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Three wines


Florida Jim
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Recent tastes:

1996 R&V Dauvissat, Le Forets Chablis:

lemon oil, white fruit, steel, rain water and a touch of earth on the nose/

medium bodied, bright acids, flavors follow the nose, very intense, a bit angular but some nice complexity and evident depth, balanced/

long, crisp finish.

Way too early. Still, it was refreshing, mouth-watering and went with Manchego cheese and crackers.

(Aside: some wines you drink young and you can sense that you have missed something by not waiting; some its not as easy to tell. This was one when it was easy – we missed something.)

2000 Alain Michaud, Brouilly Cuvee Prestige:

powerful dark fruit and spice nose, nothing light or airy here/

medium body, dense black fruit and spice flavors with depth and concentration, some structure beginning to show but this opens with some airing, intense and balanced/

long, black fruit finish.

Beginning to close up but not completely yet. The Bonnes Mares of Beaujolais; powerful, almost brooding wine.

Delicious with grilled chicken and a zucchini and feta salad.

1999 Verset, Cornas:

From the same lot/case as several other bottles I have had (so I do not suspect bottle variation), this one was nowhere near as fruit filled and meaty as those. Rather it had a “smoldering stems” scent and taste, much as Scotch as that smoldering peat element. Angry stuff and, if it were not for the other bottles I have tasted, I would think it bad – rather, it seems to be going to sleep and does not like to be annoyed.

Had with crusty olive bread and butter.

Hold.

(Day 2 – That stemminess has morphed into olive and bar-b-q; much more attractive and the fruit is more open and generous. Definitely, this wine should be allowed to sleep; your reward will be a great bottle of Cornas.)

Best, Jim

www.CowanCellars.com

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Nice notes, Jim. I've got some 1998 Michaud Cuvee Prestige in the cellar that I decided to just forget about for a while to see what might happen. I've had a few eye-opening experiences with older Beaujolais, and this one seemed like it might have enough stuffing to make things interesting.

How far would you push it? At this point I'm inclined to let it go through 2006/8.

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How far would you push it?  At this point I'm inclined to let it go through 2006/8.

Robin,

No pro am I at aging Beaujolais, but I see no reason not to let it sit as you are so inclined.

BTW, if you see the 99 Prestige about, I suspect it will go even longer - a very serious wine.

Best, Jim

www.CowanCellars.com

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what the heck is a white fruit?

Jason,

White peach is the first thing that comes to mind by I also include white grapes, pears, apples and other white fleshed fruit in the term. When I use it, I am trying to describe a melange of these scents or flavors. And it is used as opposed to red fruits or black fruits.

Of course, if a wine has a predominant smell of one, say apple, then I would use that as the descriptor. But when one or the other does not predominate, then I use the "white fruit" catch-all.

Best, Jim

www.CowanCellars.com

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