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Japanese foods--gyuniku (beef)


torakris
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Beef Negimaki... which I don't think is at all authentic.

And steak hibachi-style.

I also like the one which has a hot stone surface on the table which you cook your beef on.

Beef Sukiyaki and Shabu Shabu.

Jason Perlow

Co-Founder, The Society for Culinary Arts & Letters

offthebroiler.com - Food Blog | View my food photos on Instagram

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Jason,

beef maki's (maki means roll) are quite authentic, and are very popular homestyle type dishes.

The name will change though depending on what in being rolled in the beef (if they are even using beef, there are bacon-maki, buta-maki, etc)

negimaki are beef rolls with naganegi (Japanese leek) or other type of scallion

asupara-maki are rolls with asparagus

enokimaki are rolls with enoki mushrooms

ingenmaki are rolls with green beans

etc

etc

the cooking on the hot stone surface is called ishiyaki

ishi meaning stone.

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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I eat beef only very rarely, because I don't trust the Japanese government when they say BSE is nothing to worry about. I actually don't miss it all that much, since I was never a big beef eater.

The things I really miss:

A juicy medium-rare Japanese steak- served sizzling on an iron plate, with either grated daikon and ponzu sauce or roasted potatoes and fried garlic.

Hoba-yaki- cubes of Japanese beef in a miso sauce, grilled in a big 'hoba' leaf.

Beef tataki- a strip of beef that is seared on the outside and raw inside, chilled and thinly sliced, served with ponzu sauce and garnishes like sliced green onions, shiso, grated daikon etc.

Sukiyaki.

Otherwise, I live Japanese pork and find it makes a great substitute for beef most of the time. Especially shabu-shabu- I actually prefer it with pork!

My eGullet foodblog: Spring in Tokyo

My regular blog: Blue Lotus

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Isn't Beef Negimaki usually referred to as "Beef Roll" in Japan?

Shabu Shabu wirth Pork sounds good. I'm thinking about it right now. A lot.

Would it have another name? I mean like the way that "kani-shabu" is Crab. (swishy crab? crab swish? Which way is it?) :biggrin:

Jon Lurie, aka "jhlurie"

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Isn't Beef Negimaki usually referred to as "Beef Roll" in Japan?

Shabu Shabu wirth Pork sounds good.  I'm thinking about it right now.  A lot. 

Would it have another name?  I mean like the way that "kani-shabu" is Crab. (swishy crab?  crab swish?  Which way is it?)  :biggrin:

negimaki per se isn't an actual "dish"

it depends on what is being rolled and with what.

I remeber eating a lot of negimaki at Japanese restaurants in the US, and then very surprised to come here and find that negi (scallions) weren't used as much as other vegetables. Actually pork and bacon are more popular as rolling mediums here.

buta-shabu (pork shabu shabu) is also just refered to as shabu shabu since shabu shabu refers to the swishing sound rather then the type of meat used. Though traditionally it was beef, fish and other seafood have become very popular and pork was the newest one following the BSE scare a little while ago.

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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Sukiyaki...

The Japanese supermarket near my house has angus beef, very well marbled, specificically for sukiyaki. I don't eat this all the time, usually a few times in the winter. It's always a treat.

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[in a small voice: I prefer bulgogi, kalbi, yukue...]

"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

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Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

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[in a small voice: I prefer bulgogi, kalbi, yukue...]

Actually Jin I am with you, Koreans do much better things with beef!

But this is the Japan board after all! :biggrin:

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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The Japanese do do some good things with beef!

Gyu-tataki--seared close to raw beef, sliced or cubed usually topped with some kind of ponzu and maybe some grated daikon and slivered onions

sukiyaki--a wonderful dish of sweet and salty beef and vegetables

shabu shabu barely cooked beef dipped in a variety of dressing, oh yeah and there are usually vegtables too.

then there is kobe steak that tastes good no matter how it is cooked (as long as it is done right!)

I have also had gyu-tataki sushi before that was quite good.

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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[in a small voice: I prefer bulgogi, kalbi, yukue...]

Actually Jin I am with you, Koreans do much better things with beef!

But this is the Japan board after all! :biggrin:

It could be said though, that Korean food and Yakiniku has become so popular in Japan now that it in effect has BECOME Japanese.

Jason Perlow

Co-Founder, The Society for Culinary Arts & Letters

offthebroiler.com - Food Blog | View my food photos on Instagram

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  • 1 year later...
Kristin, the link to the niku jaga recipe above doesn't work for me - would you mind posting the recipe in this thread?

sorry about that!

but you can find the recipe with detailed instructions and pictures at my Japanese Cuisine class at eGCI:

http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?showtopic=28058

here is the finished dish

gallery_6134_549_1105395375.jpg

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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  • 1 year later...

My local Japanese grocery had packages of wagyu/kobe beef on sale today; reduced from AUD$18 to AUD$10 for a packet of 300g. Not bad!

Any thoughts on how most deliciously to prepare this? I haven't cooked with this cut before, which they call "karubi" (presumably from Korean kalbi), although I'd thought kalbi were ribs, whereas these are thickish slices, maybe 1/4 inch thick.

I want something better than just grilled, but am drawing a bit of a blank as to how to accentuate the creaminess of the meat..are you supposed to cook it medium rare, to highlight the tenderness, or cook it near well-done, to melt the fat marbling?? :huh:

gallery_50383_4084_61040.jpg

Edited by rarerollingobject (log)
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Normally the Korean word kalbi does mean the rib cut with the bone, except in Japan. The kalbi cut here though is pretty much used for yakiniku (Japanese style Korean grilled meats). They are sliced to the perfect thickness for searing both sides over a flame without overcooking it or the insides being left raw.

I would definitely recommend cooking it over a flame, or if you can't a searing hot fry pan cooking only a couple pieces at a time so they don't end up swimming in the fat. It really needs no seasoning other than salt and pepper.

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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I just looked at the picture again and noticed a tube of yuzu koshou in the corner. A dab of that on each piece before eating would be quite nice...

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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I just looked at the picture again and noticed a tube of yuzu koshou in the corner. A dab of that on each piece before eating would be quite nice...

Very good spotting, that is indeed my current drug of choice!

This was my actual haul from the grocery:

gallery_50383_4084_24777.jpg

Note serendipitous purchase of shabu shabu pork, so I'm definitely making your YK-thread recommendation of the pork and cucumber salad tonight! :biggrin:

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I think the Cooking Forum is the right place to post your question if you want ideas other than just grilling it rare or medium rare. Marbled beef is like fatty tuna (toro), and you don't want to spoil it with excess cooking or seasoning, right? :smile:

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