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Moving to France to work


jeniac42
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Not to rain on your parade,but I have tried for almost to years to find sponsership to get papers to work in France, in the restaurant/ hospitality industry.

It is to expensive for indepenent restaurants to sponser a U.S. working visa, plus in doing so they have to justify hireing you over a french, then EU worker. Which is not easy considering the unemployement right now. Plus why hire an american chef, when france has the best chefs around.

I have found 18 month internships to Switzerland, which is not part of the EU, but you pay for your visa, $700+.

As for the student/teacher theroy to get a student visa it has to be through a accredited school

Sorry, but I hope this helps.

Elizabeth

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I share Claude's opinion that it used to be illegal, but is no longer. I know quite a few people with dual French/US citizenship.

I can second this. I'm currently waiting for my Italian passport ( :laugh: ), without having to renounce my US citizenship. I'm also qualified for French (assuming I pass the language requirement), and Greek (I was born there - don't ask) citizenship.

Every country has different criteria on this, and they change based on current events (which means if any US citizen qualifies and is interested, they shouldn't delay in applying).

Claude:

Was curious about the German requirement myself. If you can read German, here are the details:

german citizenship info

or:

dual US-German nationality explained (English)

From what I gather, Germany is a bit tougher than the other EU countries, but then I don't know your personal circumstances. Check it out.

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You could follow Ms Chu, and do a Diploma at Cordon Bleu

jackal10, Louisa - or even lou.

jeniac42, yes, you could stage at the best restaurants in France with a diploma from Cordon Bleu - some of them even pay under the table.

But you could just come over and probably work off the books down south in the high season - but only at small businesses.

But sorry, either way, forget about lining up a real job someplace good.

No quarantine for dogs coming into France, but there are other advance requirements. France - Customs - Dogd

Nor for the UK but even lengthier advance UK - Pet Travel Scheme

Edited by loufood (log)
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I apologize in advance for veering slightly off topic, but since the vein of this discussion leads this way...

I was wondering if anyone knew what the citzenship requirements are for the UK

(I am Canadian, with an english-born maternal grandfather and a bevy of scots and irish on the paternal side but no closer than great-great-grandparents.)

I hope someone can help me with this...

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I apologize in advance for veering slightly off topic, but since the vein of this discussion leads this way...

I was wondering if anyone knew what the citzenship requirements are for the UK

(I am Canadian, with an english-born maternal grandfather and a bevy of scots and irish on the paternal side but no closer than great-great-grandparents.)

I hope someone can help me with this...

The rules are complex,, but I believe that one of your parents must have British Citizenship. Its possible that your mother may have inherited that from her father (if she was not illegitimate), but I think she (or her parents) would need to have made that claim and held dual nationality.

The rules for right to abode and work are different, as are the rules if your parents were Crown service.

Edited by jackal10 (log)
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