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Kim WB

Time Life "Foods of the World" series

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Hm, well the booklet has more recipes than the main book. I have only the main book for the Italy volume. I'll look later assuming David doesn't get a chance to answer my question.

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There is a recipe for a pizza dough in the hardcover book. Unfortunately the spiral-bound is missing from my collection. We will have to await David Ross's response to be certain that this is the recipe he uses. The recipe I am referring to is on page 172 of the hardcover.

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The identical recipes are in both: Page 16 of the booklet and page 172 of the hardcover

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It's on page 172 of the main hard-cover book.  The recipe is just titled "Pizza" rather than pizza dough.  Oddly, they call for either all-purpose flour or "granulated flour," which I've never heard of.  I used King Arthur bread flour, which supposedly is a high-protein flour similar to the protein content in some Italian 00 flours.  Also interesting is the recipe calls for quite a lot of olive oil, 3/4 cup.  Most of the modern recipes I've seen for pizza dough don't call for any olive oil in the dough itself. 

 

This is the great photo on the page opposite the recipe:

 

001.JPG

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Apparently granulated flour is Wondra or instant flour (thanks Chocolot). Seems strange to call for that. I was startled by the three-quarter cup olive oil but only one quarter goes into the dough. Still that is a lot.

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I attribute that to the availability of ingredients at the time.

 

Okay, thanks David. 

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I have 50 % of this series, and and all of the Good Cook

 

you can get all of these at ebay for 100 bucks:

 

http://www.ebay.com/itm/like/191148693469?lpid=82

 

the others one by one.

 

It surprises me that Time LIfe did such outstanding work back then on cooking and cookery

 

it really was outside the box.

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It surprises me that Time Life did such outstanding work back then on cooking and cookery

 

it really was outside the box.

rotuts! Not surprising when you look at the stellar list of authors, editors and consultants like Waverly Root, Michael Field, James Beard and M.F.K. Fisher.

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just so.  I have all of Waverly Root's books

 

Food of France

 

Food of Italy

 

these were exceptional books at the time.

 

Soooooooooooooooo ............

 

some editor at TL

 

Like to Eat  ?

 

where are they now !

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When I was about 8, my family went to New Orleans.  I didn't appreciate Antoines, etc. at the time.  My mother bought the Creole volume of Foods of the World.  I read it cover to cover multiple times.  I attribute my interest in food, at least in part, to that book that I read around age 8.

 

I just bought the whole series on eBay.  I hope it is as good as I remember.

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I bought the set one book at a time. Then the publisher offered to send the final four or five as a group.  My first winter in Iowa was fast approaching and having the books seemed like the ideal solution to cabin fever.. This was way back in the dark ages when money was very tight so it was a splurge  It was Birthday and Christmas combined when all of them arrived.  I still have them, faded spines and all and consider them some of the best reading around.  The sad thing is that my parents also had a complete set and in the heat of cleaning out their home, they ended up going to Goodwill.  I still pick up the odd book at thrift shops and yard sales.  There is always someone who will appreciate having it.

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So far I've only picked up their books on "Meat" and "Poultry". Not sure whether they're from the same series, but they're definitely Time-Life and definitely worth adding to my overswollen collection.

Welcome to eGullet, robie!

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Meat and Poultry are from a later series :  " The Good Cook "

 

Im lucky to have all of these and an addition 50 % of them in French.  yes they published a french edition

 

just goes to show you ....

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Good_Cook

 

http://www.ebay.com/itm/like/251524105482?lpid=82

 

and

 

http://cookbooksforchefs.com/


Edited by rotuts (log)

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image.jpg

image.jpg

We are currently at value village - the ones in the buggie are ours - anyone want up to pick any of the ones on the shelf ? $1.99 each

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if you love cooking, snap these up.

 

esp  the Terrine book.

 

BTW  you see any of the Foods of the World  etc   ...

 

I have about 1/4

 

Im really thinking of getting the whole set w Rx book at eBay foods of the world

 

they were instrumental, along w Julia Child  " the french chef"  Black and White PBS 

 

defining my interest in cooking.

 

its a bit of a story ........

 

next time your are in Montreal, go to the FR bargain bins and look for the FR version

 

its still called   " the Good Cook "  not Le bon etc etc 

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I've got the others already - just picked up what I don't have. The variety meats caught my eye as I know it's been discussed on eG

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Rats   I became a bit befuddled  that's a pre-Senior Moment

 

after it rubbled a bit in the brain, no way in the world would FR publish anything w a bit on Anglais

 

so i went back to the dusty area and Voila !

 

Hors d'oeuvre book was in the English series  Beet me what it was called in the FR series 

 

but i offer this :

 

CM.jpg

 

there are more somewhere  , ...

 

BTW  I brought the books by hand back from FR in hand baggage 

 

just saying


Edited by rotuts (log)

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One of my most beloved recipes from "The Foods Of Italy"  simply titled "Canneloni"-

 

A sauce made from canned San Marzano tomatoes, egg wrappers filled with a mixture of beef, spinach and chicken livers, a thick layer of besciamella, and dabs of butter and parmesan-

 

IMG_0180.JPG

 

IMG_0184.JPG

 

IMG_0189.JPG

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I also have made the Canneloni al Forno exactly using this Rx.

 

I did use veal back in my veal days. from the BOS north end.

 

mighty fine series this is.

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