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Ideas for using up hard boiled eggs


torakris
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The kids are coloring easter eggs today so soon I am going to have a refrigerator full of hard boiled eggs.

Any creative ideas of what to do with them?

I get tired of egg salad, deviled eggs and egg curries!

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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Have you ever tried pickling them? After you finish a jar of pickles, you just put the hard-boiled eggs in the liquid.

All sorts of salads benefit from the addition of sliced or chopped hard-boiled egg.

They are, of course, an essential element of chopped liver.

Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
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Chopped with sauteed mushrooms on toast.

Bibimbap.

"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

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Kristin,

they're essential in a filipino dish I grew up with, which is essentially pork, stewed with whole hard boiled eggs, glazed chestnuts, onions and soy sauce. I think there was pork belly in there too. This is wonderful with steamed rice, and of course it gets better the day after.

and of course, there's always embutido.

Cheers,

Soba

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Deviled Eggs

Empanadas

Make a pie crust dough (about 1/4 inch thick) and cut into circles (about 3 inch diameter)

Mix together some leftover roast beef (or chicken or pork), chopped eggs, minced olives, boiled potato cubes, sauteed onion and garlic, herbs.

Put a spoonful of stuffing onto dough circles and fold the dough to make a half moon.

You can bake these or deep-fry them.

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It's either been too many years since my last Easter Egg Hunt, or at that point in my life I was more interested in the ends (amassing mass quantites of eggs) than the means (why eggs, why a bunny?), but does anyone know how and why Easter Eggs came to relate to Easter Bunnies?

Holly Moore

"I eat, therefore I am."

HollyEats.Com

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It's either been too many years since my last Easter Egg Hunt, or at that point in my life I was more interested in the ends (amassing mass quantites of eggs) than the means (why eggs, why a bunny?), but does anyone know how and why Easter Eggs came to relate to Easter Bunnies?

from Here

The Easter Bunny Bunny

The Easter Bunny is not a modern invention. The symbol originated with the pagan festival of Eastre. The goddess, Eastre, was worshipped by the Anglo-Saxons through her earthly symbol, the rabbit.

The Germans brought the symbol of the Easter rabbit to America. It was widely ignored by other Christians until shortly after the Civil War. In fact, Easter itself was not widely celebrated in America until after that time.

The Easter Egg

As with the Easter Bunny and the holiday itself, the Easter Egg predates the Christian holiday of Easter. The exchange of eggs in the springtime is a custom that was centuries old when Easter was first celebrated by Christians.

From the earliest times, the egg was a symbol of rebirth in most cultures. Eggs were often wrapped in gold leaf or, if you were a peasant, colored brightly by boiling them with the leaves or petals of certain flowers.

Edit: Here's a better article

On a related note, eggs have long been a symbol of rebirth and thus associated with spring celebrations. In the 600s, Pope Gregory the Great forbade the eating of eggs during Lent (the 40 days proceeding Easter), and this helped make eggs a special treat at Easter. Many European cultures also have old customs of decorating eggs and giving them as gifts.
Edited by guajolote (log)
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-Arkansas boiled egg pie

-Stuffed whole inside a meat loaf

-Chopped and used as part of the dressing/stuffing for braciole or flank steak.

-Simmered in Italian style tomato sauce instead of or in addition to meatballs, sausages, etc.

-Cubed and added to chopped meat to make what I believe is called a "Hockfleisse" (sp?) style hamburger.

-Cream the yolks into sweet butter and then add minced white to make a Finnish style egg butter - used to spread on sweet breads baked for Easter.

-I'll second the pickle idea, and add that there are many variations: Make your own brine to pickle like Japanese style pickled ginger, or spiced like an Indonesian pickle, a hotter type chili pickle, sweet pickle, etc.

-Have Greek style egg fights - loser eats the eggs.

-Vegetarian style "chopped liver: process eggs with carmelised onions, sauted mushrooms, walnuts, seasonings, to make a veggie "pate".

-Battered and deep fried as "Scotch" eggs. Tempura eggs?

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Edit: Here's a better article
On a related note, eggs have long been a symbol of rebirth and thus associated with spring celebrations. In the 600s, Pope Gregory the Great forbade the eating of eggs during Lent (the 40 days proceeding Easter), and this helped make eggs a special treat at Easter. Many European cultures also have old customs of decorating eggs and giving them as gifts.

Thanks. Now I know. I am also happy that Easter Bunnies are no longer fodder for the sacrificial altar.

Holly Moore

"I eat, therefore I am."

HollyEats.Com

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On the coloring side, I hear if you dye the egg a background color, let it dry, then mix some oil in with a contrasting color and dye the egg again, you will get a cool marbling pattern.

I think this was in a Martha Stewart Living article, but am not sure.

Ben

Gimme what cha got for a pork chop!

-Freakmaster

I have two words for America... Meat Crust.

-Mario

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On the coloring side, I hear if you dye the egg a background color, let it dry, then mix some oil in with a contrasting color and dye the egg again, you will get a cool marbling pattern.

I think this was in a Martha Stewart Living article, but am not sure.

Ben

COuld you explain a little further Shielke...What kind of oil?

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they're essential in a filipino dish I grew up with, which is essentially pork, stewed with whole hard boiled eggs, glazed chestnuts, onions and soy sauce.  I think there was pork belly in there too.  This is wonderful with steamed rice, and of course it gets better the day after.

Soba, this sounds very nice.

"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

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Here is something

I dont know what the vinegar is for, but it seems similar to what I had read. The key behind a neat marbling in the article was a light background color and then a marbling of another color.

Also, you can draw on your eggs with a wax crayon (clear if you want) and then dye it. the wax rub off afterwards and leave a white space.

Ben

Gimme what cha got for a pork chop!

-Freakmaster

I have two words for America... Meat Crust.

-Mario

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they're essential in a filipino dish I grew up with, which is essentially pork, stewed with whole hard boiled eggs, glazed chestnuts, onions and soy sauce.  I think there was pork belly in there too.  This is wonderful with steamed rice, and of course it gets better the day after.

Soba, this sounds very nice.

thx Jin.

I can't remember the name of this -- maybe Rhea_S or someone else can remember for me. The thing is, I could never get into this dish until late in my childhood. I remember my mom occasionally varying it by putting in dried cuttlefish. The sauce gets all nice and gelatinous, but if I'd make it, I'd probably reduce the amount of soy sauce.

Embutido is kind of like a stuffed meatloaf -- with whole hardboiled eggs, carrots, RAISINS and the usual things that go into a meatloaf, then sliced so that every slice has a little bit of everything.

Soba

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Scotch eggs - wrapped boiled and shelled egg in seasoned sausage meat, dip in beaten egg then in bread crumbs and fry - yummy.

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

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"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

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No cooking ideas right now torakris, but awbrig and others with children, if you wrap rubber bands around the eggs and dip them in the dye, then rewrap and redip, you can make tye-dye patterns!

Noise is music. All else is food.

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Now I'm curious - does anyone else "blow out" raw eggs to use for dyeing (small pinholes on either end, then literally blow out the egg)? I usually do this if and when I need eggs for baking or other cooking just before Easter. Then I've got a supply for kids (or adults) to paint when they come over. They're somewhat more fragile than hard boiled, but they can be saved indefinitely, and you can use non-food colouring, if desired.

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Now I'm curious - does anyone else "blow out" raw eggs to use for dyeing (small pinholes on either end, then literally blow out the egg)?

I do. You make 2 holes at the polar opposite sides of the egg. I usually use a fork tine to make a hole. And then you just blow on one end and the the yolk comes out the other hole. Rinse and dry... :smile:

When we were kids we used to do this and thread a black sting through it. Then 2 people would grap the 2 ends and go on either side of our street with the egg in the middle of the string... giving the appearance that it was floating in the middle of the street! It would freak people out! :laugh:

Edited by awbrig (log)
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You can cook lentils and an onion until the water is boiled off (I do it in a Romertoff), cover it with spinach that's been buttered and nutmeg'd, pour over cream and parm reg cheese - return to oven to melt cheese - and top with hard boiled eggs. Yummm.

And in response to Holly and her eggs and easter question, I have to post this link:

http://www.esquire.com/humor/sedaris/artic...shaves01_1.html

Seems it's a confusing holiday all around.

G

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It would freak people out! :laugh:

You're good at that, dude. :wink:

How about using them in a tapenade--

hard-boiled egg, chopped fine

a pile of combined olives (I think I used a mix of Nicoise and Kalamata last year, easily available in my area)

a few flat anchovies, rinsed, chopped

a good plop of bottled capers, rinsed

a small pile of chopped garlic

a good squeezing of lemon juice

spoonful of Dijon

spoonful of Cognac (I think Cognac is what it was)

a good 1/4 c. or so EVOO

some chopped fresh basil

You know, give it a whirly-round in the processor.

I think we served this with little toasted bits of bread and maybe a schmear of goat's cheese, but I could be mixing my appetizers. I think this was a BA recipe.

Also you can use them in salad dressings with cornichons, etc.

Noise is music. All else is food.

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