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pixelchef

French, Italian, Mexican, Asian

2 posts in this topic

Hi Mark! I'd like to first thank you for taking the time out of your busy schedule to participate in the Q&A here at eGullet. It is very much appreciated.

I was wondering which region of the world (and style of cuisine) has your heart. Does French cuisine appeal most to you? Maybe it's Italian? I'd love to know! And in the same vein, how do you feel about the recently-emerging "avant-garde" style of cooking? Trio, WD-50, et al. jump immediately to mind. Have you dined at these establishments? How do you feel they fare against other cuisines?

Thank you very much for your time,

-Chris

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My 'favorite' cuisine changes from year to year. This year I'd have to say it's Indian. Last year Japanese. I retain my love for European food, and think its home cooking is the most appealing, but it has few surprises left for me.

I have not eaten at Trio or WD50 so cannot comment. (Trio's menu did not appeal to me.) I have eaten at El Bulli and had a terrific time. Every major city should have one such restaurant, though I doubt that will happen, since Adria's imitators mostly do lousy work. But it's not "real" food – you couldn't eat it too often, could you?

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