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Suvir Saran

Indian Restaurants

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Sorry, I was referring to the San Francisco Bay Area.

MV/PA = Mountain View/Palo Alto.

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West of London in Richmond: The Litchfield Brasserie. It's in the center of town near some art supply stores. Standard English Indian restaurant menu fare, but painfuly fresh and delicately prepared.

West side of Columbus, OH at Fishinger Road just east of the outerbelt (Ther's a Shell gas station at the corner.) It's called India Palace, I believe. It's in a strip mall. A buffet during the day although menu is available. Full standard US Indian restaurant menu. Again, fresh and beautifully prepared. More breads than a lot of places.

In either event, when I see lots of Indians (or Asians, as the case may be) dining at a restaurant, it tends to make me trust my own tastes.

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I've kinda compiled a list of all Indian buffets in the Pacific Northwest, as they all have something to offer (or not!). My absolute favorite Indian buffet by far is Spirit of India, in downtown Renton Washington.

They often have lamb on the buffet, and they bring fresh hot naan to your table!

http://spiritofindia.com/

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I just did an article for Washingtonian Magazine (May 2004) on the best Indian restaurants in the DC metro area. The piece is not online yet but you can find it at your local newstand here in DC. I hope you will enjoy it!

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Hi all,

Please help me out with this,

If an Indian was in your city, where would you send him if he was longing for indian food. (FYI, I am compiling this for an article). I would appreciate it if you could mention the city, regional cuisine that the restaurant serves and the contact details or website.

Rushina

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Hi all,

Please help me out with this,

If an Indian was in your city, where would you send him if he was longing for indian food. (FYI, I am compiling this for an article). I would appreciate it if you could mention the city, regional cuisine that the restaurant serves and the contact details or website.

Rushina

Rushina - if you look thru this thread and then head over to the individual state forums you will find a lot of what you are looking for! Good luck with your article

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In the Seattle metro area, our faves are Tandoor in the University District, and Mayuri or Savoy on the Eastside. Indian food is our favorite Sunday brunch option!

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In VCE

Sri Ganesh

S.Polo 2426,

Venezia, IT

It started off catering to offbeat locals and hidden food helpers from the sub-continent who work in the tonier and upscale Italian eateries in city :wink: It is really off the beaten path and not so easily idenitfiable. The Lunch menu is simple fixed rice and a non-veg dish, or ar rice and a vegetarian dish.

Now a days it has started seeing ''desi's" come by in large numbers thanks to BPOs and CCs :biggrin: It does satisfy a desires of many who only want to eat vegetarian and be asured that no animal fat went into its preparation.

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I find both Mayuri and Savoy rather dull and I find that they suffer from the same problem most Indian restaurants do, namely no interest in using fresh ingredients. I've pretty much given up on eating good South Indian food in / around Seattle. However, I've been to Punjab Sweets in Kent, WA 2-3 times and have always been more than happy with the food. The food is always freshly prepared and the Makke di roti and sarson da saag smells xactly like they used to at my punjabi friends' homes. The Bhatura is amongst the best I've had in the US and the chole (made in the Punjabi/Sikh tradition where its dark rather than light like the Sindhis make em) is wonderful too. I always end up overeating leaving no room for dessert so I cant comment on the sweets.

The service is nothing to write home about since its a really small place and being a family run place, orders often take time to arrive on a crowded Saturday/Sunday afternoon. Might be a good idea to call and order on your way there - I usually do that and they have hot yummy food waiting by the time I reach the restaurant.

- worm@work

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Good call, worm@work! I love the chole at Punjab Sweets. Everything I've tried there is good, but I keep returning to the chole! Would also add Pabla's in Kent (Renton?). All vegetarian, kosher, delicious samosas at lunch.

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I find both Mayuri and Savoy rather dull and I find that they suffer from the same problem most Indian restaurants do, namely no interest in using fresh ingredients. I've pretty much given up on eating good South Indian food in / around Seattle.

That's a shame. I recall Mayuri being great back when they ran their Queen Anne location, they had such wonderful masala dosas, vadas and lamb keema. But, this was around 7 years ago, so maybe things have changed for the worse. Oh well.

One place I keep meaning to try is Udupi Palace in Bellevue, have you been there yet? Only thing that stops me is needing to take two buses to get out there.

Pat

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Udipi Palace, Sleepy_Dragon is definitely not worth two buses and your time.. I assure you. If its masala dosas and wadas you;d like, then I very sincerely invite you over to my house (which is also on the eastside unfortunately but I promise you the visit will be worth two busrides! I live really close to the Bellevue Transit Center). I promise you it'll be at least as good as the average South Indian households dosas back in India. As for lamb keema, unfortunately, I havent tried making that at home yet.. what with being a vegetarian and all :). Let me know if you'd like to take me up on that offer.. I'll need a couple of days notice to soak the rice and dal for the batter!

-worm@work [Edited to correct a typo].


Edited by worm@work (log)

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Bearing in mind that this is the India Forum any chance of some recommendations in India?

Which part of India?

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Matthew Grant Posted on Jul 30 2004, 10:16 AM...Delhi (aside from the obvious Bukhara)

Agra

Udaipur

Jaipur

Ranthambore

I will be there in Jan/Feb and would love to add Khajuraho, Varanasi to that list...any recommendations would be great. Thanks so much

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Hi,

I am looking for good restaurants in Las Vegas,Nevada & Grand Canyon area too to celebrate my 2nd yr Marriage anniversery (Lunch & Dinner :-))as we would be visiting the places shortly. Any recommendations? TIA

Laks.

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Anyone know of a good/decent Indian restaurant in orlando Florida, if possible around the disney world area. I am going to be there in the early part of september and you know how Indian people start craving Indian food soon into a vacation. Also i did not see any reccomendations for Southern California. Truthfully I havent really found any good ones myself. however here are 2 decent ones.

1.Woodlands: this is a primarilly south Indian restaurant but the chhole bhature were to die for the last time I visited. They also have a pretty good South Indian lunch buffet on weekdays.

11833 Artesia Blvd

Artesia, CA

Phone: (562) 860-6500

2. Tangra Bistro: This place serves both Indo-Chinese and thai influenced noodle dishes. Its pretty good, and the prices are reasonable. unlike other Indian restaurants the location is very spacious and conpemporarily decorated. The chef is a Chinese guy brought up in Mumbai, so his cooking is influenced by the chinese food available at "chinese vans" in India. One drawback though is that the chicken used on my last visit was kinda tough an stringy.

11305 183RD ST.

CERRITOS CA, 90703

(562) 865-6109

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Bukhara Grill, NYC (has two locations)

217 E 49th St

New York, NY 10017

(Between 2nd and 3rd Avenues)

and

230 E. 58th Street

Between 2nd and 3rd Ave.

New York, NY 10022

Link to thread on Bukhara Grill, NYC

Is the Bukhara in Chicago related to these?

I used to love the Bukhara in Chicago when I would visit it ofter about 10yrs ago. Hope it is still around.

Percy

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Bukhara in Chicago used to be owned by the ITC group and was probably related to the other restaurants by this name, but ITC sold it several years and it is now called Bukara. I was only there once and don't remember it as anything special, but someone else might have better information.

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some bay area suggestions:

best south indian

Dasaprakash in santa clara (http://www.dasaprakash.com/)

(i did find the idli and vada a bit too dense for my liking other than that everything is excellent and great decor too...no bare-bosomed four-feet high brass statues holding saunf)

someone recommended uddippi palace....i find too much baking soda in their food.

best chaat (even better than Viks of berkeley)

Chaat Paradise in mountain view (http://www.chaatparadise.com/)

everything is superb but get this...my gujju and mumbai friends say that the pau bhaji is as good as the best they have had in india or at home!!!

warning though: place is swimming in the aforementioned brass statues.

best kebab run

Shalimar in san francisco or fremont

(i know some people feel that pakwan is better but i don't belong to that category as yet)

best punjabi fish pakoras

chaat cafe in berkeley or santa clara

(they do have other stuff too which i love but i have to say that their pujabi fish pakoras are the best i have eaten in the west so far...there was another restaurant here that did an amazing fish amritsari and karela chatpatta but the chef quit and the mess they now serve in the name of these dishes is quite appalling...)

with strong opinions and totally spoilt on indian food options living in the bay area...

sp

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Bukhara/Bukara in Chicago has been closed for at least several years now. To the best of my knowledge it has not opened elsewhere or under another name in the city.

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Anyways, back on subject, I haven't seen much mention about Indian food in Chicago. I know Hema's Kitchen is a perennial favorite for top honors, but interested in other ideas.

My impression from the local chowhound board is that opinions are, in fact, mixed about Hema's. It has many fans who are quite...devoted. But the recent opening of a branch in Lincoln Park(!) has brought some less than positive reviews, of both the new branch and the original.

As to other suggestions on Devon:

Udupi Palace

2543 W Devon Ave

(773) 338-2152

Sizzle India

2509 W Devon Ave

(773) 761-7777

Sher-a-Punjab

2510 W Devon Ave

(773) 973-4000

Tiffin

2536 W Devon Ave

(773) 338-2143

Sonargaon

2306 W Devon Ave

(773) 262-8008

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Great place for mithais in souther California, its been years since i tried a Luki-Barfi

Rasthal Vegetarian Cuisine

2751-2755 W Lincoln Ave

Anaheim, CA

Phone::(714)527-3800

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This is a bit out in the middle of nowhere, but the food is quite good:

Peacock Garden

23347 Golden Springs Dr.

Diamond Bar, CA

(909) 860-2606

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