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Seared Foie Gras on Brioche with braised cabbage and rhubarb Jus.

If I remember correctly the Rhubabrb Jus was made by sweating rhubarb, celery, and shallot(not much shallot) in butter, degalze with a bit of riesling reduce Au Sec(almost dry) and simmering in Veal stock(Brown chicken stock would work) until desired flavor and viscosity are met. If you get flavor before viscosity tighten up with a bit of arrowroot. It was served last year, so I may have added or forgotten something, I really need to start writing stuff down. :shock:

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  • 2 weeks later...
It's rhubarb season here in the UK, but it's something I never cooked living in the States. Does anyone have a great recipe... not necessarily a crumble or fool?

i think one of the best ways to falvour the crisp taste of rhubarb is through a jelly.

1lb of rhubarb - the redder the better

40gr sugar

6gr natural (unflavoured) gelatin

roughly cut the rhubarb and place in a saucapan with the sugar and roughly 20-30ml of water. place over medium heat and stew until the rhubarb has completely broken up - 10-15min. strain through a mesh sieve or cheesecloth - make sure you don't pass the pulp through the sieve as all you want is a clear pink liquid - you should make roughly 250ml of it. taste the rhubarb juice - at this point you can increase the sugar level if you want - ensuring it is completely dissolved. (i like a very sharp rhubarb flavour, more true to its nature, than excessively sweetening it)

dissolve the gelatin in 250ml water and mix with the 250ml of rhubarb juice. (you can decrease the qty of water if you prefer)

pour into molds and set overnight. by using rounded molds you can achieve a nice and simple presenation. when serving, dip the molds into hot water for a few seconds, this will release the jelly, invert onto a white plate and serve.

enjoy it with some good single or double cream on the side - a shortbread cookie also workd well.

-che

Edited by CheGuevara (log)
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My favorite way to enjoy rhubarb is a strawberry rhubarb pie. I made one last week, from a recipe found on the net, and it was very good - not too sweet and not too tart. Straight rhubarb, in anything, is a bit too tart for me - and I love tart foods.

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Thanks for the jelly idea, Ernesto. We Yanks are pretty skilled when it comes to gelatin, and this sounds like a good approach. Rhubarb is probably the only flavour that Jello doesn't sell. :-)

And rhubarb pie - very American and makes me homesick. Thanks for the ideas!

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It's rhubarb season here in the UK, but it's something I never cooked living in the States. Does anyone have a great recipe... not necessarily a crumble or fool?

I roasted some rhubarb with demerara sugar and cinnamon last weekend, then mashed it with fork and mixed with some whipped double cream. I served this rhubarb fool on top of meringue nests (M&S ones are nice and chewy, Walkers' are crispy and dry) and garnished with a mint sprig. They disappeared from the table in no time :smile:

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In honor or Mothers Day I've added my grandother's Rhubarb Custard Pie to RecipeGullet.

I also like a very simple Rhubarb sauce. I cube up maybe 8 cups of Rhubarb and mix with 2 cups of sugar and a little water and cook on the stove until the sauce sheets off a spoon. This goes great with yogurt, icecream or pork chops etc. You name it. Good stuff.

I just wish the season was longer. :wub:

My soup looked like an above ground pool in a bad neighborhood.

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My favorite is strawberry rhubarb pie, though rhubarb alone is nothing to be sneezed at.

I was trying to find the recipe my mother used to make for a cake with rhubarb, I'll try to track it down and post it tomorrow.

In the meantime looking through my recipes on mastercook I found one I like for Amish Rhubarb Pudding, that uses a batter, over which you sprinkle the rhubarb and boiling water. It makes one of those great pudding cakes, lovely with cream of some sort.

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  • 10 months later...

Klary posted the following in the Dinner! thread:

[...]No March dinner is complete without rhubarb  :smile:[...]

So I thought it would be a good time to bump this thread. I'm particularly interested in reading more savory rhubarb recipes.

Michael aka "Pan"

 

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Rhubarb and foie gras is one of my favorite pairings.

Seared foie with a savory rhubarb tart, rhubarb/thyme ice cream, rhubarb "glace".

Its one of the ingredients I look forward to in the all-amazing season that is Spring!

-Chef Johnny

John Maher
Executive Chef/Owner
The Rogue Gentlemen

Richmond, VA

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  • 2 months later...

Can anyone here help me find a post (or poster) with a gorgeous rhubarb upside down cake? It looked like a tile mosaic with rhubarb sliced into little rectangles. It may have been in the Dinner thread, but that's a lot of pages to muck through. The post was earlier this year.

Thanks!

Bridget Avila

My Blog

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From Zoroastrianism, the religion of ancient Persia:

Across the river lived the first man, Gayomard, bright as the sun. Angra Mainyu also killed him. Ouch! The sun purified his seed for forty years, which then sprouted a rhubarb plant. This plant grew into Mashya and Mashyanag, the first mortals.

doc

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I had an amazing little rhubarb dish in a restaurant the other week. A fairly simply rhubarb compote, the sweet and sour nicely balanced, topped with a quenelle of Gorgonzola mousse. The mousse was light and creamy but not too airy, and again, a good balance of saltiness and creamy sweetness. It was difficult to decide wether this was a sweet or a savory dish, but the parmesan crips on top told us it was meant to be savory.

There´s a (bit blurry :sad: ) pic of it on my Dutch blog here

Anyway, an unexpected combination (for me) and one I want to try and duplicate at home!

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From Zoroastrianism, the religion of ancient Persia:

Across the river lived the first man, Gayomard, bright as the sun. Angra Mainyu also killed him. Ouch! The sun purified his seed for forty years, which then sprouted a rhubarb plant. This plant grew into Mashya and Mashyanag, the first mortals.

doc

So much better than clay; thank you for this!

"Viciousness in the kitchen.

The potatoes hiss." --Sylvia Plath

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I have not had the chance to read all the way through this rhubarb thread and hope I am not repeating when I offer my favorite spring and early summer dish!

I have eaten stuffed vine leaves in rhubarb since I was a kid and had no idea people made them any other way ..Right now in my garden my grape leaves are bursting and I almost get more excited about their potential use than my actual grapes! and go figure my rhubarb hill is producing like crazy..the garden works in mysterious ways!!!! ..so it is time to take down my big pot and get some stuffed vine leaves going ...

If you have not tried stuffed vine leaves steamed with rhubarb ..here is my very easy recipe as an offering to a very delicious meal!!!

I am not sure where this actually came from I have been given recipes for the stuffing and over the years just put this one together that we like best ...but it is like meatloaf make it like you like it!!!

Stuffed Vine leaves with rhubarb

1.5 lb ground lamb (or chicken, beef, goat, pork .or even a veggie filling by just using some tabouli or cooked rice and lentils ..with extra seasonings) whatever you like actually)

2/3 cup of basmati rice uncooked but rinsed

4 cloves garlic minced

1.5 tsp fresh ground allspice berries

1/2 tsp fresh ground cinnamon (you can add more I just prefer less)

1/2 cup pine nuts

1 handful fresh mint leaves minced

1 handful fresh parsley minced

1 tsp dried oregano

1 tsp Kosher salt

2 tsp fresh cracked pepper (fine cracked)

1 heaping tsp of crushed red hot chile pepper (not traditional but really good in there)

1/4 cup good olive oil (especially if the lamb is really lean)

mix everything together well

dice about 4 or so cups of rhubarb (I just use as much as I think I can get in and around the stuffed vine leaves) and set aside

either jarred (I have never used these so am not sure if you have to rinse them or not?)

or fresh grape leaves

I use fresh and just toss about 50 leaves into a a pot of boiling salted water turn off the heat and let them sit for just a few moments then rinse them lay them out on a towel to dry a bit while I cut away the touch veins in the leaves

then roll up the filling inside the leaves like short cigar or tiny burrito stack into a steamer

that has about a cup of the diced rhubarb on the bottom then as you are stacking them in toss more of the rhubarb around the stuffed leaves then top with the remaining rhubarb before closing the steamer

I do not have a special "steaming" device and use either a colander that fits in the pot of water with a lid.. that has some marbles tossed in (so I can hear if the water runs out) with a lid ...or if making a double batch my Chinese bamboo steamer as well

Steam for about 45 min to an hour taste one at the 45 min level and see if they are done

serve ( at room temp is best I think) with the rhubarb on top of the vine leaves ...

other things I do with rhubarb

-make very good wine :biggrin:

-make rhubarb lamonade (just simmer rhubarb...then press the juice through a strainer into your favorite lemonade for the pinkest tastiest drink!) add a shot of white rum to make a wonderful cocktail

-eat it raw as I pick it :shock:

-add it to beef stew

-make a sauce of mashed fresh cooked rhubarb and serve like applesauce with pork

-chutney

-all types of desserts pies, crisps and my coworkers fav rhubarb with ginger cobbler

-used it instead of tamarind in SE Asian Curries when I did not have tamarind ...

-cold soups ..

I will stop now I adore rhubarb!!!

Edited by hummingbirdkiss (log)
why am I always at the bottom and why is everything so high? 

why must there be so little me and so much sky?

Piglet 

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My rhubarb is in full swing, so I finally read through this whole thread and found it, as egullet so often is, enlightening. I learned, for example, to love my green rhubarb and stop trying to make it red. I thought there was something wrong with my cultivation practices, but now I realize it's the Victoria strain and is meant to be green. Once I stopped adding berries to make it pink, I discovered that it is truly delicious--much more than the pink variety I also have growing. And once I got off the pink bandwagon, it actually occurred to me that apple pie, for example, is not pink. My eyes are open to new possibilities!

I have not, however, been able to roast rhubarb to my liking. It ends up tasting salty and harsh to me, even with additional sweetening (and no added salt).

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I love rhubarb. I hate strawberry-rhubarb pie.

I hold that if you can't take the pleasantly astringent flavor of rhubarb on its own, then don't eat it. And please don't screw it up for those of us who love it by combining it with too-sweet strawberries.

Then you use maple syrup as a sweeterner!

mmmmmm

Jim

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