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What sorts of mustards do you like? The type of mustard I like is pungent without a hint of sweetness (fie upon honey mustards), but not too vinegary. Inglehoffer's Stone Ground tends to be rather good, but it's got a little too much vinegar (overpowers the taste of the mustard). What sorts of mustards do you like? Any brands? Or do you make your own?

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Maille Dijon.

Keen's Powder to use in breadings and such.

I've made mustard by grinding seeds (even trying toasted) with various vineagars and wines. Usually not worth the effort but occasionally is.

Maille Dijon. Really. No poupon Maille.

"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

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Zatarain's Creole

Jack Daniels Horseradish

Grey Poupon Dijon

Freshly made hot mustard - my sinuses salute you!

That is the current list. But then, I am a fickle sort. The 10 or 12 in my fridge is witness to that.

(BTW... Do you really have to refrigerate mustard?)

Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

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Sierra Nevada makes a great, hearty grainy mustard, stands up wonderfully to a earthy grain bread and thick sliced country ham from the Farmer's Market, or kielbasa and blancehd onion, a chunk of each dipped into a ramekin of Sierra Nevada mustard. Otter Creek Brewery, in Middlebury, VT also has a great specimen...we have a house in Okemo, and we try to get over there and buy 6 jars every year...hubby is a Middlebury grad, so perhaps it has a romantic connotation to us as well..but I think its a good, spicy mustard.

I hate refined, dijon hoity toity mustards...if it has no grain, I won't use it. Mustard, to me, is a peasant food...paired with fatty meats, filled with spice and acid to cut the fat...IMHO

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Dijon mustard above all others, almost all of the time. There are plenty of good brands, but I'd choose Maille first. Variety is the spice of life, and I've tried other kinds of mustard, but they just don't deliver.

As for refrigeration, I've never seen mustard go bad, get moldy or anything like that, but I believe it stays fresher and keeps a better taste if it's refrigerated. A jar of mustard begins to lose it's flavor after it's been opened. I once brought back a huge jar of Maille mustard from France, it wasn't that I couldn't get that brand here, or that it was so much cheaper or fresher in France -- although it was pretty cheap per ounce -- but I had never seen such a large jar and though it would be neat to have. Of course the mustard began to lose it's piquancy long before we hit the bottom of the jar.

Robert Buxbaum

WorldTable

Recent WorldTable posts include: comments about reporting on Michelin stars in The NY Times, the NJ proposal to ban foie gras, Michael Ruhlman's comments in blogs about the NJ proposal and Bill Buford's New Yorker article on the Food Network.

My mailbox is full. You may contact me via worldtable.com.

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Maille Dijon. Really. No poupon Maille.

plus the empty jars look great filled with cardamom, or black mustard, or coriander seeds....

Drinking when we are not thirsty and making love at all seasons: That is all there is to distinguish us from the other Animals.

-Beaumarchais

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Lately I have been using Bornier, both Dijon and whole grain. I have an ancient unopened crock of Pommery Moutarde Royale --- how long will it be okay unopened...or would it have been? And, true confession: a squeeze bottle of French's.

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I once brought back a huge jar of Maille mustard from France, it wasn't that I couldn't get that brand here, or that it was so much cheaper or fresher in France -- although it was pretty cheap per ounce -- but I had never seen such a large jar and though it would be neat to have. Of course the mustard began to lose it's piquancy long before we hit the bottom of the jar.

Sahadi's on Atlantic Ave. in Brooklyn, NY has the big jars of Maile. They sell it for like $3.50 or some rediculously low price like that.

-Eric

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Edmond Fallot. I have their tarragon

nice one. the big brass bucket in which Fallot sometimes comes packaged is sexy too, outfitted with pens and scissors on a desk. and though i prefer maille's regular dijon, fallot's tarragon is slamming

Drinking when we are not thirsty and making love at all seasons: That is all there is to distinguish us from the other Animals.

-Beaumarchais

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I like Admiration Deli Mustard. Perfect for beef hot dogs. A great spicy mustard that I use for ham and bratwurst is Pulaski stone ground Polish mustard. My wife's favorite. We went to the Union Pork Store yesterday to pick up some of their phenomenol brats and a jar of this mustard. They were sold out of Pulaski, so we tried a German brand called Hengstenberg. It was different than anything I've tried, but excellent. Tangy, less spicy than Pulaski, but thicker in texture and very smooth. The Union Pork Store has an excellent selection of German and Polish mustards. Many kinds including Dusseldorf style served in a jar shaped like a beer stein.

John the hot dog guy

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Two others that are exceptional. Block and Guggenheim spicy brown mustard. This brand is used at Super Duper Weenie in Conn. and is the only place I've seen it. Does anyone know where it is from or where I can get it? Walter's mustard made for Walter's hot dog stand in Mamaronek, N.Y. is tasty; a good contrast of sweet and sour with little bits of pickle. Available only at Walter's. You can also order it from them.

John the hot dog guy

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Meaux (a town I lived in for three months) makes the best whole grain around.  The best.

I love whole grain mustards, and I agree that true Moutarde de Meaux can't be beat. My favourite local(Montreal) brewery, Mcauslan, makes a whole grain beer mustard that is also very good although hard to come by, even here.

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Maille Dijon.

Keen's Powder to use in breadings and such.

I've made mustard by grinding seeds (even trying toasted) with various vineagars and wines. Usually not worth the effort but occasionally is.

Maille Dijon. Really. No poupon Maille.

I tried making my own mustard for years, and ended up with a cupboard full of black, yellow, blackish yellow, yellowish black, brown, brownish yellow, yellow brownish, black brown yellow but not noticeably black brown or yellow, mustard seeds along with cardoman pods, tumeric powder, and one of those very expensive conical French sieves whose name I can't remember. After much laborous , time consuming, expensive experiments I came to the conclusion that I'd do better to just keep bottles of Temaire Dijon, kosiusko brown mustard,and cans of Colmans powdered mustard and S & J oriental powdered mustard. Does anybody else remember that jewelry that was popular in the 50s of a mustard seed embedded in a a clear plastic ball. It had something to do with a Biblical reference to a mustard seed?

"A fool", he said, "would have swallowed it". Samuel Johnson

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A true mustard maven must make a pilgrimage, either literally or in cyber-space, to the Mount Horeb Mustard Museum. An exhaustive selection of mustards, and probably the most whimisically clever catalogues I've ever had the pleasure to peruse.

Barry Levenson, the curator, is also a former assistant state attorney general who has written a fascinating book, Habeas Codfish: Reflections on Food and the Law. Worth a read . . .

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Two others that are exceptional. Block and Guggenheim spicy brown mustard. This brand is used at Super Duper Weenie in Conn. and is the only place I've seen it. Does anyone know where it is from or where I can get it? ...

I tried to find a source for Block & Guggenheim but was unsuccessful. However, the Mt. Horeb Mustard Museum may have an acceptible substitute. You may even find others that appeal to you.

Yikes, Xanthippe outpaced me. Now I'm stuck with a worthless post! Sorry!

Edited by Huevos del Toro (log)

--------------

Bob Bowen

aka Huevos del Toro

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Mendocino Mustard, hands down. Sweet and hot and absolutely delicious on virtually anything. There's also a brand of Polish mustard I'm fond of that has horseradish in it. Can't remember the name. Awesome on roast beef, though!

Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

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French's (hey, it has its uses!)

:blink:

Oh?

:blink:

What are they?

:unsure:

"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

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