Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Japanese foods--menrui


torakris
 Share

Recommended Posts

Zaru-soba.

"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My 2 favorites are probably the 2 least seen out of Japan, kishimen and hiyamugi.

Kishimen is great in soups and nabe type dishes especially with miso.

Hiyamugi is always served cold (hiya=chilled) and is a little thicker then somen with more bite, I like it best with sesame based sauces.

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I wasn't sure what kishimen was so I did a Google search. I found this. I've been buying a Chinese brand of these for years. The kanji on the package says "dan mein" though they weren't really. The English says "Noodle".

Thanks, Kristin. And of course, thanks Google.

"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sanuki Udon!

The real thing in Kagawa is amazing, so much so that I can't eat most regular udon- it's just too soft. I haven't tried any of the new Sanuki places that are popping up in Tokyo, I'm pretty skeptical.

My husband makes a nice udon, not as firm as Sanuki but pretty good. It takes hours though so he needs lot of coaxing and begging first.

Soba is my all-time favourite in all it's forms, hot and cold. Recently I've been preparing a cholesterol-busting version. It's a plate of cold soba topped with grated daikon, natto, sliced shiso and nori, with cold mentsuyu on top. Sliced okra, bottled nametake mushrooms can be added, as can raw egg (cancels out the cholesterol-fighting properties of natto, though) and green onion, yuzu or mitsuba can be used instead of shiso.

This thread has inspired me to make soba for dinner. Which is troubling because moments ago the previous soup thread inspired me to make either suiton or kenchin-jiru.

Ahh, so much good food, yet so few meals...

My eGullet foodblog: Spring in Tokyo

My regular blog: Blue Lotus

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I like ramen noodles in white pork broth. I think that's kyushu style. And of course, curry ramen.

I also like nabeyaki udon soup, with shrimp tempura and mountain vegetables.

the white pork broth is tonkotsu and is my favorite too! :biggrin:

I didn't include ramen in the original list of noodles, because they are of Chinese origin, though they are as Japanese as all the others now.

So list your favorite ramen as well.

I love one called tantanmen, which has ground meat and a wonderful spicey broth.

Smallworld, embarrassed to admit I have never tried sanuki udon, it is a goal for me this summer now! :biggrin:

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So list your favorite ramen as well.

I love one called tantanmen, which has ground meat and a wonderful spicey broth.

Kristin

Experienced over a thousand different ramen shops, I have recently concluded Tonkotsu is not my favorite.

It is quite difficult to find good Tonkotsu ramen shop!

Altough many (even Japanese) have mistakenly included Tantanmen in ramen category, it is NOT.

Here is the link to the pages of other noodles often considered mistakenly as ramen.

Noodles found at chinese restaurant in Japan (and mistakenly considered as type of ramen)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In 12 years in Japan, I have been to 2 ramen shops! :shock:

The tantan men I usually eat is at Chinese restaurants, usuallyat Bamiyan (a Chinese chain on the Denny's level but with decent food).

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, I'll stand by my original Sanuki udon and soba. But I guess it really depends on the purpose of the noodle- is it a snack, meal or side dish?

For a snack or a side dish (more like interlude) for okonomiyaki, nothing beats yakisoba. In all it's forms- the cheap'n'greasy kind found at yatai, with nothing but benishoga, bonito flakes, a few pieces of cabbage and maybe one sliver of pork. Or upscale with seafood and mushrooms, salt instead of sauce. Or any other variations (but hold the mayo, please!).

Not strictly Japanese, but I love harusame. Especially as a salad with cucumber.

And ramen is included in our noodle list, things get can even more complicated. A really good salt-based soup is my current favourite, but it's always changing. I do love tonkotsu as well, and it seems to be the favourite of every non-Japanese ramen-eater. I wonder why?

Toppings? It depends on what kind of ramen, but a few juicy, fatty slices of char-siu and a handful of menma are a must.

My eGullet foodblog: Spring in Tokyo

My regular blog: Blue Lotus

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Toppings? It depends on what kind of ramen, but a few juicy, fatty slices of char-siu and a handful of menma are a must.

We should go have ramen together! :biggrin:

Some of the best udon I have ever had is from this little shop that just opened in front of my house. They specialize in goma (sesame seed) udon, I culd be wrong but I don't think it actually has sesame seeds in it, it just looks like it does.

It is quite thin for udon, similar more to soba and is white with brown flecks, it really has a great bite to it and an incredible flavor.

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That sounds fantastic, the sesame seed udon. In the summer I really like zaru udon dipped into cold thick sesame sauce.

Soba is still my favorite, though. Served any way.

I've never tried ramen. The hype is incredible, though. All my Japanese friends in the U.S. say the first thing they want to eat when they get off the plane is their hometown's ramen.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think it should be obvious what MY favorite is.

LOL

toppings include grated daikon, gomasio, minced scallions, shredded duck meat, nori tempura, cubed tofu, togarashi, furikake, and of course, Mrs. Dash. :blink:

I like the soba served at Honmura An, although some of the little mom and pop places in the East Village are fast becoming favorites as well. There's a really small noodle place on East 13th between 1st and A, can't remember the name of it though. It's on the south side of the street, halfway down the block. They also serve great gyoza.

Cheers,

Soba

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In the summer I really like zaru udon dipped into cold thick sesame sauce.

The restaurants near my place don't have udon like this. I have to prepare it myself at home.

sesame dressings are my favorite for zaru udon, I just made this last week for the kids and I.! :biggrin:

Soba, Mrs. Dash?! :blink:

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What do you usually order at Honmura-an? I'd heard so many good things about that place, but was a bit disappointed the one time I went. I had soba in a cold broth with grated daikon and nameko mushrooms, one of my favorites, but the noodles were really, really short (inhibiting slurping action) and there wasn't much broth.

I really enjoyed the dessert, though - oshiruko, soft mochi in a sweet red bean soup, but with soba dumplings in place of the mochi. It was cute.

I still haven't found a soba place in the city that I really dig. I've been going to Soba Nippon in midtown lately, but I'm not a huge fan. Anyone have other recommendations? I go to Soba-ya to drink the soba beer but that's about it. Have to check out that place on 13th street.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Kristin -- yes, I'm proud to admit it. Mrs. Dash. Besides doing her job to make boneless skinless chicken breasts palatable, she does double duty on just about anything else, including soba. (Rarely though. But I need one vice!!!)

margaret -- I find that the hot soba dishes at Honmura-an work well. Try the soba topped with duck the next time. It's been a while since I've been there. The sizzling soba dish is also a winner. With the hot dishes, you get the added bonus of turning leftover broth in your bowl into a soup with the addition of the cooking water.

Cheers,

Soba

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My favourite is from a shop tucked into the back of the highway truckstop outside Arai city (one of the few places I could walk to from my staff dorm)

Kimchee and Shiro Miso Ramen - nothing better on a winters night.

Certainly not a traditional dish (I think) but makes for damn fine slurping! Anyone else had this combo before?

Jenna Dashney

FRESH BUTTER HERE

Link to comment
Share on other sites

butterchil, but of course. Kimchi saves and blesses.

"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...