Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Indian Cooking Classes


prasad2
 Share

Recommended Posts

This is for every one of you.

Some one who wants to learn Indian cooking, where should they start? (Answer by Gurus)

Some one is a beginner, where do you wan't to start? (Answer by Beginners and Gurus)

As a beginner what would you expect to learn?

What is the length of time you are willing to give?

If you are aware of the Indian cuisine, what food items would you want to learn?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Most of my Indian cooking comes from books (I had Indian food for the first time at age 25!) I have taken two classes though, one just last week. These are my observations from the other people who attended the class who had never really prepared it before.

They need to to start off slow and simple, don't assume they know anything, most of them probably think everything is seasoned with curry powder! :biggrin:

The first couple dishes should use as few spices as possible and explain, talk about the spices, where they come from how they are used, etc to make the people more familiar with them. New spices can be scary.

DO NOT use spices that are difficult to attain, my last class the instructor used black cardamon, which I have never been able to locate in Japan, when I asked him about his source he says he brings it back with him when he returns to Indian, how are we to replicate the dish? He also used kasuri methi (which I started a thread about) and I agree it is a good spice to know, but should have come in a later class. The students don't want to go out and spend a fortune on stocking a spice cabinet that are not sure they will use too much of.

Cook a complete meal for each lesson, a rice or bread, a main dish or two, a relish, chutney or salad, a dessert or drink. This is easier fort eh students to prepare at home they can just repeat the entire menu instead of searching for something to go with a single dish.

Have them do as much hands on as possible, at my class we watched the instructor prepare the dishes then we all went to our stations (in groups of 3) and prepared them while the instructor walked around helping. Actually preparing rather then just watching can make a big difference in them trying it again at home.

Try to make at least on or two of the dishes something they maybe familiar with, something commonly on Indian restaurant menus, familiarity always works well well you are new to cooking a different cuisine.

3 hours is usually a good amount of time, including making it, eatingit, and cleaning up (if necessary)

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

prasad2, I would also like to add something to your question. If people have any recommendations for indian cookbooks for beginners, I would appreciate it.

Edited by ErinB (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

prasad2, I would also like to add something to your question.  If people have any recommendations for indian cookbooks for beginners, I would appreciate it.

Erin B

welcome to egullet!

there was a lengthy discussion of cookbooks a little while back,

look here:

http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?act=ST...adhur,and,julie

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Most of my Indian cooking comes from books (I had Indian food for the first time at age 25!) I have taken two classes though, one just last week. These are my observations from the other people who attended the class who had never really prepared it before.

They need to to start off slow and simple, don't assume they know anything, most of them probably think everything is seasoned with curry powder! :biggrin:

The first couple dishes should use as few spices as possible and explain, talk about the spices, where they come from how they are used, etc to make the people more familiar with them. New spices can be scary.

DO NOT use spices that are difficult to attain, my last class the instructor used black cardamon, which I have never been able to locate in Japan, when I asked him about his source he says he brings it back with him when he returns to Indian, how are we to replicate the dish? He also used kasuri methi (which I started a thread about) and I agree it is a good spice to know, but should have come in a later class. The students don't want to go out and spend a fortune on stocking a spice cabinet that are not sure they will use too much of.

Cook a complete meal for each lesson, a rice or bread, a main dish or two, a relish, chutney or salad, a dessert or drink. This is easier fort eh students to prepare at home they can just repeat the entire menu instead of searching for something to go with a single dish.

Have them do as much hands on as possible, at my class we watched the instructor prepare the dishes then we all went to our stations (in groups of 3) and prepared them while the instructor walked around helping. Actually preparing rather then just watching can make a big difference in them trying it again at home.

Try to make at least on or two of the dishes something they maybe familiar with, something commonly on Indian restaurant menus, familiarity always works well well you are new to cooking a different cuisine.

3 hours is usually a good amount of time, including making it, eatingit, and cleaning up (if necessary)

Torakris

That's a great start by learning from books. After taking classes by now I am sure you might have experienced the advantage of an interactive teacher.

I completely understand when you say start off slow and simple and thank you so much from an insight of a new student to this food.

I own a restaurant and have conducted cooking classes thru Adult continuing education. I have started this as an hobby and a promotion to the restaurant. Students have loved it and we sell out the 2nd day the brochure is sent out. I have typically started the cooking classes in the same fashion what you explained as what you would expect. The class was fun and informative and I ended up calling " Learn & Dine".

The class started with the introduction of few displayed spices and then roasted to make garam masala. Students found it very interesting. Then I usually handed out a complete meal with recipes and then we practised all the dishes.

Hands on! Yes, for cooking and not for chopping and cutting. This was again a lot of fun for the students since they got involved in cooking rather than watching.

As a bonus with dinner our wine manager came out and spoke a couple of lines on pairing food and wine and there we go learn and dine.

These classes are done on aregular basis. I have several requests for classes from our guests.

I would like to start these classes with five or six minimum sessions.

Name a few dishes you are interested in?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Name a few dishes you are interested in?

chutney, any kind

breads, any kind

dessert, any kind

these are the ones I am interested in the most becuse I already cook a lot of main dishes, and these are the ones I find it really helps to have hands on training.

The other I personally am interested in right now is saag paneer.

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

prasad2, I would also like to add something to your question.  If people have any recommendations for indian cookbooks for beginners, I would appreciate it.

Monica Bhide has published her own cook book Spice is Right, she can answer this better than I could.

Please see spiceisright

Actually I have not published it myself. It was done by a Canadian Cookbook publisher -- Callawind Publications and is being carried by National BOOk Network

If I can be of any help, just ask!!

I often do private classes so if anyone is interested just PM me

Of course, Suvir is known for his NYC classes

Monica Bhide

A Life of Spice

Link to comment
Share on other sites

prasad2, I would also like to add something to your question.  If people have any recommendations for indian cookbooks for beginners, I would appreciate it.

Erin B

welcome to egullet!

there was a lengthy discussion of cookbooks a little while back,

look here:

http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?act=ST...adhur,and,julie

ErinB,welcome to eGullet and the Indian forum.

The link above will take you to the link about books, but if you check the pinned thread (the very first one in the Indian forum), you will find it easy to get linked with some of the other threads that can familiarize you with content on this forum as also Indian cooking.

And please do not hesitate to ask all of us that participate on this forum and eGullet, any questions you may have about Indian food or any other.

Beginners are at the most amazing spot as far as learning a foreign cuisine goes. You can make of it whatever you choose it to be. There is nothing between you and what the natives can do. It is only a question of time, patience and desire to learn. Since you are in this forum already, you have certainly shown the desire, as you ask us (all the members that enrich this forum with their myriad experiences) questions, I am sure you will quickly find out how readily our members share of their own passions. You will graduate to becoming an experienced cook of Indian foods very soon.

Again, welcome to eGullet. :smile:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 months later...

I am approaching the dead line for my cooking class. The class is on this Saturday the 25th Oct, 03.

It is two hours of fun hands on cooking and an hour of dining with the cooked food and pairing a wine or two. I have 24 trainee cooks coming for the class.

Any more suggestions please, yes I am adding in Saag Paneer and also thinking of a Korma. And am planning on a mint chutney as well.

Suvir, Monica, Bhasin, Vikram, Anil, SKChai, torakris and any or all other eguletteers please....

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am approaching the dead line for my cooking class. The class is on this Saturday the 25th Oct, 03.

It is two hours of fun hands on cooking and an hour of dining with the cooked food and pairing a wine or two. I have 24 trainee cooks coming for the class.

Any more suggestions please, yes I am adding in Saag Paneer and also thinking of a Korma. And am planning on a mint chutney as well.

Suvir, Monica, Bhasin, Vikram, Anil, SKChai, torakris and any or all other eguletteers please....

Sorry Prasad I have not been around lately. I would love to help with your next class though. What was the exact menu for your class on the 25th and how long did it last. What did you charge.

I have always wanted to do a cooking class but never seem to get around to it. To figure out how to do it I tried to quizz my guests and that confused me even more. I wanted to do a menu and go into some of the techniques ( whatever best you can in a couple of hours) some people were OK with that but there were a majority of them who only wanted to learn certain dishes ' teach me how to make chicken tikka masalla or a vindaloo' and thats it. Until one patron showed me the light. She told me that 'you should do what you want to do, chalk-out what you want to present and those who like the sound of it will attend'.

I even took a class with Julie Sahni at Sur la Table to kind of learn the ropes.

Lets put together a menu here that we can prepare in 2-3 hours and get some feedback from the folks who lurk in these forums.

When is your next cooking class?

Bombay Curry Company

3110 Mount Vernon Avenue, Alexandria, VA 22305. 703. 836-6363

Delhi Club

Arlington, Virginia

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hey how was your class

Thanks Monica:

Class was great. I had the opportunity to speak to every table while they were having dinner and seemed they enjoyed every moment.

I had a pretty busy Friday night, the night before the class and I couldn't get out of the kitchen till 12:00 midnight. I should have planned ahead, but you know restaurant people always leave it to the last minute.

I wa under pressure and a deadline to beat, before the students arrived. I was ready with everything and guess what? I totally forgot the camera which was actually sitting on my desk. Well, as we say there is always a next time.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Bhasin: No problem, I understand you are busy.

My next class is in Feb 04. I have done these classes before and in the past I have done some introductory stuff.

For the few classes, this is what I have done. Include a map of India with regions and explain the basics of the food on how it differs from region to region. Then I would explain some of the spices, lentils legumes and the basics. Show them how to make a basic garam masala.

In the past I have done: Garam masala, rice pilav, alu gobi, lamb rogan josh, shrimp moilee, bagara dal, rice pudding (Kheer), malai kofta, onion bhajia and so on.

The class typically lasts two and a half to three hours, including dinner.

This past Saturday the following was the menu.

Vegetable Pakora

Chapathi and Poori

Garam masala

Avial Malabar

Chicken Curry

Shrimp Korma

Sag Paneer.

I had the pleasure of Having two of my many favorite people (chefs) help me. Chef Kaushik Roy of Bricklane Curry house from New York and Chef Peter Beck (former chef of Tamarind) who is currently working with me.

It is kind of semi-hands on. I hand out a booklet with the recipes of everything I do and some times I ask them to read a recipe out and probably the others to cook and stir and I watch them do so. It's fun.

I have the whole folder of these basic recipes on my desktop. If some one can guide me thru to post that file, I shall do so.

Thanks again, every one.......

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Prasad2

I really like your menu, and may I say that your website is excellent too.

"Burgundy makes you think of silly things, Bordeaux

makes you talk about them, and Champagne makes you do them." Brillat-Savarin

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Similar Content

    • By liuzhou
      This almost had me in tears of nostalgia. My London home is a few minutes walk from here and I love the place. So glad to hear it seems to be being protected from developers, as I had heard it was under threat.   Wonderful food, too. Mostly vegetarian, which I'm decidedly not, but will happily eat from time to time.   London's most authentic Indian food?    
       
    • By Sheel
      Prawn Balchao is a very famous Goan pickle that has a sweet, spicy and tangy flavor to it. 
      For the balchao paste you will need:
      > 8-10 kashmiri red chillies
      > 4-5 Byadagi red chillies
      > 1/2 tsp cumin seeds
      > 1/2 tsk turmeric powder 
      > 1 tsp peppercorn
      > 6 garlic cloves
      > 1/2 tsp cloves
      > 1 inch cinnamon stick
      > Vinegar 
      First you will need to marinate about 250 grams of prawns in some turmeric powder and salt. After 15 minutes deep fry them in oil till them become golden n crisp. Set them aside and add tsp vinegar to them and let it sit for 1 hour. Now, make a paste of all the ingredients mentioned under the balchao paste and make sure not to add any water. In the same pan used for fryin the prawns, add in some chopped garlic and ginger. Lightly fry them and immediately add one whole chopped onion. Next, add the balchao paste amd let it cook for 2-3 minutes. Add in the prawns and cook until the gravy thickens. Finally add 1 tsp sugar and salt according to your taste. Allow it to cool. This can be stored in a glass jar. Let this mature for 1-3 weeks before its use. Make sure never to use water at any stage. This can be enjoyed with a simple lentil curry and rice.
    • By Deeps
      This is one of my daughter favorite dishes, being mild and less spicy she loves this rice dish.  Its super easy to make and goes well with most Indian curries.
      Do try this out and I am sure you will be happy with the results.
       

       
      Prep Time : 5 mins
      Cook Time: 5 mins
      Serves: 2
       
      Ingredients:
      1 cup rice(basmati), cooked
      1/2 cup coconut, shredded or grated
      1 green chili, slit
      1 dried red chili
      1 1/2 tablespoon oil/ghee(clarified butter)
      1/2 teaspoon mustard seeds
      1/2 teaspoon cumin seeds
      1/2 tablespoon chana dal(split chickpeas)
      1/2 tablespoon urad dal(split black gram)
      1 teaspoon ginger, finely chopped
      A pinch of hing (asafoetida)
      Few curry leaves
      Salt to taste
       
      Directions
      1) Heat oil/ghee(clarified butter) in a pan in medium flame. I used coconut oil here because it tastes best for this dish.
      2) Add mustard seeds, cumin seeds, chana dal(split chickpeas), urad dal(split black gram), green chili, dried red chili, ginger and curry leaves. Fry this for 30 seconds in medium flame. The trick is to ensure that these are fried but not burned.
      3) Add a pinch of hing(asafoetida) and mix well.
      4) Now add the cooked rice and coconut. Stir well for about 15 to 20 seconds and switch off the flame.
      5) Finally add salt into this and mix well. You could add peanuts or cashew nuts if you prefer. Goes well with most curries.
    • By loki
      Sour Tomatillo Achar

      Made this one up from a recipe for lemons. It really works for tomatilloes. A unique spice mix, and really sour for a 'different' type of pickle, or achar. It is based on a Marwari recipe - from the arid north-western part of India. Tomatilloes are not used in India (or at least not much) but are quite productive plants in my garden while lemons or other sour fruits are not possible to grow here. No vinegar or lemon juice is used, because tomatilloes are very acidic and don't need any extra.

      Ingredients
      3 lbs tomatilloes husks removed and quartered
      1/4 cup salt
      1 Tbs black mustard seeds
      2 star anise buds
      10 dried chilies (I used very hot yellow peppers)
      1 tsp fenugreek seeds
      2 inch ginger (ground to a paste)
      2 TBL dark brown sugar
      1/2 cup sugar

      1. In a large bowl, put the tomatilloes and sprinkle salt over them. Cover it and leave for a day, mixing occasionally.

      2. Next day drain the tomatilloes.

      3. Dry roast the star anise (put in first as these take longer, the black mustard, and the chilie pods (add last and barely brown in places). Cool.

      4. Grind the roasted spices with the fenugreek and put aside.

      5. Add tomatilloes, ginger, sugars, and everything else to a large pan and heat to boiling.

      6. Cook till fully hot and boiling.

      7. Fill half-pint jars and seal.
    • By loki
      Sweet Eggplant Pickle

      This is an Indian pickle, some would call a chutney, that I made up from several sources and my own tastes. It is based it on my favorite sweet brinjal (eggplant here in the US) pickle available commercially. It has onion and garlic, which are often omitted in some recipes due to dietary restrictions of some religious orders. It also has dates which I added on my own based on another pickle I love. I also used olive oil as mustard oil is not available and I like it's taste in these pickles. Use other oils if you like. This has more spices than the commercial type - and I think it's superior. I avoided black mustard seed, fenugreek, and cumin because almost all other pickles use these and they start to taste the same. One recipe from Andhra Pradesh used neither and I followed it a little. It's wonderful with all sorts of Indian foods - and also used for many other dishes, especially appetizers.
      SPICE MIX (Masala)
      4 Tbs coriander seeds
      3 hot chilies (I used a very hot Habanero type, so use more if you use others)
      18 cardamom pods
      2 inches cinnamon
      24 cloves
      1 1/2 Tbs peppercorns
      MAIN INGREDIENTS
      1 cups olive oil
      4 inches fresh ginger, minced fine, about 1/2 cup
      6 cloves garlic, minced
      1 large onion finely chopped
      3 lb eggplant, diced, 1/4 inch cubes
      1/2 lb chopped dates
      1 1/2 tsp turmeric powder
      2 cups rice vinegar (4.3 percent acidity or more)
      2 cups brown sugar
      2 Tbs salt
      2 tsp citric acid
      Spice Mix (Masala)

      1. Dry roast half the coriander seeds in a pan till they begin to brown slightly and become fragrant - do not burn. Cool.

      2. Put roasted and raw coriander seeds and all the other spices in a spice mill and grind till quite fine, or use a mortar and pestle. Put aside.

      Main Pickle

      1. Heat half the oil and fry ginger till slightly browned, slowly.

      2. Add garlic, onion, and half the salt and fry slowly till these begin to brown a bit too.

      3. Add eggplant, turmeric, and spice mix (Masala) and combine well. Fry for about 5 minutes, stirring occasionally.

      4. Add rest of ingredients, including rest of the salt and olive oil and heat slowly to a boil.

      5. Boil for about 5 minutes. Add a little water if too thick - it should be nearly covered with liquid, but not quite - it will thin upon cooking so wait to add the water till heated through.

      6. Bottle in sterilized jars and seal according to your local pickling instructions. This recipe will be sufficiently acidic.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...