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Pork and cabbage


mamster
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I made a most remarkable recipe last night. It's originally from Jane Grigson, but I found it in Tamasin Day-Lewis's Well-Tempered Food. I can give you the whole recipe in a couple of sentences:

Get a 3-4 pound Savoy cabbage and core and slice it. Blanch the cabbage five minutes, drain, shock in cold water, and squeeze out most of the water. Layer the cabbage with 1.5 lb lightly seasoned pork sausage (I used "English banger" sausages from Whole Foods)--three layers of cabbage separated by two layers of sausage. Season with salt and pepper and dot the top with butter. Bake, covered, at 300 F for 2.5 hours.

It comes out rich, juicy, hot, melting, almost unbelievably good. Give it a try, quick, before winter is over.

Matthew Amster-Burton, aka "mamster"

Author, Hungry Monkey, coming in May

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A long time Moore winter staple with this variation. Three layers. The third is sliced, just boiled potatoes. Cabbage, sausage potato, salt and lots or ground pepper. Repeat. And repeat again. I use a big caserole dish. Leftovers are even better than first time out of the oven.

Holly Moore

"I eat, therefore I am."

HollyEats.Com

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I just had a huge slab of leftovers for lunch and can vouch for the last part of your statement. The potatoes will go in next time. The sausage I used, I noticed, had a hint of nutmeg, something worth sprinkling between the layers if your sausage lacks it.

Matthew Amster-Burton, aka "mamster"

Author, Hungry Monkey, coming in May

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I did something similar a couple weeks ago, though I used napa cabage (un cooked) and thinly sliced pork belly.

I layered the two alternately adding garlic, salt and pepper and bay leaves. I drizzled with a little EVOO and baked for one hour (30 minutes covered, 30 minutes not).

Absolutely wonderful!

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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I made a most remarkable recipe last night.  It's originally from Jane Grigson, but I found it in Tamasin Day-Lewis's Well-Tempered Food.  I can give you the whole recipe in a couple of sentences:

Get a 3-4 pound Savoy cabbage and core and slice it.  Blanch the cabbage five minutes, drain, shock in cold water, and squeeze out most of the water.  Layer the cabbage with 1.5 lb lightly seasoned pork sausage (I used "English banger" sausages from Whole Foods)--three layers of cabbage separated by two layers of sausage.  Season with salt and pepper and dot the top with butter.  Bake, covered, at 300 F for 2.5 hours.

It comes out rich, juicy, hot, melting, almost unbelievably good.  Give it a try, quick, before winter is over.

This sounds wonderful. Do you use uncooked sausage, or the smoked sort? If uncooked, is it in the casing, or removed?

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It's uncooked, unsmoked sausage--Whole Foods makes their bangers with pork, breadcrumbs (not too many), and spices. I discarded the casing and pressed the sausage meat flat between my hands so it made a thin, solid layer between the layers of cabbage. You can see the strata when you dish a piece up.

Matthew Amster-Burton, aka "mamster"

Author, Hungry Monkey, coming in May

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Bacon and cabbage also seem made for each other. I will cook some cubes of bacon, add coarsely chopped cabbage (and maybe an onion...and I like to use plain green cabbage because I'm so cheap), let it cook long enough to wilt, then stir in a healthy dollop of creme fraiche and finish it in the oven.

I made this other night without the bacon but added some chopped chestnuts (from my post-xmas wm-sonoma score at $2/jar)...mmmmm

Jim

olive oil + salt

Real Good Food

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Tabletop grill, set to medium low:

Pork belly or slab bacon, boiled ten minutes, simmered in sake or beer for an hour, sliced. Place slices on grill.

Cabbage (Napa, green, purple) blanched, squeezed, tossed lightly with garlic oil. Place quantities on grill along with scallions.

Have ready rice (I use a mixture of gohan and short grain brown) with gomasio.

Start with kimchee soup (old kimchee near bottom of the jar with dashi).

Pick up pork slices, dip in soup, eat. Rice. Cabbage. More pork.

Some mushrooms are nice too.

"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

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  • 2 weeks later...

Since we had a few extra days of winter here in NYC, I decided to give this a try tonight. I used Savoy cabbage, sliced just boiled potatoes, and Whole Foods' Irish Bangers. The resulting dish was quite delicious, but absolutely swimming in liquid (water and fat, I assume). I did squeeze as much water as I could out of the cabbage before layering it. Has anyone else had this experience?

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  • 2 years later...

I do mine by cooking bacon and onion till the onion is soft. Then I add chunks of Kielbasa and potato, top with lots of coarsely shredded cabbage and a good sprinkle of Caraway seeds. Cover with a lid and let simmer until cabbage and potatoes are soft.

We like a grainy mustard with it.

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There is a similar recipe in Madeleine Kamman's book "The Making of a Cook". Various pork products are baked smothered in onions and saurerkraut with bay leaves, juniper berries and caraway. It's a favorite at my house.

April

One cantaloupe is ripe and lush/Another's green, another's mush/I'd buy a lot more cantaloupe/ If I possessed a fluoroscope. Ogden Nash

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i decided to follow Grigson/Tamasin/mamster recipe for sausage stuffed cabbage and it was great - used the suggested irish bagers from WholeFoods - also bought a head of organic cabbage there: initially disappointed by the absense of savoy, i was actually rewarded - don't know if this is because the cabbage was organic or because it was so fresh or for whatever other reason this was the best tasting cabbage we had in a very long time.

Another difference of this dish from above mentioned cabbage/sausage combos is that it cooks into perfect moist cake and i didn't even had a need to pour out any liquid - the deeply flavored broth served as a sauce.

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