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battle of the collars


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I knew i read it somewhere!! I found out that i don't have the kama part, but it's ara (kama was more expensive yesterday, and i picked the bigger piece, cheaper one), what is ara? same preparation okay i supposed..

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Ara are basically the leftovers from when the fish is cut up and it can consist of many parts incluing head, backbone, innards etc. The kama (collar) is also consisdered an ara, but larger pieces are usually sold on their own.

The most common preparation for ara is simmered dishes and soups.

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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That's so strange, i went back to get another one, and no ara's left, just pure kama, but twice the price!!

Oh well, for a piece like the one I shown in pic, how long would you bake or broil it for? should i bake or broil?

Thanks!

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definitely broil!

that piece should take anywhere from 10 to 20 minutes depending on the heat.

Thanks!!!!

BTW, i'm making the tofu/mizuna salad with umeboshi/wasabi/mirin dressing.

It's SO helpful when you post pictures, otherwise, i have no clue how it's suppose to look like. Thank you so much!!

Pls keep up with these great simple recipe!

I'm also making the chinese cabbage and pork thing since i need another dish and these are stuff i have!! :)

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  • 1 year later...
  • 3 months later...
Tuna tends to dry out compared to yellowtail or other collars. Did you have this issue?

Is your question directed at me?

I understand that tuna tends to become mealy when cooked, but that collar turned out very tender and yummy when I grilled it in my toater oven. It didn't dry out if I remember correctly.

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  • 8 months later...

Yesterday, I noticed kanpachi kama sold for 298 yen per pack (probably 200 to 300 g) at a supermarket, and I just had to buy one. (I often see maguro and buri (adult yellowtail) kama sold but not kanpachi kama). I searched for a good recipe for shio-yaki. I found that recipes varied greatly in the period of time the kama was to be let stand after sprinkled with salt (from half a day to a few minutes). I decided to let it stand for two or three hours. Many recipes then say to wipe it with kitchen towels and sprinkle with salt again before grilling. I followed this step.

The resulting kanpachi kama shio-yaki was very good! My children liked it.

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  • 1 month later...
I searched for a good recipe for shio-yaki.  I found that recipes varied greatly in the period of time the kama was to be let stand after sprinkled with salt (from half a day to a few minutes).  I decided to let it stand for two or three hours.  Many recipes then say to wipe it with kitchen towels and sprinkle with salt again before grilling.  I followed this step.

The resulting kanpachi kama shio-yaki was very good!  My children liked it.

I tried this technique for some buri kama I picked up and it was the best collar I have had! Thanks! :biggrin:

We started eating before I remembered to take the picture...

gallery_6134_5519_467415.jpg

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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Just wondering where you let the salted collar sit for those two to three hours. I usually let mine sit for half an hour on the counter, but any longer than that and I'd want to put it in the fridge. Would refrigeration affect the salting process?

In my case, I put it in the fridge. I think putting it on the countertop for hours is dangerous even in winter.

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Forgot to add:

The other day, I used the same technique and this expensive salt.

gallery_16375_4595_59479.jpg

The resultant grilled kanpachi kama was even better!

I also let my sit in the refrigerator. Now I need to get myself some expensive salt! :biggrin:

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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I'm kind of addicted to kanpachi kama.

I bought one pack for 250 yen today.

Sprinkled with salt again, ready for grilling:

gallery_16375_4595_64680.jpg

Grilled:

gallery_16375_4595_62495.jpg

I used the salt shown upthread (Sasanagare no shio). The kama turned out to be a little salty. Too much of a good thing. Yet very tasty.

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hiroyuki, your salting technique sounds very similar to brining (except for the elimination of water). I often use brining when cooking chicken and pork...especially when making tonkatsu as it makes for an extremely juicy dish.

was your fish juicier or did it just taste better overall? I'd like to try your method the next time I eat fish

BEARS, BEETS, BATTLESTAR GALACTICA
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hiroyuki, your salting technique sounds very similar to brining (except for the elimination of water).  I often use brining when cooking chicken and pork...especially when making tonkatsu as it makes for an extremely juicy dish.

was your fish juicier or did it just taste better overall?  I'd like to try your method the next time I eat fish

Sorry, I know little about brining. The first step (sprinkling with salt) is supposed to get rid of the bad smell. I think the longer you let it stand, the more the salt penetrates it. The resulting kama is really tasty, making me think that salt is the best seasoning of all.

As for white fish, however, it is genrally said that you should sprinkle it with salt immediately before grilling, otherwise, the fish will get firm.

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  • 1 year later...

Yesterday, I noticed kanpachi kama sold for 298 yen per pack (probably 200 to 300 g) at a supermarket, and I just had to buy one. (I often see maguro and buri (adult yellowtail) kama sold but not kanpachi kama). I searched for a good recipe for shio-yaki. I found that recipes varied greatly in the period of time the kama was to be let stand after sprinkled with salt (from half a day to a few minutes). I decided to let it stand for two or three hours. Many recipes then say to wipe it with kitchen towels and sprinkle with salt again before grilling. I followed this step.

The resulting kanpachi kama shio-yaki was very good! My children liked it.

Update:

My complaint about most buri kama shio-yaki (salt-grilled yellowtail collar) recipes is that they do not specify the amount of salt to sprinkle. They simply use ambiguous words like "shoushou" (small amout) and "teki ryo" (appropriate amount).

I have made at least two mistakes of sprinkling with too much salt, resulting in very salty kama.

Now I don't make the same mistake any more, because I stick to 1 teaspoon of salt (for about 300 g kama), or a little less than 2% of the weight of the kama.

And I now don't follow the step of salting again before grilling because I don't want to increase my salt intake.

My most recent salt-grilled buri kama

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