Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

The Worst 'Wines' in the World


Lord Michael Lewis
 Share

Recommended Posts

Note only that they're all pioneers in terms of sealing the bottle to elimate the off taste odor of a corked wine. Someday they'll be honored for their groundbreaking work in that area or my name's not George.

Robert Buxbaum

WorldTable

Recent WorldTable posts include: comments about reporting on Michelin stars in The NY Times, the NJ proposal to ban foie gras, Michael Ruhlman's comments in blogs about the NJ proposal and Bill Buford's New Yorker article on the Food Network.

My mailbox is full. You may contact me via worldtable.com.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

"Strawberry Cisco has a bouquet similar to that of Frankenberry cereal fermented in wine cooler with added sprinkle of brandy for presentation."

Could this be the evolution of taste?

My one experience with any of these was when I was in the 8th grade, my parents went out for the evening and I threw a party :wacko::shock::rolleyes: at which WIR was consumed. It was nasty and disabused me of thowing any more parties until I was well into high school :biggrin:

John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, there was that gallon of cheap sherry of which I consumed the better part back in the fifties when I was around seventeen years of age. The vomiting that resulted is still somewhere in the recesses of my memory.

Then there were the two bottles of "Flame Tokay", a cheap wine of that name, that a friend, my future wife, and I consumed on our way to help butcher a beef critter a friend of mine had slaughtered. I remember losing the driver's side door to a snow bank backing down a hill that I hadn't crested on the first try on our way into my friend's place. Then, once there, I remember giving my father's meat saw to John where we were to do the butchering. The next thing I remember is being upstairs on the couch with a good friend's woman. That part was okay, my friend had never hesitated to partake of the pleasures of some of my "girlfriends" in the past.

It was when my future wife Katie came upstairs and found Martha and I in a somewhat heated state of affairs that things turned for me. I reluctantly left Martha and resumed my place at the cutting table with Katie at my side.

The moral of this story is not to drink cheap wine and, if you must, beware of the consequences.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

While pondering what ever happened to Ripple, I flashed back to a series of nights in the early 60's when a "rose by any other name" caused me to lose my car for 2 days. It was fortunately found by a friend in a neighboring town parked on the square.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

One factual error in the website -- MD 20/20 was never really called "Mad Dog." It was Mogen David and originally marketed as a kosher wine, suitable for the hollidays. Several of my friends still recall their first experience with wine, after haveing been Bar/Bat Mitzvah'd, as being a hangover-inducing bout with Mad Dog during the Jewish hollidays.

I still recall Gallo Pink Chablis as my favorite. Slightly frizzante and relatively weak, I could knock back a bottle before a high school dance and change fron nerd boy to dancing fool in about 20 minutes.

I'm on the pavement

Thinking about the government.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This reminds me of a sherry that was sold in off licences in the UK in the early 70's

In a desperate attempt to make it sound like Amontillado, the sherry had the alluring name of Armadillo sherry and was sold from a huge plastic vat from which you could fill up any recepticle you happened to bring with you be it an old pop bottle or a milk bottle.

If I recall it was 10p per pint.

S

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I still recall Gallo Pink Chablis as my favorite.  Slightly frizzante and relatively weak, I could knock back a bottle before a high school dance and change fron nerd boy to dancing fool in about 20 minutes.

Do they still make Cold Duck? Probably so. What a headache!

I'm hollywood and I approve this message.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...