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Coffee Mugs

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We came in first! Go UMR!

Ceramic coffee mugs created by students at the University of Missouri-Rolla recently survived 12-foot falls onto asphalt in Coco Beach, Fla., to win the American Ceramic Society’s national Mug Drop Contest.

Good to the last drop: UMR team wins coffee mug competition


Edited by persiancook (log)

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I want to buy a few coffee mugs that have these characteristics: oversize (about 16oz.), handle large enough for 4 fingers and doesn't scald you after microwaving, solid color or tasteful design, dishwasher safe, preferably not more than about $20 and, most important, lead free. Any online source come to mind? I've done a lot of searching without much luck.

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Etsy has some good ceramic artisans who make stuff that will fulfill your needs.  My parents bought a set of mugs that were custom made and very nice, though more than $20 per mug. However, there is tons of stuff there. Most of what I found previously is lead free and dishwasher safe.

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Some stoneware heat up to very hot in a microwave oven.

 

dcarch

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I'm not clear if you are specifically looking for stoneware although you did say lead-free but you might also look into Tervis mugs. They might not meet your aesthetic but they are functional.

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I want to buy a few coffee mugs that have these characteristics: oversize (about 16oz.), handle large enough for 4 fingers and doesn't scald you after microwaving, solid color or tasteful design, dishwasher safe, preferably not more than about $20 and, most important, lead free. Any online source come to mind? I've done a lot of searching without much luck.

 

I'd certainly suggest Crate & Barrel.  These come to mind:  http://www.crateandbarrel.com/bennett-large-mug/s326526

 

And I have some big glass mugs that I use for whatever - coffee, soup, beer, chili, etc. 

 

Also, I have some ceramic coffee mugs that are exactly like what you've described.  I got them at Pier 1, several years ago.

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I have 4 sets of these  which allow plenty of headroom in case the liquid boils in the microwave.

OR you want to add a lot of foamed milk to your latte or cappuccino (or anything else that goes with coffee or tea)

 

I've used them for chai, caffe latte,  SOUP, hot milk.

 

 

I have several 16 ounce mugs, of various shapes and sizes and I much prefer the larger capacity - 18 oz or more.

 

Every time I try to reheat a normal (for me)  mug of coffee in the microwave, it boils over.  Has ever happened in these.


Edited by andiesenji (log)

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I have 4 sets of these  which allow plenty of headroom in case the liquid boils in the microwave.

OR you want to add a lot of foamed milk to your latte or cappuccino (or anything else that goes with coffee or tea)

 

I've used them for chai, caffe latte,  SOUP, hot milk.

 

 

I have several 16 ounce mugs, of various shapes and sizes and I much prefer the larger capacity - 18 oz or more.

 

Every time I try to reheat a normal (for me)  mug of coffee in the microwave, it boils over.  Has ever happened in these.

 

Andie, those look great.  Think I'll order some.

 

I actually have these: http://www.crateandbarrel.com/set-of-4-iittala-krouvi-beer-mugs/s579044

 

20oz capacity.  It says that they're not for hot liquids, but I've been using them for decades, for everything, including hot liquids that I heat in the microwave.  I love love love them. And I've very frequently given sets as gifts for weddings, housewarmings, etc.   But I'd probably be wise to get some of the ones to which you linked.  They might not be so pretty when they're holding beer, for example, but I wouldn't have to worry about heating them in the microwave.

 

Which I never have.

 

But which perhaps I should.


Edited by Jaymes (log)
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Andie, those look great.  Think I'll order some.

 

I actually have these: http://www.crateandbarrel.com/set-of-4-iittala-krouvi-beer-mugs/s579044

 

20oz capacity.  It says that they're not for hot liquids, but I've been using them for decades, for everything, including hot liquids that I heat in the microwave.  I love love love them. And I've very frequently given sets as gifts for weddings, housewarmings, etc.   But I'd probably be wise to get some of the ones to which you linked.  They might not be so pretty when they're holding beer, for example, but I wouldn't have to worry about heating them in the microwave.

 

Which I never have.

 

But which perhaps I should.

I used them for French onion soup a week or so ago when some friends dropped by.  They don't like the crouton and cheese on top so this was really simple to ladle the soup into the mugs and heat in the MW - after the soup has cooled a bit, it can be sipped directly from the mugs and the solids finished off with a spoon.

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I used them for French onion soup a week or so ago when some friends dropped by. 

 

That's actually on my bucket list. 

 

Being your friend.

 

And dropping by.

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I should have mentioned ceramic. Here's the kind of mug we've been using:

 

https://www.dogmt.com/Greetings-Mug.html

 

It meets almost all my criteria -- large capacity, 4-finger handle that doesn't get hot, tasteful (or at least amusing) design. The only problem is LEAD! With a simple pattern or plain color and lead-free glaze, it would be just right. Doesn't seem like it should be hard to find, but so far...

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I should have mentioned ceramic. Here's the kind of mug we've been using:

 

https://www.dogmt.com/Greetings-Mug.html

 

It meets almost all my criteria -- large capacity, 4-finger handle that doesn't get hot, tasteful (or at least amusing) design. The only problem is LEAD! With a simple pattern or plain color and lead-free glaze, it would be just right. Doesn't seem like it should be hard to find, but so far...

I think some of the mugs at MUG HEAVEN  will fit your requirements.  I have two or three -  16 oz  Sedona moon, and Ocean moon and one of the tankards - Cobalt mocha - that I use for iced coffee in the summer. 

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I should have mentioned ceramic. Here's the kind of mug we've been using:

 

https://www.dogmt.com/Greetings-Mug.html

 

It meets almost all my criteria -- large capacity, 4-finger handle that doesn't get hot, tasteful (or at least amusing) design. The only problem is LEAD! With a simple pattern or plain color and lead-free glaze, it would be just right. Doesn't seem like it should be hard to find, but so far...

Why do you think these cups have a leaded glaze? Have you asked?

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A web search brings up lots of sources that say any glazed ceramic mug that's cheap and made in Asia should be assumed to contain lead. Also, the one I showed is almost identical to several we got as public radio premiums, and our station recently sent out a warning about lead found in their mugs. 

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I understand the concern.  However, I was asking whether you know where the Dog Mountain mugs are made.  Even if the ceramic mugs are made in a country that's less lead-conscious than the Unites States, the finish may be done in Vermont at Dog Mountain.  They would be required to meet FDA approval for lead content as well as EPA approval for the amount of lead that can leach from the mug.  I don't know this particular operation except for what I've seen on their web site (what charming artwork!) but they sound like the type of operation that would be fairly safety- and health-conscious.

 

Here are links to a few of the many web sites I found discussing the likelihood of lead in a glaze, where you're likely to find it, and factors that affect its likelihood of leaching into your food:

 

Lakeside Pottery's article, "Lead in Ceramics and Pottery - Consumer Issues", discusses the issues for the consumer as well as the potter.  Note their assertion that if the glaze is fired properly the lead should be bound and not leachable.  I ran across that assertion more than once, at different sites that did not seem to be quoting each other.

 

This peer-reviewed article from the University of California's Agriculture Department, "Lead Leaching in Ceramics Difficult to Predict",  may be enough to convince you that you'll only want to use clear glass dishes forevermore.  However, they also have tips on the types, styles and sources of new ceramic dishware that are most likely to be safe, and they give information on how you can test for lead.  Test kits are inexpensive and readily available, by the way, but I understand that you'd rather purchase without having to test.  

 

The Australian government's Department of the Environment has posted this fact sheet titled "Lead alert facts:  Lead in ceramics" that you may also find useful.

 

My sense is that new ceramic mugs made in this country are likely to be safe enough to purchase without worry.  Back in 2004 I tested several of my glazed pots for lead and satisfied myself that they were safe to use.  However, as the saying goes, Your Mileage May Vary.   :smile:

 

 

 

 

 

 

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I was an art teacher with a major in ceramics and made these on the wheel.  If I had not retired, I could make some for you but now that I don't have a kiln anymore I can't.  The face mug would fit your requirements I think.  They are stoneware, lead free and don't get hot in the microwave.  I generally preferred to make smaller ones so the coffee didn't get cold before the cup was empty.

 

DSCF1848_zps8c620c46.jpg

 

DSCF1849_zps1fef8fc0.jpg


Edited by Norm Matthews (log)

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