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Japanese foods--menrui


torakris
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Da welcome to egullet! :biggrin:

I love tantanmen, there is this incredible tantanmen shop a 3 minute walk from house so I have never considered making it at home! :biggrin: I couldn't find any English recipes but I have a couple in Japanese (have never tried them though) give me a couple days and I will post them translated into English.

For the longest time I thought jahjahmen was a Korean dish, because my Korean friends in the US made it all the time, then when I came to Japan and saw it I assumed they had taken it from the Koreans. :blink: It was only recently I learned it was Chinese in origin. I prefer the Korean version..........and it has been so long now I can't seem to get it right any more. :sad: Again I have a couple recipes in Japanese but I haven't tried them, maybe I will cook it for lunch on Sunday and then post the recipe if it is any good.

Curry ramen I can't help you with.

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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Had kishimen for the first time this Sep in Nagoya. I am surprised that just the thickness of the noodle (versus udon) makes such a HUGE difference to the entire experience. I'm definitely converted to kishimen...now if I can get my hands on it here in North America....no luck yet.

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  • 2 weeks later...
[...]

I have a couple in Japanese (have never tried them though) give me a couple days and I will post them translated into English.

[...]

I have a couple recipes in Japanese but I haven't tried them, maybe I will cook it for lunch on Sunday and then post the recipe if it is any good.

Hi Kristin,

sorry for being impatient, but I'd like to cook tantan (and possibly other) ramen dishes

for helloween :wacko:, and am therefore in need of a few recipes :blink:...

Did you manage to translate any of your recipes in the mean time?

Thanks,

Da

:cool:

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sorry about that! :sad:

I never did get a chance to make it, so I will just pass on the recipe, this version is a very simple soup and all the spice comes from the pork topping.

In a saucepan, heat up

900ml of torigara soup stock, this is a Chinese style chicken stock usually sold in granule form at the store (you could probably substitute chicken broth)

then add

2 Tablespoons of red miso

and stir to dissolve, and then season to taste

In a wok, heat up

1 Tablespoon of sesame oil

then add

1 minced garlic clove

1 minced piece of ginger

1 minced dried chile pepper

1/2 Japanese long onion, minced (substitute scallions)

stir-fry until fragrant then add

200grams ground pork

1/2 of a small bamboo shoot, minced

when the pork has just lost its pinkness add

1 teaspoon tobanjian

2 teaspoons tenmenjian

and stirfry for a couple seconds, then add

180ml of the torigara soup stock

bring to a boil then turn the heat to low and simmer until thickened, season to tase

Boil according to package directions

4 packs of fresh Chinese egg noodles

drain and then place into 4 bowls

pour the hot soup over the noodles and then add the pork mixture

garnish with finely sliced long onion (or scallion) and more tobanjian and/or sliced dried chile pepper

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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  • 4 weeks later...

Hello Kris!

sorry about that! :sad:

I never did get a chance to make it, so I will just pass on the recipe, this version is a very simple soup and all the spice comes from the pork topping.

[...]

when the pork has just lost its pinkness add

1 teaspoon tobanjian

2 teaspoons tenmenjian

[...]

No need to be sad! :biggrin:

I managed to cook your recipe a couple of days ago, and it was

great :raz: (in fact, even my wife liked it) :wink:

I personally added more tobanjian (hot bean sauce)

and tenmenjian (hoi-sin bbq bean sauce) to taste...

Do you have an idea on substituting the torigara? I didn't manage

to get it, and took normal asian-style chicken broth instead.

Any recommendation?

I don't want to look greedy :rolleyes: but how about other recipes?

Thanks,

Da

:cool:

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I managed to cook your recipe a couple of days ago, and it was

great :raz: (in fact, even my wife liked it) :wink:

I personally added more tobanjian (hot bean sauce)

and tenmenjian (hoi-sin bbq bean sauce) to taste...

Do you have an idea on substituting the torigara? I didn't manage

to get it, and took normal asian-style chicken broth instead.

Any recommendation?

I don't want to look greedy :rolleyes: but how about other recipes?

Thanks,

Da

:cool:

I am glad you enjoyed it! :biggrin:

Maybe I will give it a try now :laugh:

For torigara I would substitute either chicken stock (canned or homemade) or water.

I have used just plain water occasionally when I had nothing else in the house and for a dish like this (with lots of flavor) it wouldn't really be noticeable.

What other kinds of recipes are you looking for?

I was trying to put some into egullet recipes section a while back, bu I had browser compatibility problems and was unable to do anything, hopefully the upgrade has fixed that and I can input some more.

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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  • 2 months later...

I was watching a japanese food show a month ago and I saw a ramen restaurant that specialized in ramen soup with soy milk in it.

Has anyone ever tried this? Wonder what it tastes like. They make the soy milk fresh in the back.

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I was watching a japanese food show a month ago and I saw a ramen restaurant that specialized in ramen soup with soy milk in it.

Has anyone ever tried this? Wonder what it tastes like. They make the soy milk fresh in the back.

eeeewwwww!!!

sorry, I am not a big fan of soy milk....

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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I just typed tounyuu ramen (soy milk ramen) in yahoo Japan and came up with 105 hits, some with restaurants some were recipes so you can make it yourself, still look s gross. :blink:

here is a nice picture (3rd picture down):

http://www.committed-jp.com/kickback/food.html

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

i was having trouble finding mentsuyu (noodle soup base), and i'm thinking of improvising.

can i mix a litre of good soy sauce with a sachet of instant dashi? would i be even close?

thanks!

"The cure for anything is salt water: sweat, tears, or the ocean."

--Isak Dinesen

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I am assuming you want a kake-jiru, a noodle broth, rather than a tsuke-jiru, a dipping sauce usually used with cold noodles.

With dashi and soy you are almost there.....

For kake-jiru

bring about 8 cups of dashi just to a boil and then add

2 tsp salt

6 Tbsp soy sauce

2 Tbsp sugar

2 Tbsp mirin

continue cooking until the sugar has dissolved, check the flavor and adjust to your taste.

If you are using instant dashi, you might want to decrease the salt a bit and then add it to taste.

You can use this immediately or cool to room temperature and keep refrigerated for a couple days. This should make enough for 4 bowls of noodles.

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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If you are looking for a good tsuyu at the Asian markets look for this one

i2995.jpg

It is called Ninben tsuyu no moto and it is easily noticeable by its orange label. It will sometimes be referred to as a seasoned soy sauce. It is a 3 bai (triple strength, so it needs to be diluted, though there are a couple things I use it full strength for) type, so you can get a lot of use out of it.

For example fro a kake-jiru you dilute it with 5 times as much water, but only 2 times for a tsuke-jiru.

Dilute it with twice as much water and you have a ten-tsuyu for tempura, with an equal amount of water you can use it for kinpira or simmering fish, though I normally cut it with sake instead of water for simmering fish.

It can also be used as a base for nabe by diluting it with 9 times the amount of water, or for oden with 12 to 14 times the amount, etc, etc....

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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Is Tsuyu a kind of thick soy sauce?

no, actually it is the same consistency as soy sauce, it is just seasoned.

The ingredient list reads:

soy sauce,, bonito flakes, konbu, sugar, salt, and amino acids most likely msg.

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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You can sort of make your own (for use as an all-purpose shortcut seasoning) by...

Filling a largeish kitchen shoyu pourer with equal amounts of mirin and shoyu, until about two-thirds full.

Putting in 2-3 chunks of konbu and 1-2 dried shiitake, maybe a chunk of green ginger. You can also put in katsuobushi etc but that really makes it hard to pour, so if you want to do that, you might want to leave it for a few days and then strain the katsuobushi out. I prefer to add the katsuobushi to the recipe separately if needed, and think the basic mixture keeps better without it anyway.

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You can sort of make your own {mentsuyu} (for use as an all-purpose shortcut seasoning) by...

Filling a largeish kitchen shoyu pourer with equal amounts of mirin and shoyu, until about two-thirds full.

Putting in 2-3 chunks of konbu and 1-2 dried shiitake, maybe a chunk of green ginger. You can also put in katsuobushi etc but that really makes it hard to pour, so if you want to do that, you might want to leave it for a few days and then strain the katsuobushi out. I prefer to add the katsuobushi to the recipe separately if needed, and think the basic mixture keeps better without it anyway.

thanks torakris and helenjp--that was exactly the info i was looking for (with recipes!). :smile:

"The cure for anything is salt water: sweat, tears, or the ocean."

--Isak Dinesen

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Finally found Japanese Kishimen....

In Paris...

In a chinese grocery store....

made in Korea.....

everybody together now! It's a small world afterall, :biggrin:

p.s. my Mexican roomate found chiles ancho and chiles seco for pozole in the same store!

:biggrin::biggrin:

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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  • 4 weeks later...

Sanuki udon, originally from Kagawa prefecture, is rising in popularity all over Japan, here is a little history of the noodles, the rise of the current "boom" and possible plans of the chainstore Hanamaru on expanding to New York:

http://www.jinjapan.org/trends/society/soc040116.html

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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  • 1 month later...
Sanuki Udon!

The real thing in Kagawa is amazing, so much so that I can't eat most regular udon- it's just too soft. I haven't tried any of the new Sanuki places that are popping up in Tokyo, I'm pretty skeptical.

I couldn't agree with smallworld more.

Three years ago, an acquaintance of mine living in Kagawa prefecture, the birthplace of Sanuki udon, sent me a box of frozen Sanuki udon packs. That was the beginning of my love for this particular type of udon. In fact, I don't want to eat any other type of udon any longer.

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I still have yet to try sanuki udon :sad:

I bought a package of it and was planning to eat it last Sunday for lunch, but we endend up BBQing with the in-laws, so it is waiting until this weekend......

I can't wait to try it.

I have also just ordered my first couple packs (of the season) of hiyashi-chuuka, with a sesame flavored sauce, summer and noodles just go together perfectly! :biggrin:

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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  • 2 months later...
I was watching a japanese food show a month ago and I saw a ramen restaurant that specialized in ramen soup with soy milk in it.

Has anyone ever tried this? Wonder what it tastes like. They make the soy milk fresh in the back.

eeeewwwww!!!

sorry, I am not a big fan of soy milk....

i know that soymilk is not for everyone, but i for one love it, and i LOVE it with noodles even more!

a great summertime dish is kong guksu (콩국수)!!

if you dont like soymilk, look away, but if you are partial to the stuff, doesnt this look lovely?

http://restaurant.naver.com/_recommend/the...ages/kong01.jpg

kong guksu is icy cold, freshly made soymilk (not from a box that you can store for years) that is slightly salty. add freshly cooked thick style noodles (udon or freshly pulled jjajjangmyeon noodles will do very well). top with some cukes and dig in!

recipe for kong guksu (soymilk with noodles)

"Bibimbap shappdy wappdy wap." - Jinmyo
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