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Making Sushi


stagis
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I have made the chirashi sushi several times and it is really great on a hot summer day. I don't have things like lotus root available but it's still good.

The wonderful thing about chirashi sushi is that you can add any ingredients you want!

The chirashi sushi thread with lots of pictures!

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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After being consumers for many year, myself and a friend wanted to give it a try. This was the result of our first and only attempt:

Sushi1.jpg

Sushi2.jpg

It was a lot work ... research, getting all the stuff and gear, prep work, etc. It took about 3 hours. Even though it was yummy and fun, I doubt we are doing it again, but hey ... it sure helped to accept restaurant/sushibar-prices more easily.

Actually I wasn't aiming for nigiri, otherwise I had bought more kinds of fish, the plan was to make some futo and tekka maki, the nigiri and sashimi were byproducts from leftovers. For me, doing the nigiri was more fun (and less work) than the maki (rolls).

Comments or questions are most welcome.

Hmm, can't believe it's your first attempt. Everything must have cost you dear... What's in the futomaki? Fried egg, fake crab meat, cucumber, and ...

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Hmm, can't believe it's your first attempt.  Everything must have cost you dear...  What's in the futomaki?  Fried egg, fake crab meat, cucumber, and ...

-omelet: lightly fried, folded, layer for layer in a squared mini-pan

-shiitake mushrooms: cooked in sake, soy sauce and sugar

-takuwan (pickled radish, the yellow bits)

-fake crab meat sticks

-cucumber

Christian Z. aka ChryZ

[ 1337 3475 - LEET EATS ] Blog

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^ Results from my experiment:

- Sushi rice does not keep too well in the fridge even under wraps. I had to sprinkle some additional sushi vinegar onto the rice and microwave it to get it back to a workable state. The flavour was ok though.

- I bought some sushi grade fish and asked the sushi chef at the store to show me how to slice it. Damn, hiscarbon steel long blades are sharp! Now I know how to slive fish for nigiri yay!

- We made some sushi and it was quite good. I think less sugar, more salt and a bit more vinegar next time! I will post pics once my camera feels like letting me copy them off it :biggrin:

"There are two things every chef needs in the kitchen: fish sauce and duck fat" - Tony Minichiello

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Let's talk gear. I use japanese kitchen knifes for years, got a waterstone and sharpen them myself. For the sushi adventure I bought a nice sashimi knife with a v-shaped edge. The sashimi knife is brilliant for delicate works.

You must be quite a cook!

I have a sashimi knife, handed down from my mother, but it's rusted and it's no good any more. I use a general-purpose knife to cut sashimi. You don't necessarily need a sashimi knife; all you need is a sharp knife, and you only need to cut it gently while moving the knife toward you.

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  • 3 weeks later...

I have made sushi at home in the past, but haven't done so in a while. Thinking about starting again. At the time, I used whatever ingredients were probably available, without regards to quality. I'm looking for some specific brand/product information, if people have their favorites. Not talking about the fish- I know there are other threads here about that; likewise, rice cookers. I do have access to the Asian/Japanese markets in the greater NY/NJ metropolitan area to choose from. Sometimes, however, if I'm in a place like Mitsuwa, for example, the number of choices can actually be confusing and overwhelming. I'm looking for brand recommendations for such things as: sushi rice, rice vinegar, mirin, nori, shoyu, ponzu, sake for food prep (not drinking) and anything else anyone might think of (barbecue sauce for unagi, for example). Thanks for any help.

Mark A. Bauman

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I'm looking for brand recommendations for such things as: sushi rice, rice vinegar, mirin, nori, shoyu, ponzu, sake for food prep (not drinking) and anything else anyone might think of (barbecue sauce for unagi, for example). Thanks for any help.

There are quite a few threads already on many of these of these products.

rice cookers

Japanese rice

mirin

soy sauce

ponzu

On some of the othe products:

vinegar

Mitsukan is by far the most popular and in most cases the only one you will find outside of Japan. Avoid using the ones labeled sushi vinegar as these contain salt and sugar and it is much better to add them to taste separately.

nori

I have no idea of brands as I never pay attention... I usually buy a mid range product, I have been disappointed with some of the really cheap ones. Avoid Korean nori as it is usually seasoned.

sake

You should one cook with one you would be comfortable drinking, avoid the cooking sakes.

sauces

Most unagi is sold seasoned so this shouldn't really be a problem. I think I have only ever seen one kind of unagi no tare (sauce) in the stores anyway. Most prepared sauces aren't very good and it is always better to try and make your own.

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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  • 4 months later...

OK, so my husband has been after me for months to learn something about sushi and try making it. I've read all the sushi threads I can find here and in the Japan forum, and studied some of the other Web sites out there. We eat sushi in restaurants more than any other type of food, and I know we would save a lot of money and be able to get exactly what we want if I could just learn to do this at home. But I need your help, and I'm not finding all the answers I need in these threads. My questions are very American-focused, but I do have access to some good Asian markets.

1. How far in advance can I make the rice? How warm/cool should it be when I start working with it?

2. My sweetie almost always chooses spicy rolls. What do you use as a sauce for the "spicy"?

3. How long does pre-made pickled ginger keep? I'm not ready to tackle making my own on top of everything else right now.

4. Exactly what equipment do I need? I know about bamboo mats for rolling maki, I want to buy a rice cooker anyway, I already have a paddle and a large, wide non-metal bowl for the rice. Anything else?

5. How do you make those crunchy tempura-like droplets you find in some American maki?

6. What's a good brand of crab stick available in the US? How about nori?

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I can only answer some of your questions:

1. How far in advance can I make the rice? How warm/cool should it be when I start working with it?

From a previous post of mine:

Mix the vinegar, sugar, and salt in a bowl beforehand. When the rice is cooked, transfer it to another container (wooden, preferably) and add the mixture while the rice is still hot (within 10 minutes after it's cooked). Mix well by using a shamoji (rice paddle) in a cutting motion for about 45 seconds. At this stage, never use a fan. Then, use a fan for 1 minute to cool the shari and prevent it from becoming soggy. Let it cool for 20 minutes.

Additional notes:

The rice must be hot to soak in the vinegar.

Once mixed with the vinegar, the rice must be cooled to "hitohada" (human skin temperature), which should be around 100 F.

3. How long does pre-made pickled ginger keep? I'm not ready to tackle making my own on top of everything else right now.

I'm not sure, but I'd say "months."

4. Exactly what equipment do I need? I know about bamboo mats for rolling maki, I want to buy a rice cooker anyway, I already have a paddle and a large, wide non-metal bowl for the rice. Anything else?

I can't think of any other special utensil.

5. How do you make those crunchy tempura-like droplets you find in some American maki?

They are called ten-kasu (mainly in Western Japan) and age-dama (mainly in Eastern Japan). We don't use them with sushi in Japan.

Just put droplets of normal tempura batter in a pot with hot oil (approx. 180 C), using a ladle with holes or a pair of chopsticks.

Edited to add this photo:

gallery_16375_5_11125.jpg

You may be able to find bags of ten-kasu, like the one shown on the right, if you are lucky.

Edited by Hiroyuki (log)
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Malawry, for the spicy sauce, I use Kewpie mayo mixed with sriracha and a little bit of toasted sesame oil. It tastes right to me; let me know what you think.

I haven't made sushi at home in a long time. I never did quite get the flavor of the rice where I wanted it. I think I'll have to try again soon; I love taco rice and I guarantee you I can't buy taco maki around here, and I believe that's got to go into my lunchbox sometime SOON. :wub:

Jennie

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Does anyone know of some good internet sites for the purchase of sashimi-grade fish? Not always convenient to get down to NYC/NJ and I'm not so sure of the local fish purveyors in upstate NY. Did a quick internet search without good results. Thanks.

Mark A. Bauman

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Does anyone know of some good internet sites for the purchase of sashimi-grade fish? Not always convenient to get down to NYC/NJ and I'm not so sure of the local fish purveyors in upstate NY. Did a quick internet search without good results. Thanks.

http://catalinaop.com/sushi.htm

www.sushifoods.com

Both places are good. Catalina Offshore Products is more fresh while Sushifoods tends to have more frozen stuff but doesn't lack in quality. They do have a LOT more variety since Cat OP is limited in selection to what's in season. For example, you can get 5 different sizes of soft shell crab at Sushifoods.com.

These are the only two places I've purchased sushi from when I can't find what I want from the stores.

Cheers,

Bob

My Photography: Bob Worthington Photography

 

My music: Coronado Big Band
 

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Just spotted this thread... missed the earlier question about keeping sushi rice overnight.

DO NOT. The warm rice is just the right growing medium for bacteria. Also, ideally, sushi rice should be freshly prepared because it tastes best that way. (I've frozen leftover sushi rice--both seasoned and unseasoned. When ready to use again, sprinkle with a few drops of water and reheat, lightly covered, in the microwave. This loses the fragrance of the original rice, however).

1. How far in advance can I make the rice? How warm/cool should it be when I start working with it?

Again, best to make the rice just before you use it. My standard recipe is to cook the rice, then let it cool about 10 minutes before adding the sushi-zu (vinegar/sugar/salt seasoning). Mix in the sushi-zu with a paddle while fanning the rice to cool it and produce a sheen. It's then ready for use immediately. It should be warmer than room temperature.

2. My sweetie almost always chooses spicy rolls. What do you use as a sauce for the "spicy"?

Sriracha sauce (Huy Fong "Rooster" brand)., or sriracha mixed with mayonnaise to taste.

3. How long does pre-made pickled ginger keep? I'm not ready to tackle making my own on top of everything else right now.

Forever. (Or it seems that way.) As long as you don't contaminate it with fingers, dirty utensils, etc., it will keep for months and months in the refrigerator.

4. Exactly what equipment do I need? I know about bamboo mats for rolling maki, I want to buy a rice cooker anyway, I already have a paddle and a large, wide non-metal bowl for the rice. Anything else?

That's about it. I have a bunch of convenient plastic molds for making nigiri and fancy shaped rice. I bought them in a Japanese-owned 99 cent store; the same type of things are available online at about 8X the price! But they're not really necessary.

5. How do you make those crunchy tempura-like droplets you find in some American maki?

I'm not sure as I've never seen those! Maybe the sushi we get in Hawaii is less "Americanized." I would imagine they're made from drops of tempura batter that are deep-fried (or left over from making tempura).

6. What's a good brand of crab stick available in the US? How about nori?

I never use crab sticks, so I don't know. Whatever is available in your area. Louis Kemp? Most of the ones sold in Hawaii are local brands.

Try different brands of nori to find the ones you like and are easiest to handle. Even here the same brands are not always available on a day-to-day basis, so I often switch brands. I don't remember names, anyway; I recognize the packages! The half-sheets are easier to work with than the full sheets. Also, if you get "toasted" nori, you don't need to toast it over an open flame before using it.

Have fun!

SuzySushi

"She sells shiso by the seashore."

My eGullet Foodblog: A Tropical Christmas in the Suburbs

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  • 2 weeks later...

At my house we never called it chirashi sushi; we called it sushi bowl. I lived in Japan years ago and know how to make proper sushi rolls, but sometimes when we want a quick meal we'll just toss the rice with sushi vinegar, let it cool, place it in bowls, and put whatever seafood we can find on top along with some nori (cut up) and pickled ginger. Not fancy, but the kids love it.

Paul B

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  • 2 months later...

Well it may be hard to recall but perhaps here someone will know the procedure

It was this guy who came on one of Iron chef challenges with a deep fried sushi roll

Now as far as i can recall it was a long and very flay fillet of fish skin on the chef turn it up and the started making small repetitive cuts along the fillet almost to the skin but not cutting it. The he took a ball of rice spreaded and filled the middle with other seafood (can't recall what was exactly), he then made a roll and wrapped in nori sheet sealed the side and dipped in some batter then deep fried it

The final roll looked delicious

Pity I cannot recall the whole process nor the particular episode this was on

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in Boston theres a great lobster tempura at FuGakYu.

its very similar to what you described. first they essentially make a roll of only lobster and peashoots. then they tempura fry that role. than they rap that in rice and another sheet of nori, then they fry that role.

ITS SOOOOO GOOD.

www.wacatering.netfirms.com

talk does not cook rice

-chinese proverb

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it was a long and very flay fillet of fish skin on the chef turn it up and the started making small repetitive cuts along the fillet almost to the skin but not cutting it.

I can't recall that particular episode, but the process you described is hone-kiri (bone cutting). This process is usually done to the fish called hamo, which has numerous small bones in its flesh. At least 15 cuts (and up to 26 cut!) are made in every 1 sun (about 3 cm) width. There is a special knife used for this purpose, called hamokiri:

http://www.rakuten.co.jp/houcho/606650/605796/

Don't expect all Japanese-cuisine chefs can do this type of cutting because it requires a lot of training.

Hamo is basically eaten in Kansai (western part of Japan), especially in Kyoto.

Forgot to include this link:

http://www.fujimuraya.com/shopping/fish/hamo/hamo.html

Sorry, Japanese only. This page explains how to prepare hamo, including hone-kiri (骨切り in Japanese).

Edited by Hiroyuki (log)
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  • 9 months later...

Good Evening!

I was in the middle of making dinner tonight and then something came up which meant I had to abort dinner. However, I have a problem.

Dinner tonight was suppose to include Tuna and Salmon. I had thawed out both fish about two hours ago. Can I leave the fish in the fridge and eat it tomorrow raw? Or is it probably not safe to do so?

Thanks for your advice in advance! :smile:

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I sometimes do that. I can also put the fish in a container and add some soy sauce (or equal amounts of soy sauce and mirin) to make "zuke". I tried to find my posts about zuke, but I couldn't. :sad:

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Thank you Hiroyuki for your fast response!

However, sadly, I don't have any mirin or sake in my pantry right now. :sad:

Can I wrap it in plastic wrap and save it for tomorrow's dinner? or can I pan sear it on the outside (inside still raw) and store it in the fridge that way for the next day?

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Thank you Hiroyuki for your fast response!

However, sadly, I don't have any mirin or sake in my pantry right now.  :sad:

Can I wrap it in plastic wrap and save it for tomorrow's dinner? or can I pan sear it on the outside (inside still raw) and store it in the fridge that way for the next day?

Don't worry, you don't need mirin or sake to make "zuke". Soy sauce is the only essential ingredient for making "zuke".

I would wrap it in plastic wrap or simply put it in a tupperware container. I don't want to sear it because then it's not sashimi any longer!

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