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Mountain Potato


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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 1 year later...

mixed some nagaimo with mekabu two nights ago and seasoned it with a bit of tsuyu (seasoned soy sauce), yum!

it was hard to keep on the chopsticks though...... :laugh:

gallery_6134_549_1105655174.jpg

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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Mmmm, this is making me hungry! That looks so good, Kristin.

Unfortunately, the last time I grated yama imo, I forgot about the itch factor, and it was not just itchy, my hands turned fire-engine red, and it was really uncomfortable! My husband quickly searched on the Internet, and told me about the vinegar trick, but it didn't work at all.

Oh well, the suffering aside, I mixed karashi mentaiko (spicy cod egg) with the grated yama imo, and it was really good!

By the way, did anyone else notice what I think of as the "Super Slime Bowl" at Maguro Ichiba (chain restaurant) this summer? It was a bowl of rice, very prettily topped with natto, grated yama imo, okra, raw squid, those tiny slimy brown mushrooms, and a raw egg. I guess you were supposed to swirl everything together and watch the slime webbing fly! :raz:

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  • 1 month later...

On "tonight's" episode of Burari, the host went to a restaurant where they served yamaimo (I didn't catch specficially which one, but a slimy one), where the yamaimo was grated into a slime, and mixed with miso and probably some green onions and other stuff, then served over mugi-gohan (barley rice).

Such a yamaimo was a specialty of the area the restaurant was in.

Has anyone tried mixing thier yamaimo with miso?

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On "tonight's" episode of Burari, the host went to a restaurant where they served yamaimo (I didn't catch specficially which one, but a slimy one), where the yamaimo was grated into a slime, and mixed with miso and probably some green onions and other stuff, then served over mugi-gohan (barley rice). 

Such a yamaimo was a specialty of the area the restaurant was in.

Has anyone tried mixing thier yamaimo with miso?

Sorry, I'm not a fan of yamaimo or tororo (grated yamaimo), but my father is. He is also a fan of jinenjo (wild yamaimo), which is slimier and more expensive than cultivated ones. Some people prefer adding soy sauce to tororo while others prefer miso, but I just can't recall which my father prefers...

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I do it both ways, though I think I slightly prefer the soy sauce/wasabi.

For some reason when I make the miso version I like it with sliced up (raw) okra added as well. Okra and miso go wonderfully together.

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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  • 3 weeks later...
  • 1 month later...

one of my favorite salads using nagaimo

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cut the nagaimo into large bite sized pieces place them into a bag and lightly smash them, add them to a bowl with cucumbers and tomatoes and dress them with equal parts of soy sauce, rice vinegar and a flavorless oil (like canola), then sprinkle the whole thing with a handful of katsuo bushi (bonito flakes)

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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At a restaurant in LA (Urasawa), the chef makes his tamago look and taste like sponge cake somehow, with the use of yamaimo. He said it took about 3 hours to make.

I like it roasted to as well as in salad. I have to admit, it did take a while for me to appreciate the sliminess, but I'm a convert.

I love cold Dinty Moore beef stew. It is like dog food! And I am like a dog.

--NeroW

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  • 1 month later...

I recently found a recipe book on Shojin Ryori (vegetarian Buddhist Monk foods), and there are quite a few recipes using yamaimo, so last night I tried an easy one:

yamato-imo no nori-maki:

grated mountain yam rolled in a piece of nori and fried until lightly golden brown, then rolled in a shoyu-ginger sauce.

It was pretty good! A nice new way to enjoy yamaimo!

ShisoNatto.jpg

Also shown is Kizami Natto no Ao-jiso Age, shiso-wrapped Natto tempura.

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Ok finally got my hands on some nagaimo this weekend and this is what I made as an appetizer for dinner:

Grated nagaimo topped with a generous heaping of uni and very thin strips of nori and bonito flakes drizzled with a sauce made of lightly diluted shoyu (the kind with konbu used for sashimi) mixed with wasabi.

Simple preparation and quite tasty indeed. Think I'm going to serve this next time I have people over for dinner.

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 2 weeks later...

When I was in Japan in the spring, the soup making store sold me some little square sheets of what she said would turn into tororo if I put it in my miso soup. Have you seen this? Is it basically freeze dried tororo?

Can I put it in cold soba tsuyu and will it still turn out okay or does it have to be hot?

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Has anyone tried Mukago?

It is also part of the mountain potato but since I've never had the opportunity to get it, it remains a mystery in terms of taste and texture for me.

150917-mukago.jpg

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When I was in Japan in the spring, the soup making store sold me some little square sheets of what she said would turn into tororo if I put it in my miso soup.  Have you seen this?  Is it basically freeze dried tororo?

Can I put it in cold soba tsuyu and will it still turn out okay or does it have to be hot?

Is it a sort of pale green?

it sounds like tororo konbu a kind of seaweed.

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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Yes, I have...it tastes a little more earthy than mountain potato, and is a little crisper and less slimy...but I have to admit it didn't make that much of an impression!

I too have had it, I see it mostly mixed in with rice.

It wasn't bad but not worth searching for...

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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Mountain potato with slices of maguro, scallions and soyu then put on hot rice... mmmmm.... Maybe a dash of bonito to top it off!

One of my favorites!

"Live every moment as if your hair were on fire" Zen Proverb

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