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Your favorite hot/spicy snack?

79 posts in this topic

Wasabi peas.

Yes, yes, yes! I can chomp my way through an entire bag in no time flat . . .

They're great. I sometimes mix them into cooked gohan.

????? :blink:


<p><strong>Kristin Wagner</strong>, aka "torakris"

Manager, Membership

<a class="bbc_email" href="mailto:kwagner@egstaff.org" title="E-mail Link">kwagner@egstaff.org</a></p>

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Wasabi peas.

Yes, yes, yes! I can chomp my way through an entire bag in no time flat . . .

They're great. I sometimes mix them into cooked gohan.

????? :blink:

Yes. Not something I'd serve but something I sometimes eat.

Great for the bit of crispy rice left in the rice cookers (I usually use three 20 cup cookers). Sometimes I'll fry the crusts and salt them. Sometimes I'll just mix it with tea.

But a small bowl of crispy rice and rice and wasabi peas makes a nice nosh.


"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

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Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

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Wasabi peas.

Yes, yes, yes! I can chomp my way through an entire bag in no time flat . . .

They're great. I sometimes mix them into cooked gohan.

????? :blink:

Kristen,

Gohan is the Japanese word for rice.

;P

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Where do you find the wasabi peas, s'kat?  I'm all for more wasabi-goodness!!!  :biggrin:

And do report back on the savina-laced nuts after tonight's BBQ . . .

I get the wasabi peas & peanuts from a local cheese shoppe, but I first experienced their bliss from a little North Carolina gem called Try My Nuts.

Unfortunately, in our rush to leave last night, we forget the savina nuts. Nuts. :angry:

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Where do you find the wasabi peas, s'kat?  I'm all for more wasabi-goodness!!!  :biggrin:

And do report back on the savina-laced nuts after tonight's BBQ . . .

I get the wasabi peas & peanuts from a local cheese shoppe, but I first experienced their bliss from a little North Carolina gem called Try My Nuts.

Unfortunately, in our rush to leave last night, we forget the savina nuts. Nuts. :angry:

Perhaps you forgot the savina nuts on purpose, s'kat! Now you don't have to share 'em!! :wink:

Gotta check out Try My Nuts, if only because the name's so gosh-darned, um, creative . . .

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Wasabi peas are my friend.

I do go through periods when I can't wait to get home and stuff some of my home-made pickled jalapeno halves with tuna fish and grated sharp cheddar with a little bit of mayo to hold it together.


Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

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I like a chewy ginger candy called ting ting jahe. Mom got it for me at a joyce chen store but now I reorder it online by simply googling ting ting jahe and picking one of the many online vendors that sells it because I can never remember where I last ordered it from. It's very spicy and wrapped in paper. Its ingredients are sugar, maltose, ginger, and starch.

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I do go through periods when I can't wait to get home and stuff some of my home-made pickled jalapeno halves with tuna fish and grated sharp cheddar with a little bit of mayo to hold it together.

If I love Mexican canned jalapenos rellenos, which I do (my two favorites are tuna-stuffed and the sardine-stuffed), I know your version would be far and away superior, fifi. I'll have to try it! Thanks for the suggestion . . .

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Tandoori Chicken Wings at my place

Roasted lentil crackers (papad) with cracked black pepper or with green chillies and garlic


Bombay Curry Company

3110 Mount Vernon Avenue, Alexandria, VA 22305. 703. 836-6363

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Arlington, Virginia

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I like a chewy ginger candy called ting ting jahe.

Yes, yes. I get these 3 bags at a time in Flushing, Queens or Manhattan's Chinatown. I especially like them as cough-drop substitutes when I'm having respiratory symptoms. They are very good.

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Ting ting jahe rules! My challenge is to find snacks that my 3 teens (and the basically live-in boyfriend of my daughter while they're home from college) won't eat.

Wasabi peas are better than croutons in a green salad.

Mexican snack from Barbara Kennedy (?): Raw peanuts and garlic cloves fried in oil with chile powder and salt. Watch to ensure the chile powder doesn't burn. Excellent to build a thirst.

Hot stuff story: Went to a drinking-in-the-afternoon party several years ago. I was running a grill next to a woman who was drunker than me (stranger things have happened). Anyway - I had brought along a selection of my favorites, and they were brutal. I had taken the precaution of marking the bottles with skulls and crossbones..... So, of course, the really drunk guy says he can take anything.....

Luckily, the really drunk female grillcook kept the really-drunk-and-now-pissed-off-at-the-guy-who-brought-those-sauces from beating up the drunk male grillcook..... Saved! Hallelujah!

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I like a chewy ginger candy called ting ting jahe.

Yes, yes. I get these 3 bags at a time in Flushing, Queens or Manhattan's Chinatown. I especially like them as cough-drop substitutes when I'm having respiratory symptoms. They are very good.

Yeah, I eat them too when I get tired of popping those menthol drops!

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Favorite easily available spicy snack: Spicy Hot Nuts (peanuts coated in extremely spicy seasonings), a messy and inelegant food. I can only eat a handful or two.

Wasabi peas are tasty, too.

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Kimchi bap (kimchi and rice rolled in nori).

Dinner tonight :wub:

I really love Habernaro stuffed olives.


I'm a NYC expat. Since coming to the darkside, as many of my freinds have said, I've found that most good things in NYC are made in NJ.

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Hot wings would have to be my favorite hot/spicy snack. I must say I don't just crave hot spicy foods often. These wasabi peas everyone is talking about sound good though... I might have to go pea hunting.

---- Appended

After reading a different forum, I realized I have another spicy food favorite. My mom makes these 'beef rollups' she calls them where she takes a packet of that thinly sliced beef you usually use for chipped beef and gravy, and spreads a mixture of creamcheese, horseradish, red pepper, garlic and whatever spice strikes her fancy, then rols them up like an eggroll. Sometimes they're on the mild side, sometimes quite spicy... I imagine they'd be great with wasabi instead of horseradis as well.


Edited by Gastro (log)

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I like a chewy ginger candy called ting ting jahe.  Mom got it for me at a joyce chen store but now I reorder it online by simply googling ting ting jahe and picking one of the many online vendors that sells it because I can never remember where I last ordered it from.  It's very spicy and wrapped in paper.  Its ingredients are sugar, maltose, ginger, and starch.

I would kill to know how to make these!

Welcome Gastro!


Edited by elyse (log)

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Favorite easily available spicy snack: Spicy Hot Nuts (peanuts coated in extremely spicy seasonings), a messy and inelegant food. I can only eat a handful or two.

No can of Spicy Nuts is safe when I'm around... I can eat an embarrasing number of handfuls of these things.

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I like a chewy ginger candy called ting ting jahe.  Mom got it for me at a joyce chen store but now I reorder it online by simply googling ting ting jahe and picking one of the many online vendors that sells it because I can never remember where I last ordered it from.  It's very spicy and wrapped in paper.  Its ingredients are sugar, maltose, ginger, and starch.

I would kill to know how to make these!

Why make them when you can buy them for $1.29 or so in Flushing and about 10 cents more per bag in Chinatown?

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Why, to be cool, Pan. :biggrin:

I don't get downtown as much as I used to.

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You're right!

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Spicy cashews from an Indian store - the cashews are sweet and the spices are tangy - sour, spicy and hot.

You can make these so easilly at home.

1. Get a great big jar of cashews from Costco.

2. At home, heat a karhai (Indian version fo the wok).

3. Put a couple of sppons of ghee (clarified butter) in the karhai.

4. When the ghee is a little hot, but not smoking, throw in some garam masala, black pepper and red cilli powder.

5. When the spices have just cooked (they kinda rise to the surface of the ghee and almost foam), put the cahshews in and start mixing them in the masala.

6. Sprinkle salt on top, lower the heat to medium and stir the cashews until they are nicely coated and are hot to touch.

7. Some of cashews will get a bit charred in the process, but that just makes them oh-so-much-better.

8. When they are nicely done, take them out and put them in one layer on a cookies sheet.

9. Cool them thoroughly before you put them back in the jar.

Quite frankly, if they are not crunchy and tastey enough for you, just throw them back in the wok and fix them.

This is super easy and such a crowd pleaser - they are so good with sweetish drinks like cosmos :)

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PCircles,

sounds great!

welcome to egullet!


<p><strong>Kristin Wagner</strong>, aka "torakris"

Manager, Membership

<a class="bbc_email" href="mailto:kwagner@egstaff.org" title="E-mail Link">kwagner@egstaff.org</a></p>

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YUM! And welcome!

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i love jalapeño poppers.


"He who distinguishes the true savour of his food can never be a glutton; he who does not cannot be otherwise."

Thoreau

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