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Japanese Foods--nabe


Jinmyo
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I just ran across a new nabe that I was unfamiliar with, it is called jyoyanabe (sometimes called tokoyanabe) and is basically a pork and spinach nabe with a broth very heavy on the sake. It also seems to have a lot of ginger and/or garlic in the broth as well. Though pork and spinach are the mains, recipes vary widely on the other ingredients (if any). Similar to shabu shabu is is normally eaten with either a ponzu or goma sauce.

This sounds like a quite economical nabe and can't wait to give it a try! :biggrin:

picture and recipe (in Japanese):

http://www.gekkeikan.co.jp/foodfood/cook/joyanabe.html

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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After reading through a couple recipes here is a general description.

This would be best cooked in a donabe (clay pot) at the table but could be made in a wide saucepan on the stove.

Figure about 100 to 200grams (about 1/4 to 1/2 lb) thinly sliced pork per person and a half a bunch of spinach per person.

Fill the pan with 2 to 4 cups of water and add a piece of kombu (kelp), turn on the heat and bring just to a simmer, removing the kombu before it starts to boil, then add sake to equal the amount of water added, some recipes call for less sake. At this point you can also add ginger and or garlic (minced, sliced or whole your preference) and let this simmer for a little while to burn off some of the alcohol.

It can either be eaten shabushabu style where diners dip the food into the pot themselves until desried doneness or it can be eaten regular nabe style where all the ingredients are cooked together and and diners pick out what they want.

Other additions to the nabe can be shiitake, enoki, aburage, negi (long scallions) or thin noodles.

It seems to be me most commonly eaten with either ponzu or goma sauce, but I did see soem recipes just calling for shichimi. Other recipes also added some soy sauce to the broth or used dashi instead of the konbu.

Good luck!

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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Actually udon is one of the most common noodles eaten in nabe, usually added at the end to finish the meal, but there are a couple nbae style dishes wher the udon is more of a focal point. Noodles I have never seen in nabe are soba, somen, hiyamugi and ramen, though the Koreans have a nabe that uses ramen noodles.

Other noodles used in nabes include shirataki (made from konnyaku starch) and harusame (or other noodles made from potatos or green adzuki beans).

Adding natto to it would make it a natto nabe!

I have never seen that before in Japan, but I have heard of Korean nabes that add natto.

The fun thing about nabe is that you can add anything you want to! :biggrin:

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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  • 2 months later...

Tonight is Christmas Eve and we're having shabu-shabu.

Lasagna is the traditional Xmas Eve dinner back home but I find it a bit heavy for the night before the Xmas day feast (or, to be more truthful, my lasagne is not nearly as good as my moms so I just don't bother!). So shabu-shabu is light enough not to seem like overkill, but still special.

My husband is insisting on beef rather than pork so I may have to forget my no-beef rule (and since BSE has now been discovered in the US, I might as well get Japanese beef!).

My eGullet foodblog: Spring in Tokyo

My regular blog: Blue Lotus

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  • 9 months later...

Have we had a nabe day here in this forum yet? The okonomiyaki day was a great success, now that the weather is getting colder it definitely has me thinking about a hot pot.

I went to a yakiniku party the other day and we are already setting up dates for nabe parties!

This is the one thing I really like about cold winter days!

"Live every moment as if your hair were on fire" Zen Proverb

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What? There is a nabe day? Well then... November 7th sounds like a good day to me! Do I need to decorate the nabe tree? :wink:

November 7th is a Sunday, how does that sound to everyone?

"Live every moment as if your hair were on fire" Zen Proverb

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torakris and dougery,

I have no objection if you'll just let me explain.

It is Yamaki http://www.yamaki.co.jp/ (Japanese only) that has declared November 7 Nabe no Hi (Pot Day).

Reason: Rittou (first day of winter) often falls on November 7.

For a brief explanation of rittou, go to:

http://www2.sanmedia.or.jp/y-kokusai/newpage9.htm

(Scroll down to view the English version.)

A table listing all 24 seasons both in Chinese and Japanese

http://www.sizes.com/time/cal_CJsolar.htm

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I don't really use recipes for any of my hotpots, but the best place to get some ideas would be from the nabe thread linked above. I think there are some recipes over there....

I am sure any cuisines hotpot would work, it makes it more fun that way!

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

I just hit the motherlode (literally). I was visiting my parents this last weekend and found out that my mother went matsutake hunting. She then handed me about 2 lbs of fresh matsutake!!! I cooked some immediately but will freez the rest for hot pot day.

These are huge stalks and caps. I can't wait for November (I hope there will be some left by the time Nov 1st rolls around: )

"Live every moment as if your hair were on fire" Zen Proverb

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  • 2 weeks later...

Just finished our nabe. We did ishikari-nabe, a Hokkaido specialty. It starts with a kombu dashi flavoured with sake, soy sauce, miso (I used a mix of red and white), and tiny amounts of butter and garlic. There are actually several versions of ishikari-nabe, but we prefer this rich, slightly decadent recipe. Ingredients for this nabe vary, but every version contains salmon.

gallery_7940_336_1099748226.jpg

The ingredients: top left basket: hiratake (oyster mushrooms), chingen-sai (bok choy), potatoes, salmon, daikon; top right basket: scallops, shiitake, negi (scallion), carrots, enokidake (straw mushrooms); bottom basket: hakusai (Chinese cabbage), tofu, mame-moyashi (soybean sprouts), thinly sliced pork; shichimi, butter, corn and sliced negi are on hand as well.

gallery_7940_336_1099748260.jpg

Here is my first bowl. About to be sprinkled with shichimi and negi. With a teeny pat of butter on the scallop and potato. Mmmm...

gallery_7940_336_1099748286.jpg

When the ingredients are used up, we add fresh parbroiled ramen noodles and any leftover corn and mame-moyashi. This is a lot like Sapporo ramen and is a great way to finish the nabe.

My eGullet foodblog: Spring in Tokyo

My regular blog: Blue Lotus

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