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Parsnips


jeniac42
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The thread about beets reminded me of my experience with parsnips.

Sometime last year, I decided to make a root vegetable pot pie thing (from Deborah Madison's book). It had parsnips in it, which I'd never eaten but thought sounded awfully good. So I bought some parsnips from Wild Oats, brought them home, chopped 'em up, and cooked them on the stovetop as was called for in the recipe.

Now, at some point, the air started to smell like sickly sweet latex. I eventually determined that this smell was coming from the parsnips. I tasted one, and it tasted about the same. It was possibly the least appetizing thing I've ever eaten. So I chucked the whole dish and did something else instead.

Did I do something wrong? (I didn't core the parsnips, but they didn't seem too woody or anything.) Bad parsnips? How can I pick good ones the next time? I want to like them!

Jennie

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I personally love parsnips and I think that they are under-rated in general. They can be woody etc, but I have never heard of them smelling like latex etc. They have a strong flavour, not to everybodies liking, but they also have a high sugar content that balances out the strong flavour/bitterness. The older they get the more woody and bitter they get. I would try to buy smaller parsnips as they are mainly, but not always, they younger ones.

They are extremely good roasted, as Veg. 'chip's and used as a base for coconut soups and curries.

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From the Chapelle show: "What the f*!$ is a parsnip?"

I dig parsnips, they certainly have a distinctive flavor and I can understand why some may not like them. I enjoy mixing them up with some potatoes, onions, and carrots to roast along with a chicken.

Ben

Gimme what cha got for a pork chop!

-Freakmaster

I have two words for America... Meat Crust.

-Mario

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Now, at some point, the air started to smell like sickly sweet latex.  I eventually determined that this smell was coming from the parsnips.  I tasted one, and it tasted about the same.  It was possibly the least appetizing thing I've ever eaten.  So I chucked the whole dish and did something else instead.

Did I do something wrong?  (I didn't core the parsnips, but they didn't seem too woody or anything.)  Bad parsnips?  How can I pick good ones the next time?  I want to like them!

I've seen them waxed before. I'm not sure why they put a thin coat of wax on them; perhaps to inhibit root growth or to keep them fresh?

Anyway, are you sure that there wasn't a wax coating that you didn't completely remove?

Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"
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They aren't waxed here!

Parsnips are delicious.

Roast: Parboil first, then roast like potatos, but not as long, and in quite a lot of fat. The high sugar content causes them to burn quickly. You want the caramalised, but not burnt.

Pureed, or pureed with potato

Soup: Lightly curried parsnip is good hot or cold, as is "nip and nip" parsnip and turnip

Parsnip crisps

Blumenthal and others do a version of "corn flakes and milk" but with parsnip crisps and parsnip infused milk.

Maybe it was the pan handle burning...

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.....

I enjoy mixing them up with some potatoes, onions, and carrots to roast along with a chicken.

Throw in some purple-top turnip, too.

-- Jeff

"I don't care to belong to a club that accepts people like me as members." -- Groucho Marx

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Parsnip Crisps the Margot Way.

Peel and then use the peeler to make ribbons of parsnip.Blanch in hot fat, then fry again till golden brown.Drain on papper,sprinkle with salt and a twist of pepper.Highly addictive :biggrin:

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I don't blanch them.  I slice them thin the long way, and saute them in butter until caramenized.  I think they're durn tasty.

Mmmm, yes! Long, slow caramelizing is my favorite way with parsnips. C/W Spencer's method sounds good as well -- I must try it.

Per Ogden Nash:

The parsnip, children, I repeat

Is simply an anemic beet

Some people find the parsnip edible

Myself, I find this claim incredible

and

Celery, raw

Develops the jaw;

Celery, stewed

Is more quietly chewed

Ogden's da man . . .

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Love parsnips but only roasted - I like to cut them into sticks, roast the sticks and dip them in a curry spiked dip - yum, yum, yum!

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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OK, at the risk of sounding post-hyper-forward thinking-modern

boil parsnips, run through food mill, add cream and beurre noisette (brown butter) and a light pinch of raw minced garlic

and serve with a nice white flaky fish. I did it with Barrimundi (spelling?)--which they are also calling Australian Seabass-- last week for a tasting menu with just a little more beurre noisette on top of the fish acting as a sauce. Delicate, fragrant, made for each other. Substitute striped bass, halibut (which is back in season), or a particularly nice brown trout. It works best in small portions.

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I adore parsnips too.  Parsnip and pancetta tagliatelle... *drool*

Very much Pro-Parnsips, and I vote.

Also agree that they are under-rated. Sauteed with shallots and pancetta...yumm! I always throw them in when I make chicken soup.

Agree that they are wonderful roasted with salt, thyme, and then splash some balsamic vinegar at the end. Divine. Slightly sweet flavor but crisp.

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Adam, I like roasted parsnips too!

And I agree also with CW Spencer and Basildog and others.

I like them best mixed with other root vegetables and shallots, roasted in duck fat, squidged up a bit so edges become blurred, dusted with sheep's milk cheese like pecorino. Very explosive flavours that are very happy with prime rib or roast leg of lamb. Or as Ron says, braise short ribs.

Latex smell? I really have no idea what this means.

"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

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I am a definite parsnip "yum" person, but only learned to be that way within the past 6 years or so. My first experience with this veg was at a restaurant in N. Wales. I had no idea what this lusciously sweet vegetable was so I couldn't even refer to it by name! I finally asked the waitress a generic, "How are the vegetables cooked?" and she replied that the Parsnips were roasted and basted with butter and honey. Awesome.

But my all-time favorite way to eat them is as Parsnip Pie, a savory side dish. I thought I had posted it on another thread but can't seem to find it so here it is again.

Parsnip Pie

2 lbs. parsnips, peeled and thinly sliced

vegetable oil of choice for frying

2 oz. butter

salt and pepper

8-10 oz. cream

1 lb. tomatoes, skinned, seeded and chopped

6 oz. Teifi cheese (it's Welsh) grated. If you can't find it, substitue Gouda. I once tried it with a smoked Gouda which added an barely discernable but deliciously different aspect.

4-6 Tbsp. fresh breadcrumbs

Lightly fry parsnips in oil until just tender.

Butter a 2-3 pint casserole dish and begin layering: parsnips, s&p, a drizzle of cream, tomatoes, more cream, cheese. Repeat until all is used up. Top with breadcrumbs and dot with butter.

Bake for 30 minutes in 400 F. oven until bubbling at sides and crispy on top.

kit

"I'm bringing pastry back"

Weebl

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I like parsnips, BUT I think they need to be treated specially... I've had them roasted, which to me was only ok, they were too sweet for me - but I've added a small amount of boiled mashed parsnip to mashed potatoes and it adds a lovely flavor. ChefSpencer's puree with fish sounds fabulous. Beets on the other hand, I adore.

Born Free, Now Expensive

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