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Suvir Saran

Chocolate Chip Cookies

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A friend made me some chocolate chip cookies this morning.

They are tasty, but skinny and not as chewy as I am used to.

He used the Toll House recipe, I am sure there are other recipes that could give me the result I seek.

Any one out there with recipes you think might be fun for me to try?

Thanks! :smile:

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I love chewy chocolate chip cookies the best too, Suvir. This recipe definitely satisfies my desire for the chewy. :)

Chewy Chocolate Chip Cookies

Yield: 5 dozen

Ingredients

2 c Butter

2 c Sugar (granulated, white)

2 c Brown sugar (dark brown)

4 lg Eggs

2 t Vanilla extract

4 c Flour (sift before measuring)

5 c Rolled oats (oatmeal), powdered finely

1 t Salt

2 t Baking soda

2 t Baking powder

24 oz Chocolate chips

8 oz Chocolate bar, finely grated

3 c Chopped nuts (I prefer walnuts, but use your favorite)

Instructions

1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees F. Cream together the butter and the sugars.

2. Sift together flour, oatmeal, salt, baking soda, baking powder and shredded chocolate bar. Add eggs and vanilla to creamed sugar and butter, then mix all ingredients together. Mix chocolate chips and nuts into mixture.

3. Drop by onto ungreased cookie sheet in small drops. Bake 6 minutes or until done.

NOTES:

Chocolate Chip Cookies like Mrs. Fields makes -- These cookies are a combination of oatmeal and chocolate chip. They are very rich, but very tasty. The recipe was obtained from a friend of a friend, who supposedly paid a large amount of money for it. However, the cookies do not taste exactly the same as the name brand. Yield: approximately 60.

A blender works very well to powder blender chops the oatmeal finer than a chocolate bar should melt at the touch the oats and the chocolate bar. The food processor. The powdered of your fingers.

I prefer my cookies just barely done, so that they remain chewy. If you want to send your taste buds into heaven, butter the cookies as they come out of the oven (still hot), and eat them still warm with a glass of cold milk.

Note that cocoa is not the same thing as a shredded chocolate bar. Note also that oatmeal is not the same thing as quick-cooking oats or instant oatmeal. Oatmeal means "rolled oats," such as Quaker oats.

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Hi Suvir, glad to see you back. I actually like the Nestle recipe (grew up with it) but will add more or less flour depending. Maybe some nut flour too? Did your friend melt the butter?

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Suvir, here's a link to one of Alton Brown's recipes, appropriately named "The Chewy":

Click here

We love these cookies and make them all the time.

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Suvir,

I think this is the recipe you are looking for. It's an honest-to-goodness (that means no funny business like crushed oatmeal, Hershey bars or espresso powder!) chocolate chip cookie that is rich, thick and dense without being cake-like or overly tender.

In the past 2 weeks I have made every cookie recipe listed so far in this thread and this one is the winner. For those who care, here are my preferences in order:

#1. The recipe below and the Chocolate Chip Cookies With Pudding recipe are tied

#2. Recipe on the back of the Tollhouse bag

#3. Neiman Marcus cookies -- the one from their website and the archive, not the oatmeal ones.

#4. Alton Brown's "The Chewy" cookies -- albeit they are not so much chewy as cake-like.

Chewy Chocolate-Chip Cookies (This recipe comes from Fine Cooking magazine -- hope I don't get sued. It's not in the archive).

Yields about 9 dozen 2 1/2-inch cookies.

Notes from the article: I use butter and eggs right out of the refrigerator so the dough stays cool and the cookies maintain their thickness during baking; I also use ungreased cookie sheets. To keep the cookies soft and chewy, store them in an airtight container along with a slice of bread.

10 3/4 ounces (1 1/3 cups) unsalted butter, cold

1 1/2 cups packed light brown sugar

1 cup granulated sugar

2 large eggs, cold

1 T. pure vanilla extract

17 ounces (3 3/4 cups) unbleached all-purpose flour

1 1/4 t. table salt

1 t. baking soda

12 ounces semisweet chocolate chips

Arrange oven racks in the upper and middle positions of the oven. Heat the oven to 375ºF.

Using a mixer fitted with a paddle, beat together the butter, brown sugar, and granulated sugar, starting on low speed and gradually working your way up to high speed until the mixture is light and fluffy, about 3 minutes once you reach high speed. Scrape the bowl and beater. Add the eggs and vanilla and beat on low until blended. Beat on high until light and fluffy, about 1 minute. Scrape the bowl and beater.

In a medium bowl, whisk together the flour, salt, and baking soda. Add this to the butter mixture and stir with a wooden spoon until just blended; the dough will be stiff. Stir in the chocolate chips.

Drop rounded measuring teaspoons of dough about 2 inches apart onto two ungreased baking sheets. Refrigerate any unused dough. Bake until the bottoms are golden brown, 8 to 10 minutes, rotating the sheets halfway through for even results. Remove the sheets from the oven, let sit for 3 to 5 minutes, and then transfer the cookies with a spatula to a wire rack to cool completely. Let the baking sheets cool completely before baking the remaining dough.

Note: I do like the Neiman Marcus ground up oatmeal and Hershey bar recipe, but there's a time and a place for it. It's not a real chocolate chip cookie, but rather an oatmeal hybrid.


Edited by claire797 (log)

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Suvir -- I second the nomination for the Alton Brown chewy cookie recipe with the following note. After you scoop your little mounds of dough, freeze them. Then bake them straight from the frozen state in a hot oven. Also, Guittard makes a product called Super Cookie Chips. They're about twice the size of standard chips and better chocolate . . . unless you want to make your own chunks. They're great if you can find them.

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Not sure where to start...

Thanks All! :smile:

Keep them coming...and yes I shall have to slowly work my way through the many recipes.

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i recently undertook a mission to find the best chocolate chip cookie recipe. I made the neiman marcus cookie, the double tree hotel cookie, something I found on the internet called the world's best chocolate chip cookie, Bill Yoses chocolate chunk cookies (which include vanilla beans and hazelut paste), and a few others I don't remember. They were all very good, but by far my favorite was David Liebowitz's chocolate chunk cookie from his book Room for Dessert. It was very simple, but excellent. I'll have to try Alton Brown's cookie though.

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Suvir -- I second the nomination for the Alton Brown chewy cookie recipe with the following note.  After you scoop your little mounds of dough, freeze them.  Then bake them straight from the frozen state in a hot oven.

We thoroughly chill the dough for several hours before baking it - it makes a huge difference in the chewiness. Will try the freezing next time.

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I've found the Neiman-Marcus cookie recipe at David Leite's website to be terrific, big and chewy.

Thanks for the plug, Plax! Yeah, whenever I'm in need of a little boost, I turn to these babies. I love them.

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How does one make thick cookies? The ones my friend baked were too thin for my liking.

Are there tips on how to ensure thickness??

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How does one make thick cookies?  The ones my friend baked were too thin for my liking.

Are there tips on how to ensure thickness??

Hi Suvir,

Some of the classic ways of making thick cookies are to use more batter per cookie, chill the batter to prevent spread, and add a bit more flour (but this can make the cookies a bit cakey). I'm sure others will chime in with more ways.

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Try chilling the dough a bit before dropping it on the cookie sheet, so that the crops will be thicker to begin with and less likely to spread out thinly as soon as they hit the hot oven. If that doesn't work, try adding a bit more flour, recognizing that there is a consequent loss of richness and the potential for dryness.

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How does one make thick cookies?  The ones my friend baked were too thin for my liking.

Are there tips on how to ensure thickness??

The Neiman Marcus cookies (the ones with the espresso powder) are rather thick as are the Fine Cooking cookies and the pudding cookies. Any of those recipes will give you a thick cookie.

If you want to use the Tollhouse recipe, here are a few tips:

1) Make sure the butter is softened -- not melted. If you have a KitchenAid, you can take butter directly out of the refrigerator and beat it into a frenzy with the whisk attachment. Cold whipped butter will give you a better cookie.

2) Use a little bit of shortening in place of the butter. If a recipe calls for 1 cup of butter, use 3/4 cup butter and 1/4 cup shortening.

3) Chill the dough thoroughly.

4) Don't skimp on the flour, but I wouldn't advise adding extra. Just measure accurately.

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How does one make thick cookies?  The ones my friend baked were too thin for my liking.

Are there tips on how to ensure thickness??

Hi Suvir,

Some of the classic ways of making thick cookies are to use more batter per cookie, chill the batter to prevent spread, and add a bit more flour (but this can make the cookies a bit cakey). I'm sure others will chime in with more ways.

Thanks David!

And hello! :smile:

Thanks to each of you.. I will have lots of baking to do.

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One more thing that no one's mentioned -- parchment paper should decrease the spread on the pan, giving you a thicker cookie. At least I've found this to be true.

I was going to say the same thing as Claire on the shortening, but I personally wouldn't use in my cookies. Have been tempted to try it though.

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Shortening does help make a thicker cookie.

i use all shortening when I am making M &M cookies.

No matter how thick I try to make them the M&M's fall out when I put them on the racks to cool.

They end up being a little on the cakey side but are still quite good.

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I have to chime in on the chilling the dough part. It works everytime to ensure cookies don't spread as much.

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Thanks, Marlene!

Here's a modified version.

Thick and Chewy Chocolate Chip Cookies

4 dozen cookies

1 3/4 cups plus 2 tablespoons unbleached all-purpose flour

1/2 tablesoon salt

1/2 t. baking soda

5 1/2 ounces cold butter

3/4 cup packed light brown sugar

1/2 cup granulated sugar

1 large egg, cold

1 1/2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract

6-8 ounces semisweet chocolate chips

Arrange oven racks in the upper and middle positions of the oven. Heat the oven to 375ºF.

In a medium bowl, whisk together the flour, salt, and baking soda. Set aside.

Using a KitchenAid or very strong mixer with paddle, beat together cold butter, egg and both sugars until fluffy. Beat in vanilla.

Stir flour mixture into butter mixture. Add chocolate chips. Do not overbeat -- stir only until well-mixed.

Drop rounded measuring teaspoons of dough about 2 inches apart onto two ungreased baking sheets. Bake for 8-10 minutes at 375.

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