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Suvir Saran

Curry Powder

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If you are an Indian restaurant owner, chef or employee, could you please take some time and share with us what you know about the usage of store bought curry powder in your restaurants kitchen.

Would you mind sharing with us what recipes you use it in.

What role it plays in your kitchen.

And where these recipes using curry powder come from.

Thanks all! :smile:

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If you are an Indian restaurant owner, chef or employee, could you please take some time and share with us what you know about the usage of store bought curry powder in your restaurants kitchen.

Would you mind sharing with us what recipes you use it in.

What role it plays in your kitchen.

And where these recipes using curry powder come from.

Thanks all! :smile:

Absolutely no curry powder in our kitchen at the restaurant.

Funny, I asked my mom about it and she laughed!

P2 :wub::wub:

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If you are an Indian restaurant owner, chef or employee, could you please take some time and share with us what you know about the usage of store bought curry powder in your restaurants kitchen.

Would you mind sharing with us what recipes you use it in.

What role it plays in your kitchen.

And where these recipes using curry powder come from.

Thanks all! :smile:

Absolutely no curry powder in our kitchen at the restaurant.

Funny, I asked my mom about it and she laughed!

P2 :wub::wub:

Glad to know there is no Curry Powder in your kitchen. Gives me comfort and hope for Indian cuisine outside of India.

I hope you did not tell you mother that this guy Suvir Saran is using it? She will forever mock me if you did not clarify why I asked this question..... Did you make sure she does not think I cook with curry powder??? My grandma, like your mom, would have a certain look, that we all knew meant complete disbelief and understanding that someone was doing what no self-respecting person would do, everytime any foreigner would come into our home, fall in love with Panditjis cooking and then utter the words "I love the curries your cook made" There would perhaps two dishes with a sauce, the rest were dry, stir fries or lagee liptee sabzis (smothered vegetables) and she understood quickly that curry was not referring to sauce at all, it was an uneducated generalization. We kids knew exactly what she was thinking (get this foreigner a quick course in Indian cooking, right now) and would know that this person had just stepped into deep poop.. and any brownie points they had earned thus far, were gone.... My grandma would then know she was speaking with a newbie, and then the education would begin.

Curry Powder would never enter our home in Delhi or wherevr my father was transferred. In fact in my kitchen, I make my own Sambhaar Podi, Rassam Podi and Achaari Masala and all other spice powders. I have 3 spice grinders and I use them often and with careless abandon. The spices are ground the very moment I am using them, never any problem about them being dull or stale. Makes for food that certainly leaves a lasting impression.

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Time to come clean, and I hope my grandma will not look at me funny. :sad:

Whilst testing recipes for my cookbook, I did try using curry powder, and have given it as a substitute in a few dishes, where with some tweaking of other spices, I was able to get a result that would be close enough to the authentic rendering minus it. But these are very rare instances.

Also, I have made a Pasta using curry powder. Made it for Valentines dinner 7 years ago. It was a huge success. I was embarassed to have made it, my partner was amazed at it, some how, I could not enjoy it myself. Result, they keep wanting it again, and I have completely frozen it from my memory. I never made it again.

These are my curry powder indulgences. :smile:

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I hope you did not tell you mother that this guy Suvir Saran is using it?  She will forever mock me if you did not clarify why I asked this question..... Did you make sure she does not think I cook with curry powder??? 

self-respecting person would do, everytime any foreigner would come into our home, fall in love with Panditjis cooking and then utter the words .....

Curry Powder would never enter our home in Delhi or wherevr my father was transferred. In fact in my kitchen, I make my own Sambhaar Podi, Rassam Podi and Achaari Masala and all other spice powders. I have 3 spice grinders and I use them often and with careless abandon.  The spices are ground the very moment I am using them, never any problem about them being dull or stale.  Makes for food that certainly leaves a lasting impression.

Ooops Suvir, I had to tell my mom that you asked this question "curry Powder" that is when she had a laugh. Dont worry, she only knows you as "Computer Cook" not as Suvir Saran. Because whenever I ask her a recipe to post she will ask me who is it for, then I say it's the guy online. Now I explained it all. She has all full respect restored for you.

You are so right about no self-respecting chef / person / cook will use curry powder.

Now for some reason, me just like you, I have used Ayyam curry poder from Thaliland trying to make Singapore Noodles. That is what the recipe called for! It was OK!

My mom demanded that we go to Indian Market to buy a blender, first I was not too happy to take my Mom to Indian market. There I go and she buys a blender for $ 200 or so, called Sumeet which actually comes with different attachments. One as wet blender, an other is a dry blender, an other is spice blender and some misc. ones.

Then last year she goes to India and ends up coming back with a National blender and an other one a stone grinder (Big but very quiet). Now we too have quite a few blenders at home and I know and see all these whole chilis and spices getting blended at home.

Still there is No curry powder though.............

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Prasasd, your mother is inspirational to me and certainly to many I know. I have been talking her up with friends and family. Please thank her and tell her the computer guy admires her immensely.

Nothing like freshly ground spices. They are amazing. They keep my love for Indian food alive and fresh.

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In the mid seventies and early eighties in new Delhi, there was a wonderful hotel called the Akbar. Maybe it was because I started my career here but I even now think of it as one of the best thought of and designed facillities that I have come accross, ever! Maybe, I will one day describe it on the 'what whould the next restaurant be thread'.

Anyway this hotel had a 24 hrs coffee shop called Madhuban. It was in those days the most popular eatery in Dehli and its most popular non vegetarian selection was ' Chooza Kabab '. Bite sized pieces of bonless chicken marinated in oil, lemon juice, salt, pepper and yup Curry Powder. These were skewered with onion, tomato and peppers and then grilled on a griddle. When done this was served on a bed of rice topped by a curried sauce. The curried sauce was in essence a bechamel with garlic,onion, chicken stock and you guessed it Curry Powder, finished with some cream.

When we wanted to recreate it from memory we would come close but not quite.

Then one day I bought a cookbook from a store going out of bussiness, it cost me two bucks and there it was the reciepe we were looking for ( it wasn't called chooza kabab though). Now you want to know the name of the book?? I'll tell you if you promise not to laugh.

A Guide to Mordern American Cooking - Pol Martin. ISBN 0-517-10327-3

Am I ashamed to use this curry powder in our kitchen and credit an American cookbook for the reciepe?

Nope.

Chooza Kabab is one of our popular entrees. The patrons love it. Is it Indian? Is this fusion?

you figure.

There is a natural food store in my neighborhood which sells loose (bulk) curry powder and you can get it Mild, Medium or Hot. It is a good product and they get it from St John's Herb Garden, (301) 262-5302,

http:www.st-johns.com


Bombay Curry Company

3110 Mount Vernon Avenue, Alexandria, VA 22305. 703. 836-6363

Delhi Club

Arlington, Virginia

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in continuation of this curry powder thread. I remember using it once in a dish we sometimes have on our buffet based on a British rechaufe dish where they would reheat leftover roast chicken in a sauce with curry powder, apples and raisins.

We had no leftover chicken, tweaked the reciepe a bit and it turned out quite nice.


Bombay Curry Company

3110 Mount Vernon Avenue, Alexandria, VA 22305. 703. 836-6363

Delhi Club

Arlington, Virginia

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Amazing anecdote BBhasin. Thanks for sharing. What a charming story.

You should be very proud to be able to serve Chooza Kabab. It sounds wonderful.

I was in Atlanta a couple of years ago, Nathalie Dupree and I were cooking Country Captain Chicken. We had no curry powder, I promised Nathalie I will make up for her not having her curry powder in this test kitchen with mixing my own spices.... She agreed to give it a try, what we concocted together, was loved by all (plenty of NYC chefs, some critically acclaimed by the NY Times). No one missed the lack of curry powder, and Nathalie was all smiles. It was the beginning of a friendship that the two of us have grown to enjoy. We did not miss the curry powder, I hardly feel she was wrong to have used it before. Everything has a time and place. We have since cooked many things together.... .and I wish I could cook with her more often. It was amazing to see how closely the Southern US chef thinks to an Indian chef. There was more bringing us together than what separated us.

What else do you use curry powder in BBhasin?

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I learned a lot from Monica's cookbook about spices and grinding and such,and have grinded my own mixes to great success.

However, I have a dish I make often, because I love it, its easy,and healthy. I make it for myself when my family is having burgers or pasta dishes,a nd I want a healthier choice. I defrost a lamb tenderloin, make a curry powder/brown sugar/oil paste, rub it in, and grill or broil for a few minutes, with a simple cucumber raita as an accompaniment. The last time I made it, I had to search out the curry powder in the spice cabinet, and I realized how I rarely use it anymore, except for this one dish. Also, I sometimes throw a shake or two into store bought mayo, for easy chicken salad.


Edited by Kim WB (log)

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I have found one or two brands of curry powder that I use sometimes when I marinate meat. Mostly I use my own mixes, but some of the spice powder -- particularily the specialized ones are really good.

Thanks Kim for the note above, I am glad. I will be happy to send you some recipes from my upcoming book if you like! PM me anytime

M


Monica Bhide

A Life of Spice

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Mostly I use my own mixes, but some of the spice powder -- particularily the specialized ones are really good.

Monica, what do you mean by "but some of the spice powder -- particularily the specialized ones are really good"?

Are you talking curry powder and just wrote spice powder by error, or do you use curry powder in place of other powders or other powders in place of curry powder? Little lost here, but I know you will explain it just perfectly when you do read this post.

Thanks. :smile:

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Monica, I know you must be very busy, but we miss you in the Indian forum. I hope you can make more time to drop by every now and then.... We miss you here. :wub:

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OK I am not an Indian chef, but before I started cooking Indian food , I like most Americans, thought it was all based on curry powder. Imagine my surprise when I bought a couple of Indian cookbooks and found not a single recipe using curry powder. I still have it in the house and I do use it, but not in Indian cooking, usually Indian-inspired dishes that a based on the curry powder flavor. Noodle dishes, a quick chicken wing marinade of curry powder, yogurt, lemon juice and salt and pepper (the Japanese really like this flavor), and quick "curry" I got off of epicurious with curry powder, coconut milk, chickpeas, potatoes and spinach.

Great thread Suvir! You may open a lot of eyes!


Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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OK I am not an Indian chef, but before I started cooking Indian food , I like most Americans, thought it was all based on curry powder. Imagine my surprise when I bought a couple of Indian cookbooks and found not a single recipe using curry powder. I still have it in the house and I do use it, but not in Indian cooking, usually Indian-inspired dishes that a based on the curry powder flavor. Noodle dishes, a quick chicken wing marinade of curry powder, yogurt, lemon juice and salt and pepper (the Japanese really like this flavor), and quick "curry" I got off of epicurious with curry powder, coconut milk, chickpeas, potatoes and spinach.

Great thread Suvir! You may open a lot of eyes!

Thanks!

What are some of the other dishes you prepare using Curry Powder? What brand do you use? What books do you use for Indian cooking?

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Prasad,

The ingredients vary slightly, most contain

corriander seeds

cumin seeds

mustard seeds

turmuric

fenugreek seeds

dried whole red chillies

in the variations some add one or more of the following

cloves

dried curry leaves

hing or asfoteda

peppercorns

rice powder

and even lemon grass

there are numerous versions like Indian, Chinese, Thai, Malasian and African etc. And each has variations in themselves.

If you plan to use curry powder I would recomend Indian and you will have to research and experiment to arrive at what suits your needs best. It is a good idea to stick to a good reputable brand as that will ensure consistancy.

I may have forgotten an ingredient or two but you get the general picture. The whole spices are roasted and then ground to a powder.

Bhasin


Bombay Curry Company

3110 Mount Vernon Avenue, Alexandria, VA 22305. 703. 836-6363

Delhi Club

Arlington, Virginia

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Prasad,

The ingredients vary slightly, most contain

corriander seeds

cumin seeds

mustard seeds

turmuric

fenugreek seeds

dried whole red chillies

in the variations some add one or more of the following

cloves

dried curry leaves

hing or asfoteda

peppercorns

rice powder

and even lemon grass

there are numerous versions like Indian, Chinese, Thai, Malasian and African etc. And each has variations in themselves.

If you plan to use curry powder I would recomend Indian and you will have to research and experiment to arrive at what suits your needs best. It is a good idea to stick to a good reputable brand as that will ensure consistancy.

I may have forgotten an ingredient or two but you get the general picture. The whole spices are roasted and then ground to a powder.

Bhasin

Thanks Bbhasin

I am amazed all these ingredients in one mix "a curry powder".

My question is, is there any traditional recipe which calls for curry powder or one recipe which calls for all these ingredients together.

I feel one gets handicapped by using this mix of unneccessary ingredients of curry powder if the recipe calls for only some. Also on the balancing or combination of these spices you are on the mercy of the manufacturer and we are not even talking about the quality of the raw material used here in this curry powder.

Correct me if I am wrong but I feel one should have all of the ingredients in their pantry and roast, grind or blend. I can imagine an occasional cook using curry powder how disappointing he or she gets after trying a recipe and saying " I do not like curry".

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Mostly I use my own mixes, but some of the spice powder -- particularily the specialized ones are really good.

Monica, what do you mean by "but some of the spice powder -- particularily the specialized ones are really good"?

Are you talking curry powder and just wrote spice powder by error, or do you use curry powder in place of other powders or other powders in place of curry powder? Little lost here, but I know you will explain it just perfectly when you do read this post.

Thanks. :smile:

Curry powder is right.. sometimes I type too fast for my own good!


Monica Bhide

A Life of Spice

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Curry powder is right.

What brands of Curry Powder would you recommend Monica?

Are these available in large supermarkets? Do you find them in Indian stores?

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I will have to go home and look at the names. They were a gift from a friend a while ago. They are a supermarket brand for sure. I liked the mild flavor they imparted to the marinades.


Monica Bhide

A Life of Spice

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Chooza Kabab is one of our popular entrees. The patrons love it. Is it Indian? Is this fusion?

you figure.

Hi Bbhasin

Chooza kabab really sounds good. From the time I have read about it, I can't stop thinking about it.

Do you use breast of chicken or the dark meat? Would you mind sharing the recipe? I would love to try it.

P2

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OK I am not an Indian chef, but before I started cooking Indian food , I like most Americans, thought it was all based on curry powder. Imagine my surprise when I bought a couple of Indian cookbooks and found not a single recipe using curry powder. I still have it in the house and I do use it, but not in Indian cooking, usually Indian-inspired dishes that a based on the curry powder flavor. Noodle dishes, a quick chicken wing marinade of curry powder, yogurt, lemon juice and salt and pepper (the Japanese really like this flavor), and quick "curry" I got off of epicurious with curry powder, coconut milk, chickpeas, potatoes and spinach.

Great thread Suvir! You may open a lot of eyes!

Thanks!

What are some of the other dishes you prepare using Curry Powder? What brand do you use? What books do you use for Indian cooking?

I prety much listed most of the dishes I use a curry powder for others would be a Japanese dish called dry curry (dorai kare) which is a sauceless curry that consists of ground meat and niced vegetables, I have also used it to season the veggies I stuff into a samosa :shock:

I am currently using Penzey's mild curry powder and i really like the flavor of it.

As to books, Almost everything I have is Madhur Jaffrey and the recipe I have gotten from you Suvir! :wub:


Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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I was.inspired by this thread and went ahead and purchased curry powder from an Indian grocer. Ugh! It included black salt as one of the ingredients. The brand was Deep.

I thought b-s. (black salt) was reserved for chaat masala (At least, that's where it should stay...)

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There is a whole discussion on curry powder in the cooking forum - please check there as well

(we are working on consolidating some threads)


Monica Bhide

A Life of Spice

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