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Frozen white peach purée


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Nothing, if the white peaches are good ones. But that's a bit unlikely now, no?

Oh, and Harry's Bar doesn't want you to mechnically purée them, which is a pain, but is very happy for you to use the French stuff.

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Oh, and Harry's Bar doesn't want you to mechnically purée them, which is a pain, but is very happy for you to use the French stuff.

Sounds all a bit bollocksy to me. But it gives me an idea: maybe, later in the season, a comparative bellini tasting session should be held using:

a fresh yellow peaches pureed by hand

b fresh yellow peaches pureed by machine

c fresh white peaches pureed by hand

d fresh white peaches pureed by machine

e frozen white peach puree

f any other suggested permutation

Anyway, a ripe peach is pretty easy to puree by hand, literally.

v

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V -- sounds good to me.

FWIW, here's Arrigo:

We had a man who did nothing all day but cut up and pit small white peaches and squeeze them with his hands to extract the juide. The juice and pulp were then forced through a chinois ... to form the rose-coloured elixir that is mixed with Prosecco to make Bellinis ... Now we are lucky -- we can get excellent frozen white peach puree from France and serve Bellinis year-round.

Never use yellow peaches to make a Bellini and never puree the peaches by machine. If you can't find the frozen puree you'll just have to produce it the old-fashioned way. Use a food mill or meat grinder to make the pulp and then force it through a fine sieve. If the peach puree is very tart, sweeten it with just a little sugar syrup. Refrigerate the puree until it is very cold. Mix it with very cold, dry Prosecco in the proportion of 1 part peach puree to 3 parts wine ...

Edited by Kikujiro (log)
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Oh, and Harry's Bar doesn't want you to mechnically purée them, which is a pain, but is very happy for you to use the French stuff.

Sounds all a bit bollocksy to me. But it gives me an idea: maybe, later in the season, a comparative bellini tasting session should be held using:

a fresh yellow peaches pureed by hand

b fresh yellow peaches pureed by machine

c fresh white peaches pureed by hand

d fresh white peaches pureed by machine

e frozen white peach puree

f any other suggested permutation

Anyway, a ripe peach is pretty easy to puree by hand, literally.

v

g blood peach, which is a strain of white peach

h white necterine (which are also peachs)

i yellow necterine (again, a peach)

Although I think that yellow peachs are inferior for Bellini making.

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Still having trouble finding a source?

Try these companies: Jalley, and Mash. They are fruit and veg distributors for restaurants in London. I've seen the white peach puree as well as many other, very good purees. You may not be able to buy from them but maybe they can help you.

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Maybe we should retire to Edinburgh for the bellini tasting. (Followed by a malt whisky tasting on the next day). I bet V&C gets good peaches in. I suspect that nectarines wouldn't come out so well in the tasting, though it would be worth trying them out. I love nectarines, but the perfume is not so delicate.

v

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Smoking Bear, thanks. I spoke to Jalley, who are trade only but helpfully put me in touch with their suppliers, Regal foods in NW10. They import a French purée which as far as I can make out isn't Boiron but called something like Le Fruitier (?). They'll happily sell it if I go over there. £2.95/kilo. Now, should I pursue this or do we have a reason to suspect it's going to be inferior to Boiron?

Edited by Kikujiro (log)
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Maybe we should retire to Edinburgh for the bellini tasting.  (Followed by a malt whisky tasting on the next day). I bet V&C gets good peaches in.  I suspect that nectarines wouldn't come out so well in the tasting, though it would be worth trying them out.  I love nectarines, but the perfume is not so delicate.

v

Sure, sure, you doggy-bag a suckling pig and I will arrange the rest. :smile:

Using V&C white peaches would make the make for very expensive Bellini. Also the peachs are a bit rubbish. White peachs are too delicate to transport well, so they are picked before they have ripened enough.

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This is all very exciting. I could go to town and pick up some frozen chicken stock from Regale too, instead of making it (which I was going to do in the time I'll now be spending travelling to Harlesden). Bad idea?

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