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VivreManger

Au Petit Marguery

23 posts in this topic

Do any of you have anything to add to this post that I copied from the Patricia Wells' Web-site. I had been planning to eat at Le Petit Marguery at the end of November when I will be in Paris and I would like to know how soon this departure will take place.

By the way have any of you eaten there recently? Any recommendations.

My wife and teen/pre-teen daughters are soft on vegetarianism and would probably prefer fish or foul to hearty gibier. Is there any fish on Le Petit Marguery's menu?

Thanks

"I too felt my face drop when I read, in

Patricia Wells IHT column, that the

Cousin brothers were leaving their

lively, engaging Le Petit Marguery.

I shall miss them very much, especially

Alain, who ran the front of the house with a rare combination of humor and

professionalism.

What is happening to the three brothers,

now that they are leaving ? And why

did they decide to stop?"

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1. They convinced their fourth brother to join them in Woody Herman's Second Herd.

2. They decided to hire George S. Kaufman as a script writer and work in the movies.

Has anyone heard of anything else?

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They joined Zippo and the rest of Wendy's family in never-never land.

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I ate there last week and it was very good and really excellent for the price.

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They are opening a new 5000 seat bistro in the Bois de Bologne called

Le Grand Bloblos. It will have a special section for called "faire une pipe." :biggrin:

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Au Petit Marguery, 9 bd du Port-Royal, 13th (01.43.31.58.59), Mº Gobelins. closed Sunday-Monday

For sometime I have been meaning to write up my meal at this well-known restaurant, that, if my perusal of the Paris postings is correct, has not gotten much attention on this board. We dined there in early December. This was within a month or two of its sale by the long-time owners and managers, the Cousin Brothers. Since at that time, they were, I believe, still managing it, the six month (?) transition to the new regime had yet to end. It would be useful to see what changes, if any, are now taking place. Au Petit Marguery makes appearances in most of the standard gourmet guides as a moderately-priced (3 courses around 40 euros w/o wine) and reliable venue for game.

Unfortunately -- with some irony -- the circumstances of that evening were not the best. Our Moroccan-American-Jewish hosts in Paris had served us a huge hand-rolled couscous meal that Saturday afternoon. The broth was superb, the best I have ever had. The accompanying mezze, delightful -- including a very fine fennel crudite -- and the flourless chocolate cake that finished the meal, delicate and satisfying. Under the circumstances not all of my family, daughters (11 and 14) and wife were up to the rigors of a second major meal later that day. Force majeur, the burden fell on me to do most of the eating. The kids wound up ordering salad and appetizers, sharing the main courses with us. We split one desert, but the mignardaises alone would have been enough. My wife and I shared half a bottle of wine.

Our eldest daughter had the sea-food ravioli as her starter. It was a surprisingly good combination of oriental style shrimp-based ravioli in a Mediterranean zuppe de pesce-like broth. We all gladly shared tastes of this dish, a successful fusion not expected in a traditional French game institution. My order of pheasant terrine, something I expected them to do well, was disappointing. I could have had better charcuterie from almost any corner-deli in town. And the cornichons were nowhere to be found. The pleasant French couple at the table close by ordered the assortment of terrines. I did not taste theirs but by appearance, the food did not look significantly different, i.e. better, than mine. At this point the kids moved onto their salads. True to form, this is not the course to order in a game restaurant, but they needed their rabbit food after all that couscous.

My wife ordered the Cousin Brothers' mixture of five wild mushrooms, sautéed in garlic and roasted to finish. I ordered the biche (i.e. doe). I tasted a few of my wife's mushrooms, nothing too exciting, a judgment she shared, although she had no trouble finishing the plate. I found them a bit dry and stringy. The garlic was not as assertive as I would have liked. On the other hand my biche was superb. It was one of the tastiest bits of meat I have ever eaten. I had never ordered doe before since I don't think it has appeared on any menu in the States. Perhaps restaurateurs fear that serving bambi might drive even some dedicated carnivores into the arms of PETA. In my case however, it only reinforced my carnivorous instincts. Doe, as prepared at Au Petit Marguery, is superb, even better than any venison dishes I have enjoyed. About four-five years ago I had venison at Jean-Georges' NY restaurant and this Paris dish was superior.

The doe was very simply prepared, seared to a pleasing crispness on the outside, the outer flesh, almost caramelized in sweetness. Inside the flesh had a gamy richness that everyone at the table enjoyed (I did not tell my daughters they were eating bambi -- just steak). The meat was poised on a richly buttered bit of toast and surrounded by large tear-dropped shaped purees of winter root vegetables, different turnips and potatoes. The tastes complimented each other well.

I passed on a dessert of my own, content to taste the well-made crème brulee, which our 14-year old pronounced one of the best and devoured with gusto. The mignardaises consisted of crystallized citrus peel and lovely light and tasty butter cookies, more than enough for the four of us.

We sat at the entry of the restaurant, designated for no-smokers. None of the other diners, all French, smoked either. The interior of the restaurant is lovely, perhaps more attractive, but the bright airy room where we dined suited us well.

The restaurant is definitely worth a return engagement. Their well-known lièvre à la royale is my next meal there.

I really liked the Petit Marguery, but am very sceptical on what it will be like from now on...might eat again there soon, as it's nearby my apartment...will keep you all updated

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Last November it was announced that the freres Cousin, owners of Le Petit Marguery, would be leaving it or selling it or otherwise packing it in. As recently as March 20, a poster on this board referred to "the imminent change" in ownership. I'm going to Paris in the next month and would ordinarily like to try a bistro about which I have heard so much. Does anyone actually KNOW: (1) Are the Cousins still there? (2) If so, when are they leaving, and are they suffering from lame duck disease? (3) If not, is it still open under new management? and (4) If so, is it good, as good as ever, better than ever, or other? Thanks. . ..

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are they suffering from lame duck disease?

:biggrin: We always loved the duck - anyway they made it.

I emailed a friend who owns a hotel in the neighborhood and was friendly with the brothers. She wrote back to say that "Petit Marguery is under new ownership but nothing has really changed although I have been back just once since the new guy took over."

Last time we were there, we ended up joking with 2 of the freres Cousin about, what was to me, the 'secret ingredient' in their scrumptious coq au vin. It's the coq blood alright, or as we called it *very nouveau beaujolais :smile:

I'll miss them - since one of the brothers ran the kitchen, it's hard to say that no changes will take place over time. If you go, please let us know what you think - I'm sure you'll have a wonderful trip no matter where you go!

Hilary

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does anyone know their email address?

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does anyone know their email address?

Do you know if they have an e-mail address? There's none listed in last year's Michelin. I don't have the 2003 edition here.


Robert Buxbaum

WorldTable

Recent WorldTable posts include: comments about reporting on Michelin stars in The NY Times, the NJ proposal to ban foie gras, Michael Ruhlman's comments in blogs about the NJ proposal and Bill Buford's New Yorker article on the Food Network.

My mailbox is full. You may contact me via worldtable.com.

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i do not. maybe u can help, s' il vous plaît?

a) what is the "correct" name: 'Le' Petit Marguery or 'Au' Petite Marguery - both repeatedly used

&

b) what does "Marguery" mean? closest i come is a trout marguery sauce, however, that is feminine, &

therefore, would not go with the masculine pronoun 'Le'; so i can only assume Marguery refers/means

something else.

merci beaucoup!

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There's probably not much help I can give. Michelin omits mention of an article or preposition. The 2003 GaultMillau says "le." I believe it was also "le" at les pages jaunes. None of these list an e-mail address. Le Dauphin/Au Dauphin, a small restaurant in the 1st arr. seems to use both forms. Is this common? Marguery was a standard codified sauce, white wine, fish stock, cream or butter?, maybe thickened with egg yolk. Served mostly with white fishes and often with shrimp, mussels and white mushrooms if memory serves. Then again I may not have had classic versions of it.

This may be the source of name confusion. - Au Petit Marguery


Robert Buxbaum

WorldTable

Recent WorldTable posts include: comments about reporting on Michelin stars in The NY Times, the NJ proposal to ban foie gras, Michael Ruhlman's comments in blogs about the NJ proposal and Bill Buford's New Yorker article on the Food Network.

My mailbox is full. You may contact me via worldtable.com.

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The correct name is Au Petit Marguery, 9 bd du Port-Royal, 13th (01.43.31.58.59). I ate there in early December. too soon after the change in ownership to note any changes. I posted a review a few months ago, but I am afraid I can't recover the thread at this moment. As far as I know, no email, but the new management may change that!!! They do answer the phone and agreeably respond to questions, but I did not try them in English. I too have pestered people to check out the new regime, but no one has taken the bite, not even a well-known poster in these parts who has a professional interest in such matters. Oh well, perhaps he is on holiday.

The le/au confusion is omnipresent, but the pages jaunes has "Au".

Here are the main points of that earlier posting:

One sea-food ravioli: a surprisingly good combination of oriental style shrimp-based ravioli in a Mediterranean zuppe de pesce-like broth. One pheasant terrine: disappointing. I could have had better charcuterie from almost any corner-deli in town. And the cornichons were nowhere to be found. The pleasant French couple at the table close by ordered the assortment of terrines. I did not taste theirs but by appearance, the food did not look significantly different, i.e. better, than mine.

Mixture of five wild mushrooms, roasted with garlic: nothing too exciting. I found them a bit dry and stringy. The garlic was not as assertive as I would have liked. I ordered the biche (i.e. doe), one of the tastiest bits of meat I have ever eaten. I had never ordered doe before since I don't think it has appeared on any menu in the States. Perhaps restaurateurs fear that serving bambi might drive even some dedicated carnivores into the arms of PETA. In my case however, it only reinforced my carnivorous instincts. Doe, as prepared at Au Petit Marguery, is superb, even better than any venison dishes I have enjoyed. About four-five years ago I had venison at Jean-Georges' NY restaurant and this Paris dish was superior.

The doe was very simply prepared, seared to a pleasing crispness on the outside, the outer flesh, almost caramelized in sweetness. Inside the flesh had a gamy richness that everyone at the table enjoyed (I did not tell my daughters they were eating bambi -- just steak). The meat was poised on a richly buttered bit of toast and surrounded by large tear-dropped shaped purees of winter root vegetables, different turnips and potatoes. The tastes complimented each other well.

Dessert, a well-made crème brulee. The mignardaises consisted of crystallized citrus peel and lovely light and tasty butter cookies.

We sat at the entry of the restaurant, designated for no-smokers. None of the other nearby diners, all French, smoked either. The interior of the restaurant is lovely, perhaps more attractive, but the bright airy room where we dined suited us well.

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The le/au confusion is omnipresent, but the pages jaunes has "Au".

I stand corrected. It is "au" on les pages jaunes. I rechecked GM again and that one does have "le."


Robert Buxbaum

WorldTable

Recent WorldTable posts include: comments about reporting on Michelin stars in The NY Times, the NJ proposal to ban foie gras, Michael Ruhlman's comments in blogs about the NJ proposal and Bill Buford's New Yorker article on the Food Network.

My mailbox is full. You may contact me via worldtable.com.

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many merci's! i think i now finally understand. bux, in the link to the movie", it is "au ... in the title, which translates as "at the ...

in the body of the review, the restaurant itself is referred to as "Le ..., which obviously translate to "The...; therefore, it appears that the ACTUAL name of the restaurant is "Le Petit Marguery", but when one REFERS to "Le Restaurant", the "au" is used. WHEW!! now i know why i'm having so much trouble learning French!!!!

as to marguery, thx bux. seems like an odd name "The Little/Small White Sauce" ??

also, would be curious as to changes in quality since the departure of the freres cousin, who where, of course, the reason why the restaurant was so popular.

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Au Petit Marguery (in the 13th) is always on our dining list when we're in Paris--especially in the fall and winter, when the appetizer of fresh wood mushrooms is on the carte. The prix-fixe menu is now 37€, still a very good buy; the mushrooms require a supplement of 8€ as an entrée (we discovered too late that we could have ordered them as a main course). Next time...

My husband and I began with the mushrooms, of course: this time cêpes and girolles gently sautéed in olive oil, a hint of garlic, and parsley--they were delectable and unforgettable. Our friend had melon balls in Sauternes, also very tasty.

For our main course my husband had lamb, while our friend chose salmon. I had a pièce de boeuf aux cêpes (again!) in a lovely, rich red wine sauce--in the European manner I used bread to mop up every drop. We had a good bottle of Gevrey-Chambertin to accompany the mushrooms and the main courses.

For dessert we had soufflées Grand Marnier, while our friend had her favorite: crème brûlée.

It was an excellent meal, and the restaurant remains high on our list for Paris dining. Service is stylish, and the atmosphere is often like that of a celebration--family groups come for birthdays, and everyone seems to be having a very good time. Reservations are a must.

Au Petit Marguery is located at 9, Bd. Port-Royal.

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Au Petit Marguery (in the 13th) is always on our dining list when we're in Paris--especially in the fall and winter, when the appetizer of fresh wood mushrooms is on the carte.  The prix-fixe menu is now 37€, still a very good buy; the mushrooms require a supplement of 8€ as an entrée (we discovered too late that we could have ordered them as a main course).  Next time...

My husband and I began with the mushrooms, of course:  this time cêpes and girolles gently sautéed in olive oil, a hint of garlic, and parsley--they were delectable and unforgettable. Our friend had melon balls in Sauternes, also very tasty.

For our main course my husband had lamb, while our friend chose salmon. I had a pièce de boeuf aux cêpes (again!) in a lovely, rich red wine sauce--in the European manner I used bread to mop up every drop.  We had a good bottle of Gevrey-Chambertin to accompany the mushrooms and the main courses.

For dessert we had soufflées Grand Marnier, while our friend had her favorite: crème brûlée.

It was an excellent meal, and the restaurant remains high on our list for Paris dining.  Service is stylish, and the atmosphere is often like that of a celebration--family groups come for birthdays, and everyone seems to be having a very good time.  Reservations are a must.

Au Petit Marguery is located at 9, Bd. Port-Royal.

I aggree au petit marguery is an excellent choice for tradionnal cuisine.Gibier in the fall is a must ,specially lievre royal a bit later.

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While looking for places to go to in Paris in three weeks, I came across a few threads for this restaurant.

Anyone been in the past few years?

The last posts talked about new owners a few years ago.

Merci.


Philly Francophiles

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While looking for places to go to in Paris in three weeks, I came across a few threads for this restaurant.

Anyone been in the past few years?

The last posts talked about new owners a few years ago.

Merci.

Not since the three stooges sold it; it got too pricey for food better gotten elsewhere.

PS Three stoges is a compliment, the brothers were a comedy team.


John Talbott

blog John Talbott's Paris

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30 some odd Eros for a 3 course dinner including Souflée is hardly pricey. I ate there last May and I would say better than ever. It stays high on my list on most all trips to Paris.

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Quick update: as you know from the Digest it has reopened and been reviewed and I'll report next month on it.


John Talbott

blog John Talbott's Paris

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Quick update: as you know from the Digest it has reopened and been reviewed and I'll report next month on it.

Sorry that I forget to cross-reference the report; I may induce Colette to try it again next week.

John Talbott

blog John Talbott's Paris

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I am very sad to report that the Petit Marguery that I have frequented for years and loved seems to be a thing of the past. This used to be such a perfect example of a traditional Parisian restaurant with an old-fashioned decor, impeccable service, and well-executed classic dishes.

During my visit last week, the staff was new and seemed very confused (did not offer to take care of our heavy winter coats right away, forgot one of the desserts, etc, etc). The food was only average and prices on the high side. My mother had a similar experience a few weeks ago so this was not just an "off" night. This is very sad. The clueless service was especially disconcerting and became an annoyance.

On the other hand, I have discovered a new place nearby that is very nice (short review to come).

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