has a good piece on making lard that will get you started (p. 1069.)

Also, I just found this article after doing a Google search and it explains things about the same as I make lard. "EasyFunSchool" :smile: (the site) has a better explanation than the other sites I looked at.

I use a cast iron kettle and the hardest part is getting the first bit of fat to melt. After that melts and gets hot just keep adding more without trying to push things too much.

Yep, nix the store-bought stuff and either make your own, which I've done, or purchase it from an accomodating butcher. We have many Hispanic mercados in these parts, and I've never had a problem getting quality manteca from these establishments.

Good lard is essential for authentic refried beans, and does wonders for a pot of Mexican cowboy beans. I've used it in cornbread, as well.

claire797, those gingersnaps sound great. I wouldn't hesitate to eat 'em!


Edited by Xanthippe (log)

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I'm feeling much better about lard at the moment.

Bux, I wonder how much googling I'll have to do to find the minimum daily requirement for lard? I think I may have to google forever.

Nick, "easyfunschool.com" sounded very Japanese. I was disappointed to find that it was not loaded with Anime and other such wackiness. I didn't take the time to search for lard making tips as I am still very "Lard 101".

Torakris, lard in a tube is pure genius.

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In Japan they sell it in these neat squeeze bottles (looks just like Kewpie mayo--hope no one confuses them!)

And what do they put in it to make it squeezable?

I have no idea!

I check on my trip to the supermarket :biggrin:

I am back from the supermarket, bought some lard.

It is made by Snowbrand (a major milk/butter/cheese company in Japan), the ingredients list pork fat and oxidation prevention medicine (I am sure there is an English word for this but i am going blank so that is the direct translation. It has Vitamin E in parantheses.

Here is a picture:

http://www003.upp.so-net.ne.jp/beginner_so...mg/lab/1_03.jpg

this was the only picture I could find, the reason it is in the pot is because he was melting it to make soap? I didn't read the whole website..................


<p><strong>Kristin Wagner</strong>, aka "torakris"

Manager, Membership

<a class="bbc_email" href="mailto:kwagner@egstaff.org" title="E-mail Link">kwagner@egstaff.org</a></p>

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I have one chocolate chip cookie recipe that uses lard. I also use a small bit of it in my roasting pan when I'm roasting potatoes with the roast.


Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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Also, I suspect that anyone following a kosher diet wouldn't bother with any food brought into the office by another co-worker. 

You never know - there are lots of people who don't eat pork, and not just Jews. And there are lots of Jews who don't keep strictly kosher (and would eat cookies in the office) but definitely won't eat pork (e.g. me)

If I had eaten one of those cookies and you hadn't mentioned the lard, I would be really unhappy with you.

Morale of the story: always mention ingredients people might have a problem with, unless you know (for sure).

- S

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Also, I suspect that anyone following a kosher diet wouldn't bother with any food brought into the office by another co-worker. 

You never know - there are lots of people who don't eat pork, and not just Jews. And there are lots of Jews who don't keep strictly kosher (and would eat cookies in the office) but definitely won't eat pork (e.g. me)

If I had eaten one of those cookies and you hadn't mentioned the lard, I would be really unhappy with you.

Morale of the story: always mention ingredients people might have a problem with, unless you know (for sure).

How is someone supposed to know what other people might have a problem eating? I mean, some people -- crazy people, I know -- don't eat butter. Some people don't eat products that come from certain parts of the world for political reasons. Some people don't eat refined sugar. If I make a bunch of chocolate chip cookies and take them to work, should I provide a list of ingredients for everyone? No, that just seems silly.

In my opinion, if a person has certain dietary restrictions then it is incumbent upon him/her to inquire as to the ingredients before eating. This is pretty much standard practice among considerate vegetarians ("is there any meat broth in this onion soup?"), kosher or "kosher-lite" pork-free eaters ("is this a beef/kosher salami?") and people with food allergies ("was this cooked with peanut oil?"). If you have such a problem with pork that you would be seriously upset at eating a cookie prepared with lard, then my feeling is that you should ask before eating.

I would also like to add that I know a number of pretty serious kosher and vegetarian types, and they all usually provide their own food or ask questions before trying any unfamiliar food. Similarly, in the few occasions when they discovered that they had eaten something they shouldn't have, they rolled with the punches and shook it off... they figured that neither YHWH nor the Big Vegetable in The Sky was going to hit them with a thunderbolt for eating a cookie with lard in it by mistake.

That said, if I had prepared cookies containing lard and I knew you didn't eat pork, I'd try to tell you. If I didn't know, on the other hand, I don't think it's a requirement.


Samuel Lloyd Kinsey

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Also, I suspect that anyone following a kosher diet wouldn't bother with any food brought into the office by another co-worker. 

You never know - there are lots of people who don't eat pork, and not just Jews. And there are lots of Jews who don't keep strictly kosher (and would eat cookies in the office) but definitely won't eat pork (e.g. me)

If I had eaten one of those cookies and you hadn't mentioned the lard, I would be really unhappy with you.

Morale of the story: always mention ingredients people might have a problem with, unless you know (for sure).

- S

Fish,

Again, had my co-workers (all 3 of them!) been vegans or Kosher, I would have mentioned it right away. That said, I would have no problem whatsoever putting any leftover cookies in the break room for anyone wandering by who was hungry for cookies. And NO! I would not put a sign saying "Warning: Cookies contain lard."

I believe that if you are trying to follow any sort of special diet, especially a kosher or vegan diet, then it is your responsibility to ask if the cookies have any sort of things you might not want.

For instance, if I were a vegan I might say this:

"Wow! Thanks for bringing cookies. I'd love to try one, but as you know I don't eat butter, eggs or milk. Are those vegan cookies? No? Well, thanks anyway."

If I were trying to keep Kosher I might say this:

"Wow! Thanks for bringing cookies. I'd love to try one, but as you know I don't eat anything unless it comes from a Kosher kitchen. Is your kitchen Kosher? No? Well, thanks anyway."

I guess what you're saying is that you (an, um "sort of" kosher) would not expect an innocent ginger cookie to be made with pork fat. Here's a script for you:

"Wow! Thanks for bringing cookies! Some chick on this food website I frequent made cookies with lard. I don't eat anything with lard since I avoid pork. I'm sure your cookies don't have lard, so I'm going to enjoy one. Thanks!

At that point, your co-workers script might be.

"Wow! What sort of demented person would cook with lard? Of course my cookies are made with Duncan Hines's finest cookie mix. Please help yourself."

At which point you could eat a cookie and lay any blame for your dietary indiscretions on either Duncan Hines (whose ingredients you didn't bother to question because no one could understand what they actually were) or your evil, horrible co-worker who tempted you with cookies.

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Also, I suspect that anyone following a kosher diet wouldn't bother with any food brought into the office by another co-worker. 

You never know - there are lots of people who don't eat pork, and not just Jews. And there are lots of Jews who don't keep strictly kosher (and would eat cookies in the office) but definitely won't eat pork (e.g. me)

If I had eaten one of those cookies and you hadn't mentioned the lard, I would be really unhappy with you.

Morale of the story: always mention ingredients people might have a problem with, unless you know (for sure).

- S

Fish,

Again, had my co-workers (all 3 of them!) been vegans or Kosher, I would have mentioned it right away. That said, I would have no problem whatsoever putting any leftover cookies in the break room for anyone wandering by who was hungry for cookies. And NO! I would not put a sign saying "Warning: Cookies contain lard."

I believe that if you are trying to follow any sort of special diet, especially a kosher or vegan diet, then it is your responsibility to ask if the cookies have any sort of things you might not want.

For instance, if I were a vegan I might say this:

"Wow! Thanks for bringing cookies. I'd love to try one, but as you know I don't eat butter, eggs or milk. Are those vegan cookies? No? Well, thanks anyway."

If I were trying to keep Kosher I might say this:

"Wow! Thanks for bringing cookies. I'd love to try one, but as you know I don't eat anything unless it comes from a Kosher kitchen. Is your kitchen Kosher? No? Well, thanks anyway."

I guess what you're saying is that you (an, um "sort of" kosher) would not expect an innocent ginger cookie to be made with pork fat. Here's a script for you:

"Wow! Thanks for bringing cookies! Some chick on this food website I frequent made cookies with lard. I don't eat anything with lard since I avoid pork. I'm sure your cookies don't have lard, so I'm going to enjoy one. Thanks!

At that point, your co-workers script might be.

"Wow! What sort of demented person would cook with lard? Of course my cookies are made with Duncan Hines's finest cookie mix. Please help yourself."

At which point you could eat a cookie and lay any blame for your dietary indiscretions on either Duncan Hines (whose ingredients you didn't bother to question because no one could understand what they actually were) or your evil, horrible co-worker who tempted you with cookies.

Brilliant, claire797! You go!!!

And I've been meaning to ask: Is the cutie-pie avatar your daughter??

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I'd agree that it's my responsibility to ask what's in the cookies if I place any sort of restrictions on what I eat.

Of course, there are a lot of people who fall into the "don't ask, don't tell" category. :wink: And like it that way.

I remember when Oreos were made with animal fat. I never understood why they were so much better than Sunshine Hydrox. :hmmm: Then someone explained it to me.

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Brilliant, claire797!  You go!!!

Oh my, I don't think I've ever shot coffee from nose before. :laugh:

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Brilliant, claire797!  You go!!!

Oh my, I don't think I've ever shot coffee from nose before. :laugh:

s'kat, I don't know why you're laughing. I am dead serious.

Cakewalk, that is exactly my point. If you are following dietary restrictions, than you should ask what the ingredients are. Same thing applies to label reading. If you are trying to stay away from pork fat, your choice is to read the label or live in ignorant bliss.

Varmint, thanks to your input, I will be whipping up some lard biscuits in the very near future. Found a good recipe last night that calls for lard and White Lily flour.

Marlene, I've tried chocolate chip cookies with half butter, half lard. The cookies were good, but I don't think the lard made that much of a difference in the texture. Never thought about using it to roast potatoes.

Torakris, how do you plan to use your lard?

Xanthippe, you should make those gingersnaps and report back.

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s'kat, I don't know why you're laughing.  I am dead serious.

Cakewalk, that is exactly my point.  If you are following dietary restrictions, than you should ask what the ingredients are.  Same thing applies to label reading.  If you are trying to stay away from pork fat, your choice is to read the label or live in ignorant bliss.

Yes. Assuming personal responsibility is another step in the process of becoming an adult. Period. I do not look to others for the information I require to make certain choices, particularly the dietary kind; I read labels, I become an informed consumer, I ask questions.

Xanthippe, you should make those gingersnaps and report back.

As it happens, I'm picking up another order of lard from the butcher today, claire. I intend to make the gingersnaps either this afternoon or tomorrow. And I will report back . . .

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As it happens, I'm picking up another order of lard from the butcher today, claire.  I intend to make the gingersnaps either this afternoon or tomorrow.  And I will report back . . .

Cool. Can't wait to hear how they turn out. I think I may use the rest of my lard for french fries. Would pure lard work for french fries?

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Torakris, how do you plan to use your lard?

probaby in tortillas! :biggrin:


<p><strong>Kristin Wagner</strong>, aka "torakris"

Manager, Membership

<a class="bbc_email" href="mailto:kwagner@egstaff.org" title="E-mail Link">kwagner@egstaff.org</a></p>

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Torakris, how do you plan to use your lard?

probaby in tortillas! :biggrin:

You mean, your corner store doesn't sell tortillas??? Shocking!

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Torakris, how do you plan to use your lard?

probaby in tortillas! :biggrin:

You mean, your corner store doesn't sell tortillas??? Shocking!

Actually the store just a bit aways from me sells a pack of (6 inch ones!) for something like $2.50, I can travel a little farther and get a pack of 10 (6 inchers) for $4.50.

It is a heck of a lot cheaper to make them and they taste soooo much better.


<p><strong>Kristin Wagner</strong>, aka "torakris"

Manager, Membership

<a class="bbc_email" href="mailto:kwagner@egstaff.org" title="E-mail Link">kwagner@egstaff.org</a></p>

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As it happens, I'm picking up another order of lard from the butcher today, claire.  I intend to make the gingersnaps either this afternoon or tomorrow.  And I will report back . . .

Cool. Can't wait to hear how they turn out. I think I may use the rest of my lard for french fries. Would pure lard work for french fries?

Some of the best french fries I've ever tasted were done in pure lard. Seems as though that's the preferred lipid of choice out in Iowa.

Go for it . . .

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Claire, you crack me up!

I believe Mc Donnalds used to use pure lard for their fries.

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I believe Mc Donnalds used to use pure lard for their fries.

I always thought they used to use beef tallow.


Samuel Lloyd Kinsey

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I believe Mc Donnalds used to use pure lard for their fries.

I always thought they used to use beef tallow.

What's the differene between beef tallow and lard? Is lard from a pig and beef tallow expressly from cows?

Xanthippe, I'm happy to hear you could really taste the difference in the lard fries. My plan is to try the fries on Friday night, so I'll report back.

Kristin, I am amazed that you can find tortillas in Japan. Flour or corn? Also, do you have to use a tortilla press?

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Kristin, I am amazed that you can find tortillas in Japan.  Flour or corn?  Also, do you have to use a tortilla press?

They are quite new to this country and normally only available at "International" supermarkets, they have both flour and corn as well as El Paso brand everything (taco kits, salsa, chiles, etc)

I make flour tortillas and roll it with a roll pin.


<p><strong>Kristin Wagner</strong>, aka "torakris"

Manager, Membership

<a class="bbc_email" href="mailto:kwagner@egstaff.org" title="E-mail Link">kwagner@egstaff.org</a></p>

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Food fried in lard does not absorb fat as much as if fried in vegetable fats. And it tastes better, like French fries.

Lard in pie crusts, not in cookies, was the way my mother cooked.

Catfish fried in lard, excellent.

If it's good lard.


Ruth Dondanville aka "ruthcooks"

“Are you making a statement, or are you making dinner?” Mario Batali

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Morale of the story: always mention ingredients people might have a problem with, unless you know (for sure). 

  - S

No. If you have dietary restriction for whatever reason, it is the responsibility of the individual with the dietary restriction (or caregiver of said person) make sure that dietary restrictions are not violated, or avoid food if no clear answer is given.

It is absolutely impossible to cover every possible restriction. Who'd know that if my daughter drinks diet pop, she'd probably have countless seizures? Who'd think that diet pop is dangerous to some people?


Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"

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