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Onion Relish/Condiment


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I find myself wondering what people think of the onion relish you often are served in many Indian restaurants in the US.

Do people enjoy this relish?

Where does it come from?

What version of it does your local Indian restaurant serve?

Have you ever asked for a recipe?

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I find myself wondering what people think of the onion relish you often are served in many Indian restaurants in the US.

Do people enjoy this relish?

Where does it come from?

What version of it does your local Indian restaurant serve? 

Have you ever asked for a recipe?

:angry: I understand your concern on onion relish.

I am not sure people enjoy this, but there is a request from some guests.

No clue, where it comes from, after all it's made with ketchup and .....

I honestly do not serve, unless it's a demand.

Never asked a recipe but make my own. :wub::laugh:

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No clue, where it comes from, after all it's made with ketchup and .....

Are you certain that this is made with ketchup on the Indian restaurant circuit? I thought the red came from the same red food coloring that tandoori chicken is colored with. In fact, several Indian restaurants I have tried serve it without the deep red color, it's more yellow or orange and usually tastes the same as the red. I always thought it was onions, vinegar, chile, and spices. I like the stuff. When restaurants bring out a plate of pappadums gratis before dinner begins, I like to think of the pappadum as the tortilla chip, and the onions as the salsa. I also like mixing it in with the rice, and even with some curries, particularly strongly flavored and heavily sauced ones. When I ask for more (as I frequently do) I ask the waiter to bring me some more onion chutney - is this a misnomer? I suppose it is more of a relish, but I have been calling it onion chutney for more than two decades. As a final effront to the Indian sensibility, I have been known to even mix it into chaat. Call me gringo, but don't call me late for chutney! :rolleyes:

Edited by Haggis (log)
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I always thought it was food coloring and some spices. Never much cared for it.. have been known to enjoy it as Haggis mentions, with papad as a salsa and chip alternative.

I always ask for freshly (at least I hope they are) sliced onions and lemon. Make my own onions and maybe some chaat masala. Then I feel I am a true Punjabi... at least that half of me that is Punjabi comes out and is in heaven.

The other part of me really misses the Moti Mahal fame Sirke Waalee Piyaaz (pearl onions marinated in vinegar). I make these and keep them at home for when I cook food.... friends from India love the fact that I have these handy..... Always a great condiment to have for most any meal.

I have hear some servers tell me this onion relish served in NYC restaurants has its roots in Bengali cooking. Bengali friends I know claim no part of this... Can our Bengali members shed some light on this please... Is it true? Or simply a myth?

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The onion relish I make is from Mahur Jaffrey's Indian Cooking and she calls it pyaz ka laccha, this consists simply of onions tossed with salt, lemon juice, paprika, and cayenne.

This is very similar to the condiment I have recieved in Indian restaurants in Japan and the one ( :shock: ) Indian restaurant i have been to in the US. No ketchup in any of these.

Just last week I amde one from Jaffrey's Spice Kitchen book and although she gives the same name, this recipe includes, onions, tomato, salt, pepper, cayenne, white vinegar or lemon juice and mint leaves. This was also very good.

I love onion relish especially with rice or kebabs or other ground meat dishes, what is it normally served with?

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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The onion relish I make is from Mahur Jaffrey's Indian Cooking and she calls it pyaz ka laccha, this consists simply of onions tossed with salt, lemon juice, paprika, and cayenne. 

This is very similar to the condiment I have recieved in Indian restaurants in Japan and the one ( :shock: ) Indian restaurant i have been to in the US. No ketchup in any of these.

Just last week I amde one from Jaffrey's Spice Kitchen book and although she gives the same name, this recipe includes, onions, tomato, salt, pepper, cayenne, white vinegar or lemon juice and mint leaves. This was also very good.

I love onion relish especially with rice or kebabs or other ground meat dishes, what is it normally served with?

Kristin,

What you mention and cook from Madhur's books are what I and many others I know grew up eating.

In the US one is served a relish made of small dice onions that have a pink-red color and a sweet and spicy (dull) taste to them. Not at all like the Pyaaz Ka Laccha you mention or even the Tamatar Pyaaz Ka Kachumbar which you also mention.

Wonder where this relish we find in the US got discovered or created...

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No clue, where it comes from, after all it's made with ketchup and .....

Are you certain that this is made with ketchup on the Indian restaurant circuit? I thought the red came from the same red food coloring that tandoori chicken is colored with. In fact, several Indian restaurants I have tried serve it without the deep red color, it's more yellow or orange and usually tastes the same as the red. I always thought it was onions, vinegar, chile, and spices. I like the stuff. When restaurants bring out a plate of pappadums gratis before dinner begins, I like to think of the pappadum as the tortilla chip, and the onions as the salsa. I also like mixing it in with the rice, and even with some curries, particularly strongly flavored and heavily sauced ones. When I ask for more (as I frequently do) I ask the waiter to bring me some more onion chutney - is this a misnomer? I suppose it is more of a relish, but I have been calling it onion chutney for more than two decades. As a final effront to the Indian sensibility, I have been known to even mix it into chaat. Call me gringo, but don't call me late for chutney! :rolleyes:

Most good Indian chef's do not use red color in Tandoori Chicken. How ever your observance is excellent. the red in the onion chuney is the color.

In most of the the restaurants which represent Bangladesh or the cooks from the Bangldesh, instead of going thru some pains of individual ingredients they use the ketchup and it's sparkling good.

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