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maggiethecat

Cookbooks – How Many Do You Own? (Part 1)

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Heyjude, one of our Pacific Northwest members, has at LEAST 1000. Her apartment is wall to wall cookbooks.

Actually more like 3,000+!

I have 122 to add to the pile. About half pastry and dessert books.

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Heyjude, one of our Pacific Northwest members, has at LEAST 1000. Her apartment is wall to wall cookbooks.

Actually more like 3,000+!

I have 122 to add to the pile. About half pastry and dessert books.

Yeah, that was a VERY low estimate. I'm pretty sure she has more than anyone on this site.

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Around a hundred

Not enough - I put them all in a pile recently and was disappointed how small it looked

J

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oraklet   

haven't counted, but would be c. 50, mostly used for reference. or let's say 52, cause i just recieved "compl.tech." and "culin.artistr." from amazon.

"culinary artistry" is an amazing book. haven't read anything like it before. it's as eye-opening as "masse und macht".

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Yikes! 341 plus a couple boxes in the garage....make it 391. I used to read the classics. What happened to me?

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Anna N   

Only 45 - how humbling...

Anna N

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gknl   

272 in the house.

I may have moved a few to the garage and I think my sister "borrowed" some, but don't remember which ones or how many.

Not as bad as I thought though. :wink:

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s'kat   

I've got 42 cooking books that I have purchased or been given. I wasn't sure if I should add the 4 3-ring binders of print-outs and clippings that seem to accumulate around me.

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joler   

83 - not including books about food such as Bourdain's books or Ruth Reichl's books (although Ruth's do have some recipes in them). I thought that was excessive until I read how many you all have! I guess I'll have to log on to Jessica's Biscuit later today and spend some $$$. :raz:

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I must have a little over 100. However, knowing that many of you have more makes me want to go out and acquire more.

I'm lucky in that I live near a local library and can check out as many cookbooks as I want. I know they think I'm that crazy woman who only checks out piles of cookbooks, but that's their problem.

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ideefixe   

About 800 in the house and another 1,000 or so in storage. I have an Excel file that allegedly tells me what book is in which box.

But this pales by comparison to all the vinyl all over the house. A friend of my 16 year old's wanted to know if my husband is a DJ.

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Akiko   

Where do you people store these things? The other day I was looking at our overstuffed bookshelves thinking... we need another bookshelf, and then I had to realize that 50% of the books on the shelves are cookbooks and I sheepishly thought, maybe I should get rid of some of these instead and make some room for my husband's stuff...

I can't part with my beloved cookbooks.

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nerissa   

30.

As my boyfriend is a PhD student, we have books coming out of our ears. We were thinking about buying more bookshelfs and told our friends and they laughed--said that will only encourage you to buy more books and build piles. It is one of the perks of dating a PhD student. When seedling season starts, it can get nasty--plants and books competing for space!

Seriously--where do you guys find the space to store 200 + cookbooks?


Edited by nerissa (log)

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Seriously--where do you guys find the space to store 200 + cookbooks?

I took the doors off two large kitchen cabinets. The exposed shelves plus the top of the cabinets hold about 120, including the dozen or so that are stuffed sideways into the space above the standing books.

A baker's rack in the dining room holds another 60 or so; a short standalone bookshelf at the end of the island holds 80. The rest are lurking in the living room bookshelves where they get their own section among the non-fiction, or resting in a couple of boxes out in the garage, still packed up from the last move.

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Lady T   

Space? Space is FOR cookbooks. In the kitchen. By the bedside reading shelf (that's where two of John Thorne's books are sitting right now). In the literature section (M. F. K. Fisher country). Kitchen Confidential is in the bathroom (I wash my hands before AND after reading).

Somewhere around 340, Maggie.

:raz:

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160, give or take.

Now that we're finding out the general number of books owned within this group, I'd like to know how many actual titles are represented! :wacko:

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crumbs   

Well, I just looked up my Amazon.com account and realized we've bought over 65 cookbooks in the past two years through them alone! (And I have 6 on order now.) Our library has an annual book sale which is great for picking up some of the old classics.

I'm going to have to guess since I'm at the office that we're somewhere around 350.

We have two large bookcases full in the office, a cabinet in the kitchen, a baker's rack, & the side of our entertainment center. I also read tons of trash/detective/military/mystery paperbacks which take up another few hundred square feet of our tiny house. My husband has his collection of "How to Retire Young and Rich" style of books--which we might be able to do if we didn't spend so much money on the darn things! (Not to mention our 4 year old has his own huge stash--never join a kid's book club!!) :blink:

Debi

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