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torakris

The Kimchi Topic

198 posts in this topic

Kimchi, don't make it bad

Take a sad song and make it better

Remember to let them eat your heart

Then you can start to make it better

Kimchi, don't be afraid

You were made to go out and be ate

The minute you let them bite your skin

Then you begin to make it better

And anytime you feel the pain, kimchi, refrain

Don't carry the world upon your shoulders

For well you know that it's a fool who plays it cool

By making his world a little colder

Na Na Na Na Na Na-Na-Na-Na-Na

Kimchi, don't let me down

You have fermented, now go and let them

Remember to let them eat your heart

Then you can start to make it better

So let it out and let it in, kimchi, begin

You're waiting for someone to perform with

And don't you know that it's just you, kimchi, you'll do

The movement you need is on your shoulder

Na Na Na Na Na Na-Na-Na-Na-Na

Kimchi, don't make it bad

Take a sad song and make it better

Remember to let bite your skin,

Then you'll begin to make it

Better better better better better better, YEAH.

Na na na, na-na-na-na, na-na-na-na, kimchi...

Na na na, na-na-na-na, na-na-na-na, kimchi...

Na na na, na-na-na-na, na-na-na-na, kimchi...

Na na na, na-na-na-na, na-na-na-na, kimchi...

(repeat X times)


"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

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On Japanese tv last night they were showing a "kimchi" made with live octopus.

the octopus was chopped into little pieces and these little pieces were wriggling all over the cutting board, then they tossed them with a kimchi "sauce" and they were served still wriggling. :blink:


<p><strong>Kristin Wagner</strong>, aka "torakris"

Manager, Membership

<a class="bbc_email" href="mailto:kwagner@egstaff.org" title="E-mail Link">kwagner@egstaff.org</a></p>

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I'd like to be under the sea

Eating octopus kimchi in the shade

He'd let us in, knows where we've been

Eating octopus kimchi in the shade

I'd ask my friends to come and see

And eat octopus kimchi with me

I'd like to be under the sea

Eating octopus kimchi in the shade.

We would be warm below the storm

In our little hideaway beneath the waves

Resting our head on the sea bed

Eating octopus kimchi near a cave

We would sing and dance around

because we know we can't be found

I'd like to be under the sea

Eating octopus kimchi in the shade

We would shout and swim about

The coral that lies beneath the waves

(Lies beneath the ocean waves)

Oh what joy for every girl and boy

Knowing they're happy and they're safe

(Happy and they're safe)

We would be so happy you and me

No one there to tell us what to do

I'd like to be under the sea

Eating octopus kimchi with you.


"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

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I'd like to be under the sea

Eating octopus kimchi in the shade

He'd let us in, knows where we've been

Eating octopus kimchi in the shade

I'd ask my friends to come and see

And eat octopus kimchi with me

I'd like to be under the sea

Eating octopus kimchi in the shade.

We would be warm below the storm

In our little hideaway beneath the waves

Resting our head on the sea bed

Eating octopus kimchi near a cave

We would sing and dance around

because we know we can't be found

I'd like to be under the sea

Eating octopus kimchi in the shade

We would shout and swim about

The coral that lies beneath the waves

(Lies beneath the ocean waves)

Oh what joy for every girl and boy

Knowing they're happy and they're safe

(Happy and they're safe)

We would be so happy you and me

No one there to tell us what to do

I'd like to be under the sea

Eating octopus kimchi with you.

Your Poem is very Beautiful. It seems so after we have just eaten two types of "kimchi" purchased this afternoon at a Korean Market on Aurora Avenue in Seattle/Shoreline Area. They were both new to us and interesting

The two new types were both fermented. "Octopus", in a red kimchee sauce and "Skate", also in a red kim chee base. We both prefered the Octopus. This seems to generate a natural "High", brought to it's summit by your timely poem, or the Korean Beers that we imbibed during the tasting. Irwin


I don't say that I do. But don't let it get around that I don't.

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Eat skate kimchi: there is a barber showing photographs

Of every head he's had the pleasure to know.

And all the people that come and go

Stop and say hello.

On the corner is a banker with a motorcar,

The little children laugh at him behind his back.

And the banker never wears a mack

In the pouring rain, very strange.

Skate kimchi is in my ears and in my eyes.

There beneath the blue suburban skies

I sit, and meanwhile back

Eat skate kimchi: there is a fireman with an hourglass

And in his pocket is a portrait of the Queen.

He likes to keep his fire engine clean,

It's a clean machine.

Skate kimchi is in my ears and in my eyes.

A four of fish and finger pies

In summer, meanwhile back

Behind the shelter in the middle of a roundabout

The pretty nurse is selling poppies from a tray

And tho' she feels as if she's in a play

She is anyway.

Eat skate kimchi: the barber shaves another customer,

We see the banker sitting waiting for a trim.

And then the fireman rushes in

From the pouring rain, very strange.

Skate kimchi is in my ears and in my eyes.

There beneath the blue suburban skies

I sit, and meanwhile back.

Skate kimchi is in my ears and in my eyes.

There beneath the blue suburban skies...

Skate kimchi.


"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

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The two new types were both fermented. "Octopus", in a red kimchee sauce and "Skate", also in a red kim chee base. We both prefered the Octopus. This seems to generate a natural "High", brought to it's summit by your timely poem, or the Korean Beers that we imbibed during the tasting. Irwin

Mmmh...skate kimchi. In Korea, skate is known as hong-eo. It is usually fermented before it is served and has a distinct ammonia smell that most people find completely offputting, but I like it. Hong-eo is a specialty of the Cheolla-do region of Korea, in the southwest.

Skate may be served in several ways -- as hong-eo hoe (which is raw fermented skate), as hong-eo jjim, or as samhyop (which is a bossam-type dish, with three components: kimchi, fermented skate, and pork). The last is the version that got me on Korean television. I was in Cheolla-do style restaurant in Seoul one night, eating samhyop, when a TV crew came in to do a feature and was so shocked to find a westerner eating it that I made the news.

One of the most sublime combinations is khat kimchee (mustard greens), makkoli (a milky Korean fermented rice beer), and hong-eo hoe. Khat kimchee and makkoli are also traditional "country" foods that many young Koreans won't go near.

Jim


Jim Jones

London, England

Never teach a pig to sing. It only wastes your time and frustrates the pig.

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It's nice that this thread was bumped; I have an interest in possibly making some kimchi, since the time is right.

I recently bought a commercially prepared version that I'd never tried before, and it was... lacking. Not enough chili, not enough garlic; blah.

Several years ago, I made a batch of basic cabbage kimchi (cabbage, daikon, green onion, garlic, red pepper, ...) that was totally awesome. I was working from vague advice from a Korean friend, and a recipe that I've long since lost, if there ever was one, and I didn't take any notes about it. Grrr.

Anyway, while preparing for an office move at work, I came across a printout of a recipe for Baechu Kimchi (Napa cabbage kimchi) from 1999, derived from the link originally posted in this thread (www.kimchi.co.kr/english/; 1999 link is now dead.) The original link's recipe called for 2 Napas (and was a bit rough in translation); the current recipe (clicky) calls for 30 kg (66 pounds for the metrically-impared) of Napa! Yow!! I just want enough for myself, not the whole neighborhood.

I can probably improvise a recipe from the information I already have, and even if it's a failure, it's no great loss, but if anyone has a good recipe for a mere one (or two) head(s) of Napa, I'm interested in it.

Um, er, a recipe may have been provided upthread, but I'm too laz...er, BUSY, to have done more than a cursory look.

Enquiring minds want to know...

edit: minor clarification and de-obfuscate baechu recipe


Edited by Human Bean (log)

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After an all-too-brief review of this page of the thread, I have to admit a fawning admiration for Jinmyo's lyrics. :wub::wub::wub: The printer is churning away for later sing-alongs.

They won't mean anything to those that don't know that Paul McCartney was in a band before Wings (and certainly nothing to those who haven't a clue about Paul McCartney anyway; he IS getting on a bit, and is a vegetarian besides :sad:), and no disrepect to mrs Lennon and Starr, whose lyrics also contributed.

That said, carry on!

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There was an interesting (tiny) article on the last page of my Japanese newspaper yesterday (Asahi Shimbun) about kimchi imports in Korea.

Apparently Korea (which starting importing kimchi from China in 1996) as of the first half of this year now imports more kimchi from China then it exports to China. 19,000 tons versus just under 16,000 tons. Apparently the Chinese kimchi which costs 50 to 60% then its Korean counterpart is used mostly in the prepared lunches given to students and (mostly factory) workers.

Not that it means anything, I just found it interesting. :wink:


<p><strong>Kristin Wagner</strong>, aka "torakris"

Manager, Membership

<a class="bbc_email" href="mailto:kwagner@egstaff.org" title="E-mail Link">kwagner@egstaff.org</a></p>

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Original English Text:

What's your favorite kimchi? What is one of the most unusual ones you have eaten?

Translated to French:

Quel est votre kimchi préféré? Quel est un de les plus peu communs que vous avez mangés?

Translated back to English:

Which is your kimchi preferred? Which is one of not very common that you ate?

Translated to German:

Welches ist Ihr bevorzugtes kimchi? Welches ist eins von nicht sehr allgemeinen, die Sie aßen?

Translated back to English:

Which is your preferential kimchi? Which is one of not very general, which ate you?

Translated to Italian:

Quale è il vostro kimchi preferenziale? Quale è uno di non molto generali, che li hanno mangiati?

Translated back to English:

Which it is yours kimchi preferential? Which is one a lot does not generate them, than they have eats them to you?

Translated to Portuguese:

Qual é seu kimchi preferential? Qual é um muito não os gera, do que têm lheos comem?

Translated back to English:

Which is preferential its kimchi? Which is one very does not generate them, of that they have lheos eat?

Translated to Spanish:

¿Cuál es preferencial su kimchi? ¿Cuál es uno muy no los genera, de eso que hacen que los lheos coman?

Translated back to English:

Which is preferential his kimchi? Which is one very does not generate them, of which they cause that the lheos eat?

Hope this helps,

Bruce

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Picture yourself in a boat on a river,

With bulgogi trees and bibimbap skies.

Somebody calls you, you answer quite slowly,

A girl with oi sabagi eyes.

Yukkaejang flowers of yellow and green,

Towering over your head.

Look for the girl with the tteok in her eyes,

And she's gone.

Lucy in the sky with kimchi.

Follow her down to a bridge by a fountain

Where rocking horse people eat shikumichi pies,

Everyone smiles as you drift past the flowers,

That grow so incredibly high.

Ojingo taxis appear on the shore,

Waiting to take you away.

Climb in the back with your head in the clouds,

And you're gone.

Lucy in the sky with kimchi,

Picture yourself on a train in a station,

With baekche porters with yachaejon ties,

Suddenly someone is there at the turnstyle,

The girl with the oi sabagi eyes.


"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

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Yeah, I guess these are really common in Korea, because all my relatives save one have a kimchi refrigerator.

I think they might even be selling them in L.A. now.


I love cold Dinty Moore beef stew. It is like dog food! And I am like a dog.

--NeroW

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yes. kimchi refrigerator is amazing. basically it provides same condition as storing kimchi in a pot under the ground. all koreans now have it.

my favorite kimchi is Bossam Kimchi- cabbage, octopus, chesnut, pine nut, date, other good things all wraped in a big cabbage.

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Welcome, pastis.

That kimchi sounds fabulous. Thanks for the link.


"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

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When I was a kid, growing up in Chicago, there was this pizza place we used to go to from time to time that was owned by Koreans. They made a kimchee pizza. It was basically a regular thin-crust pizza with kimchee under the cheese. I remember it being good when I was a kid. I don't remember what the place was called, where it was, or any details that would be helpful in this situation. I don't think it's around anymore.

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When is my kimchi ready to eat?

I made my second ever batch of kimchi a couple of days ago. I'd made a batch several years ago, and it turned out quite well, but it's been long enough that I've forgotten the details of what I did.

It's a basic cabbage kimchi, improvised by looking at various recipes, then doing what seemed right at the time. When freshly made it smelled good, but obviously didn't have the depth of fragrance that it should ultimately have.

It's now been sitting about 48 hours at about 19-20 degrees C, and I think it's got about another 24 hours or so to be 'done,' but I'm not sure. How do I know when it's ready to refrigerate?

At the moment, it's fragrant enough to be noticeable in the kitchen and immediate vicinity; it still smells right, but isn't overpowering.

Today, there were a few bubbles in the liquid (among the cabbage and at the top) but not many.

Needless to say, there is no evidence of mold or bacteria. If there were (and I think it'd have to have MAJOR problems for this to happen), I'd toss it.

I think I'm looking for a bit more smell, and some more bubbles, but I'm not sure. Advice?

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When is my kimchi ready to eat?

I made my second ever batch of kimchi a couple of days ago. I'd made a batch several years ago, and it turned out quite well, but it's been long enough that I've forgotten the details of what I did.

It's a basic cabbage kimchi, improvised by looking at various recipes, then doing what seemed right at the time. When freshly made it smelled good, but obviously didn't have the depth of fragrance that it should ultimately have.

It's now been sitting about 48 hours at about 19-20 degrees C, and I think it's got about another 24 hours or so to be 'done,' but I'm not sure. How do I know when it's ready to refrigerate?

At the moment, it's fragrant enough to be noticeable in the kitchen and immediate vicinity; it still smells right, but isn't overpowering.

Today, there were a few bubbles in the liquid (among the cabbage and at the top) but not many.

Needless to say, there is no evidence of mold or bacteria. If there were (and I think it'd have to have MAJOR problems for this to happen), I'd toss it.

I think I'm looking for a bit more smell, and some more bubbles, but I'm not sure. Advice?

I hope that people like Jinmyo and Kristen who prepare kimchi frequently will chime in, but I would ask a few questions before I answer.

What did you use for jeotgal? How much did you use? The stronger and the more jeotgal (fermented seafood) that you used, the shorter your fermentation would normally be, simply because the flavors will already be stronger. Similarly, I would use less warm fermentation time the more garlic I included. If it is a more gentle ginger-dominated kimchee like many Chinese restaurants in Korea make, I would allow a little more fermentation time.

Even more important is personal taste. How strong a flavor do you like in your kimchee?

What you may want to do is take the bulk of it and move it to the warmest part of your refrigerator in about 2-3 days, but separate out a small portion to leave out to strengthen further. That is then ideal to use for making kimchee jjigae, which requires a much stronger kimchee -- basically the equivalent of the kimchee left in late winter before spring arrives and the gentle fresh spring kimchees can be made from newly arrived ingredients.

When Koreans don't have old kimchee around, they will normally give what is in the refrigerator 3-5 days on the counter to strengthen before using it for jjigae.

Again, though, it really comes down to your personal preference and how you have seasoned your yangnyeom.

Good luck,

Jim


Jim Jones

London, England

Never teach a pig to sing. It only wastes your time and frustrates the pig.

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Jim made a lot of good points, it is usually to taste and a lot depends on what you have put in. I generally leave mine out for about 4 to 5 days at just about the same temp.


<p><strong>Kristin Wagner</strong>, aka "torakris"

Manager, Membership

<a class="bbc_email" href="mailto:kwagner@egstaff.org" title="E-mail Link">kwagner@egstaff.org</a></p>

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my favorite kimchi is Bossam Kimchi- cabbage, octopus, chesnut, pine nut, date, other good things all wraped in a big cabbage.

I love bosam kimchi, but i'm too lazy to make it. If you're in the L.A. area, you can go to YongSusan for it. I think it's the only branch they have outside Korea.


I love cold Dinty Moore beef stew. It is like dog food! And I am like a dog.

--NeroW

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Hi all. Fairly new here. Such a cool site. I have a suggestion on bo sam...a little place called Go Ba Woo on the northeast corner of Vermont and 7th Street in a small mall. I haven't been there in a while, but it was very good. Most of the places that do this really well, IMHO, are places where drinks (alcohol) are readily available.

Robert

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Robert

welcome to egullet!

Hope to hear more from you. :biggrin:


<p><strong>Kristin Wagner</strong>, aka "torakris"

Manager, Membership

<a class="bbc_email" href="mailto:kwagner@egstaff.org" title="E-mail Link">kwagner@egstaff.org</a></p>

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Welcome Robert!

I also say hope to hear more from you! Need more L.A. Koreans on this site.

Where are the best drinking places in your opinion? (Maybe this should be on California forum)


I love cold Dinty Moore beef stew. It is like dog food! And I am like a dog.

--NeroW

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Thank you all. Ever since I started cooking professionally, I haven't had the time to go out and find places to drink. Most of the evenings I get off, I try to get out to different eateries as much as possible. But from memory, good places would be Ju Mak 74 which is on Vermont between 7th and Wilshire. There is also a place which is very "old school" Korean. If you want food they used to eat in Korean bars, with the ambience as well, you should go to a place called Dang Sun Sah (sp) on 6th Street and New Hampshire. All very authentic places with all types of Korean drinks and anju (different types of food usually eaten with alcohol). Koreans and Asians in general, I think, like to eat something when we drink. Both places had great bo sam as well (I had to include it to stay within the topic of this forum). :biggrin:

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Only in Japan?

i8867.jpg

kimchi umeboshi

It was actually quite good. :biggrin:


<p><strong>Kristin Wagner</strong>, aka "torakris"

Manager, Membership

<a class="bbc_email" href="mailto:kwagner@egstaff.org" title="E-mail Link">kwagner@egstaff.org</a></p>

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