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French Onion Soup


Marlene
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Since I'm on a soft foods diet for the next couple of days, i thought I might French Onion Soup tomorrow. Tea is about all I can handle right now :biggrin: . I've always used just regular cooking onions to make it, French Onion Soup but it occured to me that spanish onions might also be a good choice.

anyone have a favourite onion they use when making this soup?

Marlene

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Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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i use a mix of spanish and sweets - maui, oso.

sometimes i just slice them suckers up - other times i will make roasted garlic and onion soup and coarsely chop the onions up in the blender. since you are on soft foods you might want to go the puree route.

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Linda Ellerbee

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the stronger the onion the better. I use big old nasty white ones. Then slowly caramelize. The stronger onions don't end up strong if they are slowly cooked. They gain a sweetness and flavor that is unmatched IMHO. If you add in some red onion, it seems to add a little different flavor note. I have tried the sweets (Maui, 1015s) and the flavor was weak.

Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

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Marlene, this is a really good question. I've been wondering the same thing, because I have conflicting advice from my cookbooks.

In her book Bistro Cooking, Patricia Wells advises to use white onions, such as Bermuda onion, because "yellow onions can turn bitter."

However, most other recipes I have advocate using yellow onions, on the basis that white onions -- particularly "sweet" varieties like Vidalias -- will not caramelize properly.

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I have used yellow onions a lot, before I found out the whites were better, and have never had them turn bitter. And I REALLY caramelize the onions. (Maybe Wells was using French yellow onions. Errr... I will resist going there.) They just don't have the flavor that the whites do. The Texas 1015 sweets are a yellow onion. So are the ones I have gotten in Maui.

Years ago, my mother grew something called Egyptian onions. They looked like green onions on steroids and you used the white part. Boy! Were they strong! You had to cut them up under the hood or outside. When they were slowly cooked in butter they made about the most delicious onion dish I ever had. I have always wanted to make onion soup out of those puppies. Does anyone know what I am talking about? Better yet, where I can get some?

Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

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Years ago, my mother grew something called Egyptian onions. They looked like green onions on steroids and you used the white part. Boy! Were they strong! You had to cut them up under the hood or outside. When they were slowly cooked in butter they made about the most delicious onion dish I ever had. I have always wanted to make onion soup out of those puppies. Does anyone know what I am talking about? Better yet, where I can get some?

I believe what you've described is what we call Mexican green onions in these parts. I can get them at local farmers' markets and/or Hispanic mercados. They're wonderful, but very, very strong -- just as you said. In the Catalan region of Spain, I've had them roasted or grilled and served with Romesco sauce. Awesome combination. Romesco sauce is also fabulous with roasted asparagus . . . :smile:

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