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Tempering Chocolate

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45 minutes ago, Rajala said:

I will be in a situation where temperatures reach around 30 degrees celsius, and need to temper in that temperature. At least try to. Anyone got any ideas or suggestions how to handle that? It feels like tempering white chocolate would be the hardest. :S 

I'm curious to see what others suggest to your dilemma. I would either find a way to cool down your workspace to at least 22 degrees celsius (72 F), suggest an alternative to chocolates (popsicles or ice cream), or decline the job. Guess  another alternative is to use compound chocolate/summer coating but very few of those products taste good.

 

Would you be willing to share any more details about this situation and why you are considering an attempt to work with chocolate at 30 C?

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3 hours ago, curls said:

I'm curious to see what others suggest to your dilemma. I would either find a way to cool down your workspace to at least 22 degrees celsius (72 F), suggest an alternative to chocolates (popsicles or ice cream), or decline the job. Guess  another alternative is to use compound chocolate/summer coating but very few of those products taste good.

 

Would you be willing to share any more details about this situation and why you are considering an attempt to work with chocolate at 30 C?

 

You're thinking about something like cooling down a marble slab a bit? That would be a possibility. But it will be outside, so it would still be a higher temperature in the air. It doesn't have to be perfect, I would just need to get the chocolate tempered and I could ret it set in the fridge. If there are some few ugly spots on it, it doesn't matter.

 

It's for a friend, party outside - and it would be a fun thing to do. I'm just thinking about what's possible and how to overcome the biggest challenge with the high surrounding temperature, and thought that there would be some knowledge here. :) 

 

 

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If the temperature is around 30°C (and not above) then tempering is not a big issue. You just need to melt the chocolate with a good advance (say about a couple hours), let it rest at your hot working temperature (30°C) until it reaches it, then temper it via seeding or agitation. Checking temper is mandatory (using a fridge). A cold water bath (water with some ice cubes at about 8-10°C, not iced water at 0°C) can be of help in case the party day will be hotter than 30°C. Beware of thermal inertia: if you cool a bowl with chocolate in a cold water bath, then the chocolate will keep cooling after you take the bowl out of the bath (the bowl reached a lower temperature than the one you are measuring inside the chocolate). This should cover the tempering part.

The big problem is on the rest. Making decorations / sculptures I would say is out of question, too many obstacles. Hand dipping would be a nightmare, since you would need to stop every few pieces. Molded bonbons are doable, you need to put the molds in the fridge before pouring the chocolate to create the shell, but you need to use the molds when they are around 20-22°C, if you use them at fridge temperature then you get a THICK shell. To do so you need to open the fridge and check the temperature at close intervals, but I suppose you will be using a portable fridge (since it's an outside party) dedicated to only this purpose, so you don't risk to ruin the other food in a normal fridge. For the filling, just use a gianduja and forget about the rest to avoid troubles. Capping is the crucial part, if you start with the mold at a low temperature then you ruin everything (chocolate will set immediately and you won't be able to scrape the mold). I would suggest to limit the number of molds to 4 and not above, since you will loose a lot of time cheking their temperatures (this is the case when an infrared thermometer is your best friend). Carry plenty of ice packets inside the portable fridge,  put the molds in a single layer without overlapping them, so check your fridge size (in case ask for a second portable fridge). When talking to party girls don't be chocolatey technical, keep it simple and pretend to be a magician not a technician.

 

 

 

Teo

 

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Teo

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8 hours ago, Rajala said:

I will be in a situation where temperatures reach around 30 degrees celsius, and need to temper in that temperature. At least try to. Anyone got any ideas or suggestions how to handle that? It feels like tempering white chocolate would be the hardest. :S 

 

That sounds like a challenge! Do you know anyone with an anti-griddle?

 

Do you specifically want to make mo(u)lded chocolates, or just do something fun with chocolate for your friend?  Is it meant to be only a demonstration, or will guests take part?

 

Definitely find a shady spot with good air circulation and away from brick or concrete walls or patios that will be heating up in the sun all day.  You could get a few blocks of ice and blow fans over them to generate cold air, that might help.

 

If you're open to things other than mo(u)lding, what about something involving ice cream, since it's going to be so warm out.  Thin milk and dark chocolate down with coconut oil then dip ice cream sandwiches or fruit popsicles in it.  Have a variety of nuts and sprinkles that people can add on. 

 

Or use ice to make the chocolate set and make chocolate bowls to fill with berries and whipped cream (etc)

 

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Thanks @teonzo ! I'll store the moulds in a colder place - seems like that is the key for this.

 

Don't know anyone with that @pastrygirl, but it will be mostly making a simple bonbon or maybe a chocolate bar. Ice cream is a good thing to think about though.

 

 

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