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Japanese foods--menrui


torakris
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A steaming bowl of Miso Nikomi Udon (popular in Aichi-ken) hits the spot on those cold winter nights...... The handmade noodles offer 'great resistance to the teeth', and the slightly bitter, but rich egg-laden miso broth warms the soul. :biggrin:

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A steaming bowl of Miso Nikomi Udon (popular in Aichi-ken) hits the spot on those cold winter nights......  The handmade noodles offer 'great resistance to the teeth', and the slightly bitter, but rich egg-laden miso broth warms the soul.  :biggrin:

with a deep dark aka miso!! :biggrin:

lannie, welcome to egullet!

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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  • 3 weeks later...

I went out to lunch today with 3 fellow foreign friends to my favorite udon shop.

They make a type of udon called goma udon and is made with the dough from regular udon that has been mixed with a paste of gobo and sesame seeds, leaving it with a speckled look.

My friends all swore it was the best kind of noodle they have eaten in this country and no one had either seen it or heard of it before, curious I just did a search on this particular noodle and only found 2 hits and they were both for this restaurant.

here is a picture (text is all Japanese), it is the second restaurant on the page:

http://www.salus.ne.jp/magazine/backnumber...301/gourme.html

Lucky for me the restaurant is 5 seconds from my house (directly across the street) :biggrin:

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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Kristin, I don't know what to say. That just strikes me as such good fortune for you.

me/ touches screen

"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

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How about Nagasaki sara-udon?  Not really udon; another quasi-Chinese dish.  Deep-fried, as all things should be.

I love this stuff.

It is sort of like an American chop suey, but better and with the noodles on the bottom! :biggrin:

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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Kristin--

a little bit off-topic, but at that link that you posted here...

what are those little deep-fried sticks at the bottom left of the page?

gus

these particular ones are called cheese tsutsumi-age, tsutsumu means to wrap and age is to deep fry, so essentially they are deep fried wrapped things.

The one shown are wraps of cheese (processed cheese), cheese and seaweed, and just daikon, they are wrapped with gyoza (pot sticker)wrappers.

These kind of tsutsumi-age are very popular in Japan and the fillings can consist of pretty much anything.

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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  • 1 month later...

I picked up some wasabi soba and ashitaba soba on our recent camping trip to the Izu penninsula and had the ashitaba for lunch today with some homemade tsuyu and grated daikon. It was quite good.

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

Every now and again, I get a HUGE craving for udon. I've made it a couple times, but I have this distinct proclivity to cook it all off and snarf it down before I know what's happened.

Does anyone else suffer from these symptoms? How do you treat them?

I always attempt to have the ratio of my intelligence to weight ratio be greater than one. But, I am from the midwest. I am sure you can now understand my life's conundrum.

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Every now and again, I get a HUGE craving for udon.  I've made it a couple times, but I have this distinct proclivity to cook it all off and snarf it down before I know what's happened.

Does anyone else suffer from these symptoms?  How do you treat them?

Is the problem making it?

or snarfing it down?

:huh:

I have never had to store udon before.............

it gets eaten so fast :biggrin:

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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The problem is snarfing it down... I feel like a baker who's eaten all of the brownie dough afterward, though... a fair amount of work, and only one full belly to show for it... :sad:

I always attempt to have the ratio of my intelligence to weight ratio be greater than one. But, I am from the midwest. I am sure you can now understand my life's conundrum.

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The problem is snarfing it down...  I feel like a baker who's eaten all of the brownie dough afterward, though... a fair amount of work, and only one full belly to show for it... :sad:

this is a bad thing? :blink:

oh dear.............. :sad:

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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I only eat it one way because of the ease and speed of making. After cooking the udon, I toss them with soy sauce, a little rice wine vinegar, scallions and Thai garlic chili and pepper sauce

I always attempt to have the ratio of my intelligence to weight ratio be greater than one. But, I am from the midwest. I am sure you can now understand my life's conundrum.

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I only eat it one way because of the ease and speed of making.  After cooking the udon,  I toss them with soy sauce, a little rice wine vinegar, scallions and Thai garlic chili and pepper sauce

doesn't sound bad to me! :biggrin:

Maybe you wouldn't feel so guilty if you preapared them in some different ways :blink::biggrin:

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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Dammit. Now I've triggered another udon craving. I'll have to mix some up and eat it before I cook the edamame

I always attempt to have the ratio of my intelligence to weight ratio be greater than one. But, I am from the midwest. I am sure you can now understand my life's conundrum.

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  • 4 weeks later...

Hello there,

I was just nosing around the forums and suddenly got thinking about a TV programme I saw, ooh, must have been about 15 years ago, about a restaurant in Japan, where diners sit at the bottom of a beautifully-manicured sloping hill garden, at the top of which is a little pagoda-style building in which noodles are cooked, then dropped into fresh glacial water, which runs straight down bamboo chutes towards the diners. They then pick the ice-cold noodles out of the water and eat them, with various other dishes brought to the table in a more rtraditional way. It looked fantastic.

the idea of having fresh glacial water running through a restaurant's exciting enough, but to have noodles whizzing past in it makes my mouth water even now.

Did I dream this, or is there anyone out there with any recollection at all of such a place?

Ready to order?

Er, yeah. What's a gralefrit?

Grapefruit.

And creme pot... pot rouge?

Portugaise. Tomato soup.

I'll have the gralefrit.

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I believe you are referring to a summertime pasttime known as Nagashi Somen, though a particularly deluxe version! The somen noodles are sent down bamboo aqueducts (?) and the diners catch them with their chopsticks. Fun for all, especially the inebriated. The cool water has the nice side-effect of chilling the noodles by the time they reach the diners.

Edited by skchai (log)

Sun-Ki Chai
http://www2.hawaii.edu/~sunki/

Former Hawaii Forum Host

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  • 3 weeks later...
So list your favorite ramen as well.

I love one called tantanmen, which has ground meat and a wonderful spicey broth.

[...]

It is quite difficult to find good Tonkotsu ramen shop!

Altough many (even Japanese) have mistakenly included Tantanmen in ramen category, it is NOT.

Here is the link to the pages of other noodles often considered mistakenly as ramen.

Noodles found at chinese restaurant in Japan (and mistakenly considered as type of ramen)

:smile:

Tonkotsu Ramen?

Curry Ramen??

Jahjah Men or Tantan Men???

Does anybody have recipes (in English please :-) for these dishes?

I've been looking for a Tantan Men recipe for nearly 3 years now!

Thanks,

Da

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