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Richard Kilgore

Book Recommendations-Fish &/or Game?

15 posts in this topic

I am interested in your comments on cookbooks and books of food essays on fish & game that you have found helpful, interesting...or on the other hand, a waste of time. I like the work of Jim Harrison, A.D. Livingston, and Rebecca Gray, among others.


Edited by Richard Kilgore (log)

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For fish Rick Stein in the UK has published a number of useful volumes. In particular "Rick Stein's Seafood", based on notes from his cookery school, has a lot of practical tips and an excellent gazateer of fish species in the back.

I've also found James Peterson's Fish and Shellfish very useful

Charlie Trotter's Seafood book is notable for being the only cookbook I know of where recipes are grouped by wine varietals, but like all his books the recipes are unmanageable unless you have several days and a cast of thousands.

Haven't got a clue about game

J


More Cookbooks than Sense - my new Cookbook blog!

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A Feast of Fish by Ian McAndrew is excellent for both recipes and some background information on the various varieties. He also wrote a book on game which I cannot recall the name of now.

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According to "The Art of Eating" (www.theartofeating.com) Mediterranean Seafood, 3rd Edition by Alan Davidson is a modern classic.

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Ariane Daguin's "D'Artagnan's Glorious Game Cookbook" is quite helpful. There is a section on most game meats currently available in the US with notes on best cooking methods etc and recipes from well-known chefs. Of course, most of what we get here is not true game but farm-raised, a pale substitute. To be able to cook wild game you will have to shoot it yourself or make friends with a hunter. The cooking methods would be basically the same but with longer marination. I believe venison and hare, imported from Scotland ,is available in season but have not tried it.


Ruth Friedman

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A Feast of Fish by Ian McAndrew is excellent for both recipes and some background information on the various varieties. He also wrote a book on game which I cannot recall the name of now.

Poultry & Game. Good books. What happened to Ian McAndrew? Haven't heard of him for years. Anything by Alan Davidson on fish.

v

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Ed Brown's (The Sea Grill Restaurant) The Modern Seafood Cook


"These pretzels are making me thirsty." --Kramer

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Alan Davidson's excellent books certainly, but they are more encyclopedic than recipe sources.

I think the book you need is The Sporting Wife Game and Fish cookery

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John Schumacher, chef at Schumacher's (a small, elegant hotel in New Prague with a wonderful restaurant) features a lot of game (here it's mostly wild game) on his menu. He has also authored several cookbooks:

Game/fish cookbooks by Schumacher


Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"

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Ariane Daguin's "D'Artagnan's Glorious Game Cookbook" is quite helpful. There is a section on most game meats currently available in the US with notes on best cooking methods etc and recipes from well-known chefs. Of course, most of what we get here is not true game but farm-raised, a pale substitute. To be able to cook wild game you will have to shoot it yourself or make friends with a hunter. The cooking methods would be basically the same but with longer marination. I believe venison and hare, imported from Scotland ,is available in season but have not tried it.

I think D'Artagnan sells game birds and wild hare, etc....some from Scotland. On the website (www.dartagnan.com) and in their catalogue, they warn you to "watch out for the shot"!


JJ Goode

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Encyclopedia of Fish Cookery by A.J. McClane.

McClane was editor of Field and Stream for some years. The book was considered seminal when it first appeared in the 70s.

edit: I don't know if Izaac Walton's "The Compleat Angler" will help you. But some good writing about fishing.

Nick


Edited by Nick Gatti (log)

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Try Richard Olneys The Good Cook Series for Time Life, and has amongst its 27 volumes, ones on Game and Fish Cookery, as with the series as a whole these are essential.

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