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Edna & Scott


Varmint
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Today's NY Times has a story that many of us have heard, but if you haven't, please read about Edna Lewis and Scott Peacock.

http://www.nytimes.com/2003/05/07/dining/07EDNA.html

Let's get the Harold and Maude jokes out of the way quickly: Ms. Edna is an 87-year old African-American and Scott is a 40 year old caucasian. Oh, and they share a home. Realize, however, that they share it as a family, not in any manner that the perverts would like to think.

This is a story that should be told and re-told. It's beautiful. Read the article, please. And then report back here.

Dean McCord

VarmintBites

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That has to be one of the sweetest stories I've ever read. What understanding! How caring! It's nice to hear of such a relationship in a sometimes cold world.

I literally have tears in my eyes!

:wub:

Iris

GROWWWWWLLLLL!!

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Well, that was a gift.

Thank you, Varmint.

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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This was the first story I read this morning . The other sections of the Times are still unread, because I found this to be such a powerful piece.

I'd never heard of Scott Peacok, but he's now on my list of People to Watch. What was the last line? He said something like:

"There is something so sacred about loving somebody."

I didn't cry, but I've barely thought of anything else for the last hour.

Margaret McArthur

"Take it easy, but take it."

Studs Terkel

1912-2008

A sensational tennis blog from freakyfrites

margaretmcarthur.com

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It's a wonderful article, indeed.

In early 88, Edna Lewis was doing a brief consulting gig at her old place, Gage and Tollner. I went in for lunch one day, ( we lived right in Brooklyn Heights at the time) with a girlfriend and my infant son. I timed it for his nap, so that we could dine while he was sleeping away in the infant seat...well, Murphy's law, he got fussy, and I picked him out of the seat, and walked towards the back area of the restaurant, which was empty. He was not screaming, just general fussiness...and as the waiter carried my food past me, he realized the situation, and brought the food back into the kitchen. A minute later, Ms. Lewis came out, took that baby on her shoulder, and started this deep, baritone humming. She told me to "go sit on down, and eat", and five minutes later, she gently placed my sleeping son into his seat...I tried to thank her and engage her in conversation, but she did a little hand wave and went back into the kitchen...so, it is good to hear that a kind person is having kindness reciprocated. I like it when things come full circle..

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The first time I met Edna and Scott was at a food symposium sponsored by the Seaside Institute. Also in attendance was Eugene Walter and Marion Cunningham. The program was on Southern Foods and foodways. AS I remember, the program was about not losing our culinary heritage.

It is good to be a BBQ Judge.  And now it is even gooder to be a Steak Cookoff Association Judge.  Life just got even better.  Woo Hoo!!!

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This is a wonderful story and should be retold. I have followed Ms. Lewis' career for years and have all of her cookbooks. She tells a wonderful story and makes Southern Cuisine come alive. I was fortunate to be at Gage & Tollner when she was there in the late 80's also. We were with my in-laws who had been there on there honeymoon 45+ yeears previously. Ms. Lewis did a special meal for them and treated them like old friends. It was a very special evening for all of us. By the way the new cookbook is great :wub: . I have been reading it like a novel all week

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It's a wonderful article, indeed.

In early 88, Edna Lewis was doing a brief consulting gig at her old place, Gage and Tollner.  I went in for lunch one day, ( we lived right in Brooklyn Heights at the time) with a  girlfriend and my infant son.  I timed it for his nap, so that we could dine while he was sleeping away in the infant seat...well, Murphy's law, he got fussy, and I picked him out of the seat, and walked towards the back area of the restaurant, which was empty.  He was not screaming, just general fussiness...and as the waiter carried my food past me, he realized the situation, and brought the food back into the kitchen.  A minute later, Ms. Lewis came out, took that baby on her shoulder, and started this deep, baritone humming. She told me to "go sit on down, and eat", and  five minutes later, she gently placed my sleeping son into his seat...I tried to thank her and engage her in conversation, but she did a little hand wave and went back into the kitchen...so, it is good to hear that a kind person is having kindness reciprocated. I like it when things come full circle..

Kim:

What an amazing story. I'm going to carry it around wtith me all day.

Thanks.

Margaret McArthur

"Take it easy, but take it."

Studs Terkel

1912-2008

A sensational tennis blog from freakyfrites

margaretmcarthur.com

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  • 3 weeks later...

The book is also reviewed in the current issue of Gourmet magazine. It sounds like a very touching story.

Seems like the publicity flacks are doing their job very well. That's a lot of exposure. Figure a turn on NPR's All Things Considered, WHYY's Fresh Air, and CBS weekend for a trifecta...

Apparently it's easier still to dictate the conversation and in effect, kill the conversation.

rancho gordo

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  • 2 weeks later...

Has anyone had a chance to review their new cookbook? I'd love to hear about it. I know kpurvis wrote a short piece on it in the Charlotte Observer, but I'd appreciate others' thoughts.

Dean McCord

VarmintBites

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  • 10 months later...

I have this cookbook and it is one of my very favorites. I'm originally from the south (North Carolina), and spent culinarily memorable and formative summers there throughout my childhood. This book is like going home.

I highly recommend the book and highly commend the authors.

Cheers,

Squeat

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Everyone is all hearts and flowers about this in this thread - and the other thread discussing the same subject.

But has anyone really considered the practicalities of taking care of an 88 year old who has cognitive impairment and - quite probably - a fair number of health issues? Obviously her roommate isn't capable of doing it himself - which is why he's soliciting money on her behalf. Her family finds this objectionable - because they think it's undignified. Moreover - she qualifies for government benefits - which would eliminate the need for these solicitations.

The media has - predictably - concentrated on all the fluff - and none of the hard stuff. After all - who wants to hear that a food icon may need adult diapers? We don't know what the facts are - and we cannot possibly know what the best interests of this woman are from medical and other points of view. Robyn

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Rachel was just being sensitive in light of the story discussed here:(http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?showtopic=42521).

However, every book sold will help Ms. Lewis in one way or another.

Not necessarily. She currently qualifies for medicaid - which would pay her expenses at a skilled nursing facility. I know it's fashionable to hate skilled nursing facilities - but I've been fortunate enough to have dealt with some good ones. They've kept family members alive - in dignified surroundings - for longer than they would have lived in other circumstances.

If she were to accumulate some money - she wouldn't be eligible for medicaid - and would have to worry about paying for care on her own. Which is kind of hard (skilled nursing runs maybe $200 a day). In fact - there are lawyers who spend their entire careers advising people how to deal with their assets in such a way as to qualify for medicaid in skilled nursing facilities. Robyn

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