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Mass produced lagers


rstarobi
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A pilsner is a type of lager. Lager refers to the type of yeast and the fermentation temperature.

Another great lager is Negro Modelo, a Vienese lager from Mexico. Dos Equis Oscura and Indio (don't think they have this in the US) are other good examples of this style.

Here's a link to all the different types of lagers. It's a very cool site.

It reminded me of another lager I like, Spaten Optimator (It's a Doppelbock). In general I like bock beers but know very little about them.

Edited by guajolote (log)
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Thanks for the info and link. Spaten Optimator is one of my husband's favorites! A local German restaurant has several types of Spaten on tap and in the spring when they get in the Maybock it's cause for celebration.

I like the sharpness of Pilsner Urquell, Czechvar and Budvar.

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Huh, had no idea that pilsners were just light lagers.

I used to think that I hated pilsners and preferred lagers but now I see that I had no idea what I was talking about. :wacko::laugh:

Edited by Joy (log)
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Kronenberg, Lowenbrau, Carlsberg Export, Stella Artois (a fine, crisp beer), Red Stripe (full flavored), Grolsch.  Not Bud, thank you.

Wilfred Dearest,

Have you ever tried a Bud? Because in my experience, objective realities have proven repeatedly and beyond the slightest glimmer of doubt that while the first sip or two of a Red Stripe may indeed seem to boast some flavor, by the fourth sip that illusion is no longer operational. One is left with a warming, squat, often flat brown bottle whose sole redeeming attribute is the sunset on the beach one might have once enjoyed or may still hope to enjoy in Jamaica. Bud, au contraire, never pretends to have any flavor in the first place. Its unassuming, fizzly nature, sexy long neck and pragmatic, utilitarian style rather lend it an almost unearthly grace, first sip to the last. :rolleyes: Should you wish to compare and contrast, blindly and first hand, I would happily invite you, at the drinking establishment of your choice, so that you may make a more objective and better determination about their relative merit.

But as to the question of whether any are worth drinking, I'd have to say no. Go with Krug...

Edited by lissome (log)

Drinking when we are not thirsty and making love at all seasons: That is all there is to distinguish us from the other Animals.

-Beaumarchais

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...Red Stripe (full flavored), Grolsch.  Not Bud, thank you.

To me, Red Stripe is possibly the most overrated beer there is. The only time it has ever been palatable to me is when I was also partaking of Jamaica's other major export....

Since we're reaching far afield for favorite "mass-produced" lagers, I love Bohemia from Mexico.

Most women don't seem to know how much flour to use so it gets so thick you have to chop it off the plate with a knife and it tastes like wallpaper paste....Just why cream sauce is bitched up so often is an all-time mytery to me, because it's so easy to make and can be used as the basis for such a variety of really delicious food.

- Victor Bergeron, Trader Vic's Book of Food & Drink, 1946

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I love Pilsner Urquell; it's one of my favorite beers out of hundreds sampled. But I'm surprised no one mentioned Harp Lager. Formerly brewed in Ireland; now the Harp that you get here is brewed in Canada. Still good, though. Considered more of an International Lager in style than a pilsner. Harp, along with Grolsch from Holland, are the best examples of this style. Better than Heineken, Becks, Molson, and other mass produced imports.

John the hot dog guy

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I love Pilsner Urquell; it's one of my favorite beers out of hundreds sampled. But I'm surprised no one mentioned Harp Lager. Formerly brewed in Ireland; now the Harp that you get here is brewed in Canada. Still good, though. Considered more of an International Lager in style than a pilsner. Harp, along with Grolsch from Holland, are the best examples of this style. Better than Heineken, Becks, Molson, and other mass produced imports.

Is that what happened to Harp? When did they do that? I used to love it but find in boring now.

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although sierra nev, nor anchor steam are not, supposedly, mass-produced, they are; however, available throughout the country; therefore, it would appear that either 1 could/should be at the top of many "readily available beer lists".

personally prefer sierra nev due to it stronger hoppiness & tastes + i believe sierra's sole concentration is on biere production vs anchor steam's larger product line: beer, gin & possibly other specialty items i am unaware of.

if anyone knows if sierra nev produces products, non-beer, i would like to know.

Edited by baruch (log)
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I was under the impression that Anchor Steam, by definition, is not a lager (bottom-fermented) at all, but sort of a "middle-fermented" beer. I think the story is that the first batch was made in a bathtub. And I was not aware that Sierra Nevada even made a lager, but then, I haven't really been looking for one. For semi-mass produced, I'd vote for Brooklyn Lager, or even the fabulous Brooklyn Pilsner, but you can't really get it outside of NYC. Of course, you can't really get Yuengling outside of PA either.

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cheap champagne is as bad as cheap beer.

i remember the first time i had frexienet. thankfully, i've managed to avoid it since.

Yuengling is a big local lager. some people prefer it to others. i think it is definitely the best cheap beer around. Eminently quaffable.

around right now is PA, where they're as readily available as Bud and Miller and Coors.

They're in Jersey, and NY, I believe, and they've bought some breweries and expanded capacity.

Does Rheingold make a lager? I've been hearing about their re-emergence in NYC lately?

Herb aka "herbacidal"

Tom is not my friend.

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cheap champagne is as bad as cheap beer.

i remember the first time i had frexienet.  thankfully, i've managed to avoid it since.

.....

Being inexpensive, doesn't necessarily make something bad. That said..... I like Freixenet. I'm thinking about changing my handle to "cheapbear."

-- Jeff

"I don't care to belong to a club that accepts people like me as members." -- Groucho Marx

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cheap champagne is as bad as cheap beer.

herbacidal,

do you mean inexpensive sparklers from Champagne, or rather all inexpensive sparkling wines. i can say that some proseccos, coming in at 8 or 9 dollars, are very satisfying, and certainly good enough to serve to even the most discerning guests.

"red white and blue" brand beer, however, is best left to my grandfather.

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cheap champagne is as bad as cheap beer.

i remember the first time i had frexienet.  thankfully, i've managed to avoid it since.

Pedant alert -- Freixenet is a cava (Spanish sparkling wine). Champagne is always French.

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Yeungling Lager.

Agreed, but only as a last resort. I've had mineral water in Italy that has more flavor than mass produced lager (and I really don't think that Yeungling qualifies there). Give me a cask conditioned lager any day of the week.

BTW -- I think calling beers like Bud or Stella "wonderfully crisp" is the equivalent of calling jug wine "food friendly." :wink:

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For a mass produced canned lager, I quite like Coors Extra Gold.

Here are some less easily found favorites:

Dock Street Amber (my favorite)

Yuengling Traditional Lager (quite nice for the price)

Victory Dark Lager

Victory All Malt Lager

Shiner Bock

Yuengling Lord Chesterfield Ale (it's actually a lager)

Saranac Chocolate Amber Lager

Victory Prima Pils

there's a very nice schwarzbier from the Midwest, think it's Sprecher Black

Saranac Black Forrest

Anchor Steam

Dixie Blackenend Voodoo (but not regular Dixie)

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I'm surprised no one mentioned Harp Lager. Formerly brewed in Ireland; now the Harp that you get here is brewed in Canada.

I don't mean to question your statement, but I was drinking a Harp last night, and the label clearly states: Imported lager, brewed in Dundalk Ireland. It would seem strange to me that one could purchase Irish Harp here in Montreal, while only Canadian brewed Harp was available in the U.S.. I do know that bottled Guinness sold in Quebec is brewed by Labatt's (gives new meaning to the word nasty), and cans and kegs are the imported stuff, but I'm pretty sure there is no locally brewed Harp being sold here. Could it be possible you were misinformed about Canadian brewed Harp? Or could it be that this is no longer the case?

Just wondering.

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  • 3 months later...

jonp: Are you kidding with that post? I wouldn't drink Heineken for the same reason I avoid Budweiser. What's the point of either?

As an arrogant Belgian, I will say this: The Dutch don't know squat about making beer. I don't even know why they bother. Belgium is right nextdoor. They should concentrate on other things and leave Belgians to brewing. As an example: A few years ago Heineken decided it was time to take over the Belgian market. They tried for a while to get started but there was ZERO interest . Eventually they gave up, realizing that no self-respecting Belgian would ever order a Heineken at a bar, or be seen walking out of store with a case.

I wish that instead of Stella being imported so widely that Jupiler and Palm would be available. Both are producted in large enough quantities. I guess Interbrew has a stranglehold on that business.

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  • 1 month later...
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