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Roe


tissue
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Tobiko caviar for me...love the color!

It has been a childhood favorite.

You were eating roe as a child?!

I read that children and elderly people were supposed to avoid raw seafood and roe...Have you ever heard that? Heres something to that effect...

To prevent foodborne illness, pregnant women, older Americans, young children and people with weakened immune systems should not eat raw seafood such as:

Raw fish (sushi or sashimi)

Raw shellfish--oysters, clams, scallops, mussels or ceviche

Seafood ordered undercooked or "rare" such as tuna carpaccio

Edited by awbrig (log)
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Definitely ikura - but that's because I am just a few weeks away from hauling in my first salmon of the season, can't wait...

Also really like salmon soft roe - breaded in panko and fried like little nuggets. Sperm McNuggets, as the joke goes in the kitchen. Some of our guests are less easily amused.

Anyone tried this?

Edited by butterchik (log)

Jenna Dashney

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Fish roe is ikra in Russian. I suspect the Japanese adopted this word, inserting the customary u (as in isukurimu). So, in Japan, is ikura fish roe in general (as it is in Russian), or is it used only for salmon eggs?

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Tobiko caviar for me...love the color!
It has been a childhood favorite.

You were eating roe as a child?!

I read that children and elderly people were supposed to avoid raw seafood and roe...Have you ever heard that? Heres something to that effect...

To prevent foodborne illness, pregnant women, older Americans, young children and people with weakened immune systems should not eat raw seafood such as:

Raw fish (sushi or sashimi)

Raw shellfish--oysters, clams, scallops, mussels or ceviche

Seafood ordered undercooked or "rare" such as tuna carpaccio

Yeah.... my grandmother is Japanese so we ate a lot of that stuff growing up. And my dad had a fishing boat so I ate a lot of raw seafood. Uni, lobster, sashimi. Which goes to show, that you gotta start the little kiddies early if you want them to appreciate all types of food. I was pretty healthy too, no major illness, no high cholesterol considering all the shellfish I ate.

I think I liked ikura as a kid because I was attracted to the bright pretty color and marble-like look to it.

I like this dried fish roe too. I forgot what it's called and have only had it in asia. It comes in 2 rather large lobes (like an elongated heart) and it's mustard colored. You have to slice it and eat it with daikon and maybe garlic. The texture is mealy. Can anyone help me here with the name?

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Yes ikura did come from the Russian word for coe, but it Japan it refers only to salmon roe.

In the US I was addicted to tobiko, I loved the crunch of it, but it is really hard to find in Japan :wink:

tissue are you maybe thinking of kazunoko? It is yellow in color and is sliceable, it is very popular around New Years, this is my husband's favorite.

In Japan young children eat sushi, no problem. My kids have been eating ikura since the age of 1 and all there would probably claim it as their favorite food. The most popular suashi for kids (as seen on the kid's meals at sushi places) is ikura, maguro (tuna), ebi (shrimp-cooked, though my kids prefer ama-ebi) and cucumber roll.

My kids ages 7, 5, and 2 eat every kind of fish both cooked and raw. Just a little while ago my 2 year old ate a whole pack of hotate (scallops) while my back was turned!!

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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What's your favorite fish roe?

I'm going with huevos de choco if only because it was a new discovery in Sanlucar de Barrameda, Spain and I can't get it in NY. Choco is cuttlefish or seppia, I believe, certainly something from the greater squid family. It came boiled or poached and served with a vinaigrette sauce. They poach the roe sac, or maybe it's the milt, but it's clearly "eggs" on the menu and slice it in thick sections.

Robert Buxbaum

WorldTable

Recent WorldTable posts include: comments about reporting on Michelin stars in The NY Times, the NJ proposal to ban foie gras, Michael Ruhlman's comments in blogs about the NJ proposal and Bill Buford's New Yorker article on the Food Network.

My mailbox is full. You may contact me via worldtable.com.

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Bux, that sounds incredible!

Let's not forget the fish in japan served with their eggs, or in most cases eggs served with part of the fish!

komochi-karei (flounder with eggs)

shishamo (small fish served whole, usually grilled, with a swollen belly of eggs)--my kids love these and eat the whole thing head to tail!

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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My favourite is a New Years only treat- tai-no-ko (sea bream roe?). My MIL simmers and flavours it like the regular New Years tarako (cod roe), so it tastes similar but the texture is much better- more firm with a bit of crunch.

Otherwise ikura, tarako and mentaiko (spicy cod roe) are my favourites.

I love shishamo- the only fish I can eat guts and all, from head to tail. I used to eat these so much I kind of got sick of them so I haven't had them in a while. Time to start eating them again!

We once ordered grilled sanma (saury) that was really expensive. When we ate it we found out why- it had eggs! As I recall, the flavour was not unlike shishamo eggs, but they were sticky and stringy like natto. If this sounds gross then I'm just not explaining it well- it was great!

I've never seen sanma with eggs since then.

My eGullet foodblog: Spring in Tokyo

My regular blog: Blue Lotus

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Mentaiko, a spicy cod roe, is probably the one I use the most. I make potato salad with it, eat it plain with white rice, put it into chiges (Korean style stew/soup dish) and my absolute favorite mentaiko spaghetti! :biggrin:

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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In the US I was addicted to tobiko, I loved the crunch of it, but it is really hard to find in Japan :wink:

Kristin:

Are you sure? Tobiko should be easily found at sushi restaurants in/around Tokyo?

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In the US I was addicted to tobiko, I loved the crunch of it, but it is really hard to find in Japan :wink:

Kristin:

Are you sure? Tobiko should be easily found at sushi restaurants in/around Tokyo?

I have seen it is sushi shops, but not to the extent that I saw it in the US.

It is almost impossible to find in supermarkets.

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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I agree with Torakris- tobiko is not nearly as common here in Japan as it was back home. Come to think of it, I've never ordered or seen it in Japan! But I've only ever been to a 'real' high-priced sushi restaurant a few times, we usually just go to kaitenzushi or get take-out/delivery.

Tobiko is so pretty, mild and crunchy- it might be a favourite if I ate it more often.

My eGullet foodblog: Spring in Tokyo

My regular blog: Blue Lotus

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  • 11 months later...

I have been eating a lot of roe recently,

last night we had karei (type of sole) with the egg sacs still attached, I simmered this with some mistuba, it is a favorite at our house.

This is what the fish loos like before cooking:

http://www.shun-mall.co.jp/goods/5077.htm

This morning I made onigiri for my husband with flaked salmon and some mentaiko (spicy cod roe), I think I may make some for myself as well.... :biggrin:

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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  • 8 months later...

I made a lovely dipping sauce today for cold udon noodles with mentaiko (spicy cod roe) an egg yolk, some thinly sliced scallions and a bit of noodle dipping sauce (made with tsuyu (seasoned soy sauce).

I have an unbelievable amount of mentaiko on my hands and am getting really creative with it. :biggrin:

I wanted to add it to the noodles somehow but I thought that the mentaiko and dipping sauce alone would be too watery, so I added an egg yolk for substance.

Actually the mentaiko, egg yolk and negi with maybe a drop of soy would make a great topping for tofu (either hot or cold), I am going to try that soon.

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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  • 2 weeks later...
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