• Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

torakris

The Kimchi Topic

198 posts in this topic

I tried a quick search and it was not fruitful.

As the title implies, I wish to make kim chi. I have located several recipes, Korean chili powder, and a host of other components, but I still have a few questions.

I am getting conflicting information if I should use a tightly sealed vessel to ferment the kim chi or if I should use one covered only with a cloth. "Quick and Easy Korean Cooking" says use a tightly sealed jar and I have a large number of 1/2 gallon mason jars available if needed, or could I use 6qt plastic containers with a snap on lid, or do I need something else?

Anything to leave out of the Kim Chi, such as:

1) Bok Choy(I am awash in the stuff from the garden right now)

2) Summer Squash (as above)

3) Kohlrabi with or without greens (as above)

4) Broccoli (Soon to be as above)

5) Western cabbage (soon to be as above)

6) Carrots

7) Celery

Any other observations, experiences, or suggestions?

Thank You,

BH

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We use those Ziploc containers. They work well. The containers with the folding snap locks work the best to prevent your fridge from reeking of kimchi.

Most all the ingredients you listed would make good kimchis on their own. Celery may be a bit watery and could work as a water kimchi. There's a good book that's been translated into English called Good Morning, Kimchi! by Sook-ja Yoon, which has some more international kimchi recipes, like broccoli. I really want to experiment with them one day.

In the meantime, may I humbly suggest my recipe--simply because I know firsthand that it works.

ZenKimchi's Signature Kimchi

Good luck!


<a href='http://www.zenkimchi.com/FoodJournal' target='_blank'>ZenKimchi Korean Food Journal</a> - The longest running Korean food blog

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you, I stopped reading your linked site only to return here and give thanks. I will check at Amazon for that book.

Any other help or advice would be appreciated.

Temperature advice would be helpful also, I have a second fridge that can be dedicated to this effort.


Edited by billyhill (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ZenKimchi,

In your recipe, did you use a 15% brine solution in your final product? I saw how you had salted it first, then gone with the brine. Did you retain this brine for the fermenting process or replace the liquid? I gather that you drained it and rinsed, but other sources are retaining the brine fluid for later use.

When you say in you blog " two parts gochugaru to 1 part fish sauce, I assume you are talking by volume.

Sorry to be obsessing with details, I appreciate your help.

BH

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Vegetarian nappa kimchi:

How necessary are the brined shrimp or fish sauce? I assume their function (as well as sugar) is to promote fermentation. Is there a traditional Korean alternative, or are they even needed?


Monterey Bay area

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Buddhist temple style kimchi uses overripened fruits, like persimmons. If you're interested in really extreme vegan Korean cuisine go for temple food. I think it's picking up as a trend with the general populace in Korea.


<a href='http://www.zenkimchi.com/FoodJournal' target='_blank'>ZenKimchi Korean Food Journal</a> - The longest running Korean food blog

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Buddhist temple style kimchi uses overripened fruits, like persimmons. If you're interested in really extreme vegan Korean cuisine go for temple food. I think it's picking up as a trend with the general populace in Korea.

Is the over ripe fruit to provide the pungency that the absent seafood would or does it aid in fermentation? Interesting.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just bought a package of kimchi from the nearest Korean fast food.. How I wish that i can make this spicy food by my own :)

Love the taste so much


Food photos that make you hungry - Hungry Food Photography

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I made a really simple kimchi from shaved nasturtium pods. I though it made for a pretty cool, if labor intensive condiment. Nasturtium pods have an intense, almost wasabi like flavor, and when you cure them, they mellow a bit and get a little funky. Next time I'll add some chili and lemon.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would like to try making some kimchi. I'm just wondering if any of you have bought any books on how to do this and if you have any suggestions?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am also wondering if, since you can't get brine shrimp in Australia, you can substitute shrimp paste in equal quantity, or what a viable alternative would be.

Kimchi has quickly become one of my favourite foods since I started my last job, and I'd like to try my hand as well.

The key to the kimchi where I work is leaving it at room temp for a few days before refrigerating it. Well, at least that's what I'm told.


James.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the reply. What kind of things do they eat it with at your restaurant? I'm looking at a book on amazon called 'The kimchi Chronicles'. It looks interesting. It says it's for an American kitchen.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

At Momofuku, we've been serving it by itself, braising ribs in the kimchi base paste, using it with roasted cauliflower or brussels sprouts (usually white kimchi), making shrimp cracker style puffs with it using tapioca starch, and pureeing it for various accompaniments. The recipe in the Momofuku cookbook is a good start.


James.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Broken English,

I've got a Momofoku cook-book. Although I haven't tried any of their recipes yet. I have now though just got together enough ingredients to make one of their somen noodle soups with tofu and potatoe if I remember correctly. Maybe you are the person I should ask if I have any questions......? I'm surprised there haven't been any more replies to this thread. Thought kimchi would be quite popular. What did you think of the book from amazon I mentioned above Broken English?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are some Korean recipes on the web you can try before purchasing a book. http://www.maangchi.com/recipe/napa-cabbage-kimchi or http://aeriskitchen.com/2009/01/napa-cabbage-kimchi-%EB%B0%B0%EC%B6%94-%EA%B9%80%EC%B9%98baechu-kimchi/ are places to start. Although I have enjoyed the Momofuku cookbook, I found the kimchi too sweet for my taste. I've been influenced by my mom's Korean friends that make a spicier kimchi.

Making kimchi is a fun weekend project. For me, the joy of making my own kimchi is that I get to eat both fresh kimchi (which I really enjoy) as well as the fermented/funky kimchi. I find cucumber kimchi to be very refreshing in the summer. You may also want to take a peek and see if there are any tips in the Elsewhere in Asia/Pacific: Cooking & Baking forum. Good luck and let us know how your adventures go.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been looking at the web site above Maangchi.com. Really interesting. She uses Napa cabbage. I haven't seen it around here in the UK. What could I use in it's place? Any ideas?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Anybody found a good supplier of gochugaru (chilli flakes) in the UK?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Young radish greens (from daikon) are also delicious. I imagine other radish greens would also work

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been looking at the web site above Maangchi.com. Really interesting. She uses Napa cabbage. I haven't seen it around here in the UK. What could I use in it's place? Any ideas?

You can find Napa Cabbage in the Uk, here at Ocado ex. but I remember buying also from Chinese stores in London

http://www.ocado.com/webshop/product/Chinese-Leaf-Waitrose/19010011

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.