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Yakitori


torakris
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The ultimate yakitori

http://www.imaiya.co.jp/english/menu/dainty.html

chicken brain sashimi............. :blink:

while you are at the site check out the rest of the menu as well,

I've got to get to this place :biggrin:

Hmmm...chicken brain sashimi??? Can we invite uncle Sam Manella for dinner?

:raz:

chicken brain sashimi with 4 different sauce, this was very nice..

i8424.jpg

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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Does Ton-Toro come from the loin section?  It looks wonderfully marbled....the sure sign of flavor!

This is from a post I wrote a while ago about tontoro:

Actually it is not from the belly, rather the jowls and is quite pricey because only 300 grams can be taken per head.

For anyone who doesn't know what this is take a look at this website, it is in Japanese but has great pictures, I am drooling already!

http://www.e-2929.com/syouhin/tontoro/tontoro.html

When I was looking for some info for it in English just now though, I ran across it being translated as both fatty loin and fatty rib, hhhmmm.....

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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  • 10 months later...

I need some good inspritions for the dipping, skewer combination, and other good stuff you make on the grill....

Some of my own favorites are Shiso maki (but i have seen so many varitions of it and some not that good.), king prawn with yusu, chicken heart...

Best regards,

Gilbert

Food blog - www.floss.dk

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  • 1 month later...

I was just posting links...

From this webpage, besides ponjiri, chicken butt is called in various ways, :

ぼんじり、ぼんぼち、さんかく、ごんぼ、テール

Bonjiri, bonbochi, sankaku, gonbo, tail (in English)

You can see some photos here.

I've never had it! :sad:

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Goma tsukune, or so it's called at one of my favourite local yakitori/robata restaurants: ground chicken moulded around a skewer and topped with black sesame seeds. Also sliced asparagus wrapped with thinly sliced pork. Same pork wrapped around garlic chives. Heaven.

Joie Alvaro Kent

"I like rice. Rice is great if you're hungry and want 2,000 of something." ~ Mitch Hedberg

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  • 1 month later...

Hi Folks!

I was hoping some of the resident experts on Japanese food could provide some advice...

Here is what I have planned for dinner tonight, it was just something I thought of today and so I have typed it out in the form of a recipe:

Chicken Liver Yakitori:

Chicken livers, cleaned and trimmed

Spring/green onions

Glaze/Sauce:

1/2 cup Shoyu (Soy Sauce)

1/2 cup Mirin

1/2 cup Sake

1/4 cup Sugar

1.) Alternate chicken livers and pieces of spring/green onion on skewers.

2.) Simmer Glaze/Sauce until reduced and syrupy.

3.) Brush chicken/onion skewers with oil, Grill livers until nicely browned on both sides

4.) Brush on glaze and cook until heavily glazed.

5.) Serve with sushi rice (sushi rice made as usual - i.e. with sugar, salt and rice vinegar added after cooking).

6.) Sprinkle on chopped Spring/green onions.

OK, so that is the plan... but I have some questions:

1.) Does this sound reasonable? Would livers work with a sweet glaze like this? Usually in western/European cooking they are served with creamy sauces. I know that this recipe works with chicken thighs and breasts, I have made it many times and it is beautiful.

2.) Should I soak the livers in any way? (once again, in western/European cooking they are often soaked in milk or brandy or some form of alcohol)

3.) Should the livers be cooked through or still pink? (I know in European recipes livers are usually cooked until rare - pink in the middle, not sure about in Japanese cooking)

4.) Any suggested improvements?

5.) What other cuts of chicken would work well using this "recipe"/method? (besides the obvious chicken breast and chicken thighs)

Thanks!

Edited by infernooo (log)
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Liver is one of my favorite types of yakitori.

As to the prep, I have never soaked the livers in milk for use in Japanese dishes though I do it for some western style dishes.

I also prefer liver a touch on the rare side but I would only do this if I was sure of the quality.

The only thing I would do differently is serve it with plain white rice.

In Japan there is no part of the chicken that isn't used in yakitori. A favorite of mine are the gizzards, I just trim them and usually separate the lobes (what do you call those?), grill the same as for the livers.

You can also grill just the skin though I find this is better with out the soy based sauce, rather just sprinkle it with salt.

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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this is the menu from my favorite yakitori place. there are many "other" parts on it. I tried translating it but there were a lot of items that I couldn't figure out. Any experts in chicken part translation?

gallery_23727_2765_3008.jpg

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Here is a similar question (in Japanese).

Among several answers,

通常は塩をふり、15分ほどした後流水で洗ってやるだけで十分なんですが、レバーがちょっと苦手な人がいる場合は塩をして15分した物を水で洗って牛乳に半日付けてやると癖が無くなります。

Usually, sprinkle salt, let it sit for 15 min. or so, and rinse with water.

For those who don't like liver, sprinkle salt, let it sit for 15 min., rinse with water, and soak in milk for half a day.

Don't worry about the seasoning. In general, there can be only two types of flavor for yakitori anyway: Tare (sauce) and shio (salt).

Let me add one more thing: For native Japanese like me, yakitori is something to eat with alcohol (especially beer!!), not with rice, let alone vinegared rice.

John, I will post a translation of some of the items on the menu later (probably tomorrow).

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this is the menu from my favorite yakitori place. there are many "other" parts on it. I tried translating it but  there were a lot of items that I couldn't figure out. Any experts in chicken part translation?

gallery_23727_2765_3008.jpg

With some difficulty, I finally made this list:

合鴨 aigamo: Type of duck

やき鳥 yakitori (also spelled 焼き鳥, 焼鳥, やきとり, and so on): Grilled chicken

かわ kawa: Skin

ずり zuri: Gizzard (also called 砂肝 sunagimo)

かんむり kanmuri: Crown

せせり seseri: Meat around the neck

みち michi (lit. path, road): Oviduct? (I'm not sure.)

すきみ sukimi: Meat around the neck

きも kimo: Liver (also called レバー ray-bah from English)

ハート hato (from English heart): Heart (better known as ハツ hatsu, which is also from English)

目ぎも megimo: Eye liver?? (what is it??)

くび kubi: Neck

I'm not sure how seseri, sukimi, and kubi differ from one another.

さんかく sankaku (lit. triangle): Tail

なんこつ nankotsu: Cartilage

ささみ sasami: Fillet

きんかん kinkan (lit. kumquat): Egg still in the hen

like these

http://store.yahoo.co.jp/suigodori/420152.html

手羽 teba: Wing

せぎも segimo: Kidney

巾着 kinchaku: I can't tell what it is.

ころ koro: I can't tell what it is, either.

つくね tsukune: Minced chicken, with other ingredients added

It took me more than one hour to make this incomplete list. Don't think that this type of translation is easy to do just because I am a native Japanese! Now, who's gonna pay me for that...

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I've always wondered, how is cartilage Yakitori made? Where to you get it from? How do you bind it?

'Cartilage' isn't bound. It's a single piece, that lies between the breasts and has a shape that's like a three-pointed star in section, and long and tapered. I'd say it's anatomically in a similar location to a duck's 'keel'.

Also, my understanding is 'aigamo' 「合鴨」 is a cross between a duck and a goose.

I don't recognise a lot of those menu names in the photo, I'm guessing because the naming in Kansai is quite dofferent compared with Tokyo.

Edited by Blether (log)

QUIET!  People are trying to pontificate.

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Thanks, Blether.

Here's what I found about chicken cartilage:

For use as yakitori, there are two types of chicken cartilage: yagen (breast cartilage) and genkotsu (knee cartilage).

The four photos here show pieces of yagen, which are easy to handle. Genkotsu is hard to handle, and often served in the kara age style.

The photo here shows both knee kartridge yakitori (left) and breast cartilage yakitori (right).

Other two photos of yagen can be found here.

This is a recipe (in Japanese) for tsukune yakitori with cartilage added (doesn't specify which type of cartilage to use).

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this is the menu from my favorite yakitori place. there are many "other" parts on it. I tried translating it but  there were a lot of items that I couldn't figure out. Any experts in chicken part translation?

gallery_23727_2765_3008.jpg

With some difficulty, I finally made this list:

合鴨 aigamo: Type of duck

やき鳥 yakitori (also spelled 焼き鳥, 焼鳥, やきとり, and so on): Grilled chicken

かわ kawa: Skin

ずり zuri: Gizzard (also called 砂肝 sunagimo)

かんむり kanmuri: Crown

せせり seseri: Meat around the neck

みち michi (lit. path, road): Oviduct? (I'm not sure.)

すきみ sukimi: Meat around the neck

きも kimo: Liver (also called レバー ray-bah from English)

ハート hato (from English heart): Heart (better known as ハツ hatsu, which is also from English)

目ぎも megimo: Eye liver?? (what is it??)

くび kubi: Neck

I'm not sure how seseri, sukimi, and kubi differ from one another.

さんかく sankaku (lit. triangle): Tail

なんこつ nankotsu: Cartilage

ささみ sasami: Fillet

きんかん kinkan (lit. kumquat): Egg still in the hen

like these

http://store.yahoo.co.jp/suigodori/420152.html

手羽 teba: Wing

せぎも segimo: Kidney

巾着 kinchaku: I can't tell what it is.

ころ koro: I can't tell what it is, either.

つくね tsukune: Minced chicken, with other ingredients added

It took me more than one hour to make this incomplete list. Don't think that this type of translation is easy to do just because I am a native Japanese! Now, who's gonna pay me for that...

Thanks so much for the translation Hiroyuki. I have eaten all the items on the menu and can clarify a little bit after asking another fan of this restaurant what some of the items are.

みち michi (lit. path, road): yes it is the Ovaduct.

目ぎも megimo: it is like liver in taste but is much lighter in color.

かんむり kanmuri: Crown, also called cock's comb (this is really tasty)

maybe I can take pictures next time. for those who are interested the restaurant is called Torikan (鳥勘) and here is a map

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Thanks, Blether.

Here's what I found about chicken cartilage:

For use as yakitori, there are two types of chicken cartilage:  yagen (breast cartilage) and genkotsu (knee cartilage).

The four photos here show pieces of yagen, which are easy to handle.  Genkotsu is hard to handle, and often served in the kara age style.

The photo here shows both knee kartridge yakitori (left) and breast cartilage yakitori (right).

Other two photos of yagen can be found here.

This is a recipe (in Japanese) for tsukune yakitori with cartilage added (doesn't specify which type of cartilage to use).

Wow, thanks hiroyuki! I guess this means that for the most part, there's no way to make this stuff at home unless i'm willing to buy mass quantities of whole chicken/breast. I'm still not sure how to get the knee cartilage that way...i guess you have to somehow take out the bones and leave the cartilage attached to the meat. Hmm.

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Hi Folks!

Well I made a liver version of yakitori and it was great! However being "guts", I was eating solo :-).

This cartilage has got me interested... how do you eat it? I assume you grill it and then eat it like you would bones that have been roasted until they are brittle and crunchy?

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