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Sushi Yasuda


jaybee
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Based on one at each, spaced years apart, Yasuda is lightyears better.

Poetically put! Nice show, Sneakeater!

u.e.

“Watermelon - it’s a good fruit. You eat, you drink, you wash your face.”

Italian tenor Enrico Caruso (1873-1921)

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  • 2 weeks later...

I've finally edited my photos from a recent omakase at Yasuda's station.

You can see my Sushi Yasuda set either as a slideshow or you can read the descriptions and comments from the individual photos on the Sushi Yasuda set page (click on the photos).

Enjoy!

u.e.

“Watermelon - it’s a good fruit. You eat, you drink, you wash your face.”

Italian tenor Enrico Caruso (1873-1921)

ulteriorepicure.com

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Great pictures u.e. I have reservations for next month, but after seeing your pics I'm tempted to make another one for sooner! I can't wait to try the uni from Maine--I hope they have it when I'm there. I had always heard and read that the uni from the Californian Coast demanded the highest prices and hence was of the highest quality. I guess Yasuda believes differently, or did I misunderstand your comments?

I've never tried ankimo either. Is it mainly a textural treat or is there a distinct flavor profile (aside from the poaching medium)?

Did Yasuda happen to mention what kind of sea salt he uses/prefers?

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Great pictures u.e.  I have reservations for next month, but after seeing your pics I'm tempted to make another one for sooner!  I can't wait to try the uni from Maine--I hope they have it when I'm there.  I had always heard and read that the uni from the Californian Coast demanded the highest prices and hence was of the highest quality.  I guess Yasuda believes differently, or did I misunderstand your comments?

1. Don't ever allude to any one product at Yasuda as being "better" than another - he will sternly reinforce that he sources only the best.

2. That being said, as I understand it, you are correct, generally, the W.C. variety do command higher prices. However, Yasuda has resourced the best uni from the E.C. - that being these puppies from Maine... they are of such high quality that they are exportable to Japan. I assume what this means is that, unlike most unis from the E.C., this one is comparable or on par with those that are exportable from the W.C. - perhaps more rare? I'm not sure. Regardless, I preferred the E.C. to the W.C. variety.

I've never tried ankimo either.  Is it mainly a textural treat or is there a distinct flavor profile (aside from the poaching medium)?

Ankimo is a must for me everytime I visit a high quality sushi bar. It's sort of my personal "standard" by which I measure a place. That's not fair, I realize as sushi bars are much more about the fish and and shellfish than the peripherals... the way I look at it is - if their ankimo is fresh, then the other stuff must be pretty good too. The texture is almost like silken tofu - with just enough fat and heft to make it terribly rich and decadent. I call it the foie gras of the sea. Uni, I call butter of the sea.... :raz:

Did Yasuda happen to mention what kind of sea salt he uses/prefers?

He didn't mention it, and I didn't bother to ask... sorry. I am tempted to venture something silly like Maldon - just by the way the salt appeared... But why a Japanese chef would source British salts, I have no clue. You can see the salt crystals on some of my pictures (especially on my Maine uni redux picture)... but overall, the "crunch" factor was low as most of the salts had melted onto the wet surface of the fish before you could get your mouth around the nigiri - especially if you're stopping to take photos, like me... oh, the sacrifices I make for the sake of eGulleters!! :laugh: The other thing is that Yasuda's hands are almost constantly wet and moist from the rice and fish, so a lot of the salt is just flavoring... I particularly remember being able to taste and feel the salt on the Pearl Passage Oyster as well - another must when you go.

Have a blast!

u.e.

Edited by ulterior epicure (log)

“Watermelon - it’s a good fruit. You eat, you drink, you wash your face.”

Italian tenor Enrico Caruso (1873-1921)

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I can't wait to try the uni from Maine--I hope they have it when I'm there.  I had always heard and read that the uni from the Californian Coast demanded the highest prices and hence was of the highest quality.  I guess Yasuda believes differently, or did I misunderstand your comments?

I wrote a story once on sea urchin and was surprised that so many great chefs (e.g. Ripert) were using Maine urchin when I'd always heard the West Coast stuff was the best. Then I asked a well-known fan of the West Coast stuff why he thought it was so much better than urchin from the East Coast when all these great chefs were using the latter, and he jokingly said something like, "Can't imagine why those Frenchman love their iodine-y sea urchin."

So I think it's just a matter of taste. West Coast urchin is slightly sweeter and less iodine-y. Maybe Maine urchins taste similar to the urchin caught off the coast of France and remind French chefs of home.

By the way, I once saw uni from Russia on Yasuda's menu!

JJ Goode

Co-author of Serious Barbecue, which is in stores now!

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"For those of you following along, JJ is one of these hummingbird-metabolism types. He weighs something like eleven pounds but he can eat more than me and Jason put together..." -Fat Guy

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I wrote a story once on sea urchin and was surprised that so many great chefs (e.g. Ripert) were using Maine urchin when I'd always heard the West Coast stuff was the best. Then I asked a well-known fan of the West Coast stuff why he thought it was so much better than urchin from the East Coast when all these great chefs were using the latter, and he jokingly said something like, "Can't imagine why those Frenchman love their iodine-y sea urchin."

Yes, the W.C. variety is sweeter and has a more buttery/creamy affect. The E.C. uni was much more briney, or "iodine-y" - my tastebuds remember "roasted garlic" too...

By the way, I once saw uni from Russia on Yasuda's menu!

:shock: That's it! I'm heading straight back there as soon as they get some in! Thanks for the tip jogoode!

u.e.

“Watermelon - it’s a good fruit. You eat, you drink, you wash your face.”

Italian tenor Enrico Caruso (1873-1921)

ulteriorepicure.com

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ulteriorepicure@gmail.com

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I've got reservations for two at Yasuda next week. How bad can I expect the damage to be? I'm not much on drinking, so that helps. I'm coming from Atlanta, where the best place in town (former best place, actually - he just closed down to give NYC a shot - you bastards!) charged between $4-7 for pairs of nigiri. Don't laugh - I have a feeling Soto is going to take NYC by storm. Being that good in such an awkward location (in more ways than one) makes me think that Soto will be ridiculously good now that he has better access to fish.

Sorry for the Soto advertisement, but to my original question...any help?

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i think yasuda is more like $4 for one piece of nigiri (around that) depending on fish...they are also smaller than most places.

i usually don't keep track but if you read further upthread, you'll find a ton of discussion of price...it is very individualized depending on if you drink alcohol, etc.

i find for two people with one order of sake and letting yasuda-san feed us it is around $200+tip+tax

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I've got reservations for two at Yasuda next week.  How bad can I expect the damage to be?  I'm not much on drinking, so that helps.  I'm coming from Atlanta, where the best place in town (former best place, actually - he just closed down to give NYC a shot - you bastards!) charged between $4-7 for pairs of nigiri.  Don't laugh - I have a feeling Soto is going to take NYC by storm.  Being that good in such an awkward location (in more ways than one) makes me think that Soto will be ridiculously good now that he has better access to fish. 

Sorry for the Soto advertisement, but to my original question...any help?

Depends on whether you'll be ordering a la carte off the menu or if you'll be at the bar getting it "omakase"-style from Yasuda himself. If the latter, you can expect to pay anywhere from $100 - $150 p/person for a pretty generous meal (20+ nigiri)... that's without tax, tip, or drinks. If you check my flickr account, you can see my last meal and I think I have the exact price somewhere with that set.

u.e.

“Watermelon - it’s a good fruit. You eat, you drink, you wash your face.”

Italian tenor Enrico Caruso (1873-1921)

ulteriorepicure.com

My flickr account

ulteriorepicure@gmail.com

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Would it safe to say they won't even seat you near Yasuda unless you plan to spend $100+/person?

Wow, NY really skews my price points. Living in San Francisco, which I think is considered an "expensive town to live in" I still don't consider dinners > $30-40/person often. And now, I am considering places for $100/person when I visit NY with my parents. Am I going crazy?

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Would it safe to say they won't even seat you near Yasuda unless you plan to spend $100+/person?
I don't think that's the case. Yasuda can't force you to eat $100+ of food. You can certainly order a la carte at his end of the bar. That being said, it's very easy, once you settle in, just to let yourself (literally) melt into his pliant and talented hands... if ever a $100 meal is justifiable, an experience at Yasuda's bar certainly is well worth it, IMO.
...Am I going crazy?
No, you're just going to NYC!! :wink:

u.e.

“Watermelon - it’s a good fruit. You eat, you drink, you wash your face.”

Italian tenor Enrico Caruso (1873-1921)

ulteriorepicure.com

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ulteriorepicure@gmail.com

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You certainly don't have to spend over $100 per person. Though you likely won't get out for much less if you start experimenting and trying new things out. With that said, eating in front of Yasuda doesn't mean you have to try all the most exotic fish, it simply will guarantee an educational, in-your-face, and very enjoyable sushi experience.

Overall, if you stick to items more or less on the menu and order a assortment of things that you want and he recommends, then it shouldn't be too bad.

Edited by BryanZ (log)
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  • 2 weeks later...

Sushi Cartel New York City Entry #90 Sushi Yasuda

With the discussion of late of how Rev. Moon's Unification Church (through linked companies) controls the world's supply of raw fish, perhaps Americans should stop grousing about the Arab stranglehold on oil, and start glancing nervously towards the mysterious East for its domination over Omega3. Whether this is a source of concern, the articles in Chicago Tribune and elsewhere remind us again, should we need to be reminded, how little we know of the process by which food magically appears.

When we learn - whether fish or foie gras, veal or venison - our nerves are on edge. So much of the good life depends upon a studied obliviousness, of turning our minds from the dirty work that permits us to clean our plate. As is said of legislation and sausage making, surveillance is dangerous for one's digestion. There is a politics everywhere. Discovering how food is brought to the table is enough to turn one's stomach and raise one's voice - and let us not even think about caviar. Ignorance makes dining possible.

Sushi Yasuda depends on our willingness not to think too hard about raw fish and trades on our confidence in Chef Naomichi Yasuda. And that confidence is well-placed. Yasuda is the highest rated Japanese restaurant in Zagat 2006 - the fifth highest overall - higher rated than such notables as Masa, Sugiyama, and Nobu. Yasuda, however, is not among the fifty most popular, suggesting - accurately - that Yasuda is a restaurant for connoisseurs.

Sushi Yasuda is also one of those serene spaces found in corners of New York. Laminated in light wood (perhaps a white oak, though no tree specialist I), it is not a jewel box, but a humidor. (Momofuku seems an off-kilter and microscopic tribute to Yasuda; Yasuda with the air squeezed out). Yasuda is one of the quietest, most civilized, most adult restaurants in New York.

Unfortunately it is not a restaurant that bends over to please. A group of nine chowists attempted to make a reservation and were told that they only take reservations for parties up to six. Fine. Reservations were made for parties of five and four. Many restaurants would have directed us to two tables together or, better, moved them together on our arrival (such would not have been difficult). Instead, we were seated in opposite ends of the restaurant, as if to suggest that we would not be permitted to violate their rules. It seemed unnecessary, especially in a city so devoted to rule-bending. The service was certainly precise, but not as helpful as it might have been, a combination of distance and disdain.

Still, we were there for the fish, which was always fresh and often exceptional, especially once the sushi arrived. None of our three appetizers were memorable. Best was the soft roll with young mackerel and sea bream. These were luscious bites of fish with a texture close to custard, an impressive opener. The flash fried prawns with green tea powder were nicely crunchy, a unique texture, although the taste was not much different from any lightly fried shrimp. Least impressive was a grilled Spanish mackerel, marinated in sweet sauce. Here the sauce did not live up to its billing and the fish the least compelling texture of the night, almost grainy.

After these appetizers, we treated ourselves to a banquet of sushi and maki rolls. Chef Yasuda takes the quality of the fish so seriously that on the sushi/sashimi list he indicates what he recommends from his own list. He is like a server willing to second-guess the kitchen. In general, we obeyed his commands. Our choices included fluke, chum salmon roe, sea urchin (Maine), sea urchin (California), otoro, eel (anago), eel (unagi), peace passage oyster (perhaps from Hiroshima?), arctic char, king salmon, white king salmon, Tasmanian trout, kimedai, monkfish liver, orange clam, and then a few maki rolls, including toro, mitsuba (chervil), and ume (cherry/shiso). With one or two bites, a close reading is not to be had. But the quality was well-pleasing matched by its excellent rice. Perhaps not the most exquisite sushi, especially in contrast with a recent breakfast repast at the Tsukiji fish market in Tokyo, there were few missteps and several brilliant choices. I particularly enjoyed the Godly oyster sushi, the Maine sea urchin, flavored with a bit of sea salt and tasting like foie gras of the waves (and much better than a too creamy California version), a buttery fluke, the eel, and a most interesting, herbal chervil maki. Salmon and char were also at the high end. Less impressive was the toro maki and, as mentioned, the California urchin. At Sushi Yasuda, one must taste one's sushi before even thinking of dipping it. The chef adds what he conceives of as the proper amount of wasabi, and some of the bites had a rare heat. This is not fish and rice, but fish and rice and philosophy and care.

With this my second visit to Sushi Yasuda, I find it a restaurant that is easier to respect than to love. And I do respect it. Perhaps the space cools my ardor, perhaps it is the service, or perhaps it is the maki and starters that sometimes sing and sometimes hum. The fish is exceptional and the chef is a master and, for us, with sake, tax and tip, the meal was well-priced at $90.00. Yet, I remember Sugiyama and Nobu with such fondness than despite my great and true admiration for the work of Chef Yasuda, I am next likely to think of contributing my tithe to the very Rev. Moon across town.

Sushi Yasuda

204 East 43nd Street (at Third Avenue)

Manhattan (Midtown)

212-972-1001

My Webpage: Vealcheeks

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This sentence in gaf's post exactly expresses my recent experience of Yasuda,

"...I find it a restaurant that is easier to respect than to love."

I found the front of the house and the waitresses to be hurried and, to echo gaf once again, distant and almost disdainful (although the last bit is perahaps too harsh). There was little joy to be found anywhere excepting Yasuda himself who was ebullient and gregarious.

We had made our reservations a month in advance and had specifically asked to be seated in front of Yasuda. We called a day prior and confirmed this. When we arrived we were promptly seated--in front of some other chef. Confused at first, I stopped one of the front of the house people to alert them of this, and, misunderstanding us, he pointed to Yasuda san and said, "He is there." Evidently, the person thought I was asking for an identification. Because this transaction took a couple of milliseconds, I didn't have time to correct him before he jetted off, and hence couldn't correct the mistake. At any rate, my wife told me not to pursue it any longer since the chef in front of whom we were seated looked a bit alarmed, and we didn't want to offend him by demanding to be moved. In the end, I don't think our food experience suffered too much (on that below), but it did leave a slightly sour taste in my mouth.

We both ordered omakase. I don't have much too add to what has already been said about the sushi, but I would want to reiterate just how different the rice is from any other place I've ever been. The difference was not so much in terms of taste but in texture. It was quite toothy and starchy, like well done risotto rice. I didn't note a significant difference in taste in terms of sugar or vinegar, although my wife tells me she did. In the end, I'm not sure I prefer this sort of toothiness or not, but it was very interesting, to say the least.

One rather large issue I had with with the sushi we were served was the excessive, I thought, use of salt and lemon juice. I love using fleur de sel, and put it on nearly everything, but to me most of the use of salt here seemed unnecessary and distracting (both in terms of texture--the salt was fairly coarse grained--and taste). By the way, they use, not surprisingly, Japanese sea salt. Our chef barely spoke a word of English so the pursuit to get more detail proved futile. There were uses of salt and lemon where it made tremendous sense. For example, the oyster (which was, incidentally, from Washington and unbelievably good). One outcome of sitting in front of our particular chef (I can't imagine this would happen with Yasuda himelf) was that the rice in the first couple of pieces of sushi broke apart when I tried to pick it up; and when it didn't completly break apart, stray grains of rice would fall down. He seemed to settle down after a bit and this didn't occur again the remainder of the night.

Our selection was pretty much identical to what Ulterior Epicure received, except we ordered some mackeral and geoduck (giant clam). I liked the geoduck alot, and highly recommend it. The first bite tasted like an explosion of the sea, but this immediately gave way to its textural component (think abalone). We did a side by side tasting of the West Coast vs. East Coast uni. The West Coast was preternaturally creamy and rich tasting (my favorite uni ever was in Little Tokyo in LA; it tasted almost overwhelmingly of lavender. Has anyone ever had uni like that before?). The East Coast had more integrity and depth of taste (perhaps u.e.'s description of roasted garlic is accurate). The color difference between the two is unmistakable. As many have noted, the eel is unparalleled. But regarding some of the fish, to be honest, my preference is for a slightly thicker cut than Yasuda offers. In my opinion, the fish is too slight to get a handle on it before it vanishes in one's mouth.

One thing I definitely didn't like about Yasuda is the pacing of the meal and of the restaurant in general. Our meal took exactly 1 hour. For 22 pieces of sushi each, 2 beers and soup, I think one hour is way too fast.

In the end, I would surely go back for the food alone, but my enthusiasm for Sushi Yasuda is much less now than it was a week ago (when I hadn't tried it). Perhaps I will try it during lunch time and see if things will be more leisurely, and hence more to my taste and preference.

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When we arrived we were promptly seated--in front of some other chef.  Confused at first, I stopped one of the front of the house people to alert them of this, and, misunderstanding us, he pointed to Yasuda san and said, "He is there."  Evidently, the person thought I was asking for an identification.  Because this transaction took a couple of milliseconds, I didn't have time to correct him before he jetted off, and hence couldn't correct the mistake.  At any rate, my wife told me not to pursue it any longer since the chef in front of whom we were seated looked a bit alarmed, and we didn't want to offend him by demanding to be moved.  In the end, I don't think our food experience suffered too much (on that below), but it did leave a slightly sour taste in my mouth.

:shock: Gosh... that's really disappointing to hear. Are you sure you emphasized on the phone when you made the reservation that you specifically (and only) wanted to sit at Yasuda's station? :unsure: That's really too bad!

... but I would want to reiterate just how different the rice is from any other place I've ever been.  The difference was not so much in terms of taste but in texture.  It was quite toothy and starchy, like well done risotto rice.  I didn't note a significant difference in taste in terms of sugar or vinegar, although my wife tells me she did.  In the end, I'm not sure I prefer this sort of toothiness or not, but it was very interesting, to say the least.
I love the rice. What I appreciate the most, in addition to the taste and texture, is the temperature... somehow, never too warm and never too cool... just right. :raz:
One rather large issue I had with with the sushi we were served was the excessive, I thought, use of salt and lemon juice.  I love using fleur de sel, and put it on nearly everything, but to me most of the use of salt here seemed unnecessary and distracting (both in terms of texture--the salt was fairly coarse grained--and taste).  By the way, they use, not surprisingly, Japanese sea salt.
I didn't think so... but, then again, I'm a salt fiend... but I think that sea salt and lemon are more thoughtful "condiments" to the fish than soy... which I hardy, if ever, use at Sushi Yasuda. So too with wasabi. I really enjoy the unadulterated flavor of the seafood. I also appreciate the sea salt's cruncy textural interplay with the buttery fish and the wonderful rice.
Our chef barely spoke a word of English so the pursuit to get more detail proved futile.
Althought Yasuda is (somewhat) conversant in English, alas, so of my inquiries were relegated to a nod, a smile and then a non sequetor joke... :laugh:
There were uses of salt and lemon where it made tremendous sense.  For example, the oyster (which was, incidentally,  from Washington and unbelievably good).
Pearl Passage?
One outcome of sitting in front of our particular chef (I can't imagine this would happen with Yasuda himelf) was that the rice in the first couple of pieces of sushi broke apart when I tried to pick it up; and when it didn't completly break apart, stray grains of rice would fall down.  He seemed to settle down after a bit and this didn't occur again the remainder of the night.

That's too bad... that's never happened with me with Yasuda... :sad: But, at least the chef corrected him/herself.

But regarding some of the fish, to be honest, my preference is for a slightly thicker cut than Yasuda offers.  In my opinion, the fish is too slight to get a handle on it before it vanishes in one's mouth.
Yes, I have noticed that Yasuda's cuts are on the thinner side - but for me, I think part of the reason why the fish seemed to "dissolve" away was because the quality of the fish is so high (both in freshness and sometimes fattiness) that the silky meat just melted away...
One thing I definitely didn't like about Yasuda is the pacing of the meal and of the restaurant in general.  Our meal took exactly 1 hour.  For 22 pieces of sushi each, 2 beers and soup, I think one hour is way too fast.

Yes, I would agree that the hour goes way too quickly... however, I didn't find the pacing rushed. In fact, with all the picture-taking, you can only imagine I wasn't exactly rushing through my meal. In fact, remembering my first visit, when I stuffed myself silly very quickly, I deliberately sat back and paced myself through the meal - sometimes leaving one, and couple of times, two or even three nigiri gathering on my banana leaf. Master Yasuda got the hint and slowed down... he's usually pretty good about interacting with the diner's eating capacity.

... but my enthusiasm for Sushi Yasuda is much less now than it was a week ago (when I hadn't tried it).  Perhaps I will try it during lunch time  and see if things will be more leisurely, and hence more to my taste and preference.

That's too bad... based on your sushi-eating experiences/preferences, where would you prefer?

u.e.

“Watermelon - it’s a good fruit. You eat, you drink, you wash your face.”

Italian tenor Enrico Caruso (1873-1921)

ulteriorepicure.com

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ulteriorepicure@gmail.com

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When we arrived we were promptly seated--in front of some other chef.  Confused at first, I stopped one of the front of the house people to alert them of this, and, misunderstanding us, he pointed to Yasuda san and said, "He is there."  Evidently, the person thought I was asking for an identification.  Because this transaction took a couple of milliseconds, I didn't have time to correct him before he jetted off, and hence couldn't correct the mistake.  At any rate, my wife told me not to pursue it any longer since the chef in front of whom we were seated looked a bit alarmed, and we didn't want to offend him by demanding to be moved.  In the end, I don't think our food experience suffered too much (on that below), but it did leave a slightly sour taste in my mouth.

:shock: Gosh... that's really disappointing to hear. Are you sure you emphasized on the phone when you made the reservation that you specifically (and only) wanted to sit at Yasuda's station? :unsure: That's really too bad!

I have to say that, based on my own experience, I don't find this very surprising. No matter how much you emphasize on the phone that you want to be seated at Yasuda's station.

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It would seem that there is too much demand for Yasuda and that they rather tell a few white lies than turn away customers. Like Sneakeater and others, I have had this experience.

I would add that another sushi chef, a certain Yoshi, is quite good. He normally stands at the other end of the bar near the "kitchen" (far left if facing the bar). I have had several delightful meals with him.

Edited by ckkgourmet (log)
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  • 3 months later...

I recently continued my son's College search with a quick visit to NYC. After a very hot afternoon on campus we cooled down and joined our friends Mr. Mrs. JosephB for a refreshing dinner at Sushi Yasuda. I requested the bar with Yasuda when I made our reservation and we got the bar with Yasuda. I did have to alter the date of our trip by one day in order for this to be accomodated, but it actually worked out for the best anyway. We ordered omakase and were treated to an extraordinary meal with great seafood, wonderful rice and delightful cold sake. When all was said and done we were full and cut off the meal after about one hour. While it was quick it in no way felt rushed. We proceeded at our own pace with yasuda serving us and for part of the time another party of three. It is perhaps this focused attention and continuing flow of this very efficient sushi master that makes the meal progress rapidly. In other sushi bars the chef is also accomodating other diners at tables throughout the restaurant thereby prolonging the experience at the bar. Personally, I prefer the individualized attention. Following are photos of our progression.

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A small salad given to us as an amuse. Tasty.

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Yasuda in action.

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Blue fin tuna - medium toro

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Higher fat Blue fin tuna

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Alaskan white king salmon

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King Salmon

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Sawani - Fresh white sea eel with sea salt and lemon. I loved the textural contrast the salt added.

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Copper River Sockeye Salmon

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Yasuda Service

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Shrimp - just cooked and sweet.

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Big-Eye Fatty Tuna

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Uni from Maine on the left and from Siberia on the right.

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A newly vacated table ready for turn-over.

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The fast and sure hands of Yasuda

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Maine Uni

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More Yasuda service

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Russian Uni - I liked the texture and flavor of the Maine uni more though this was noticably different.

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Seaweed Salad. People sitting next to me had ordered this from the kitchen. This was so beautiful we had to try it. It was the one disappointment of the evening, however, as none of the seaweeds had much flavor and I did not particularly enjoy the dressing that accompanied it.

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More tuna and Shimaaji Yellowtail.

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More Yasuda action. Watching the master is half the fun...

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...the other half of the fun is eating and sharing the experience with great dining partners.

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The master at work.

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Anago - fresh dark sea eel.

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I love synchronization. :smile:

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Toro Roll. This was the only roll we had all evening. In other sushi bars I like to see what concoctions they come up with. Here the simplicity is best given the amazing quality of the ingredients used and the care with which they are handles. I do not do additional dipping when dining herre. Yasuda's subtle additions are sufficient for me. Anything more would simply mask the quality.

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Fresh sardine - one of my favorites of the evening.

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Shirayaki - fresh white freshwater eel.

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The view down the bar.

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Sea Scallop.

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Peace Passage Oyster. This wad salt and lemon and the essential brine of the sea - magnificent.

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Artisanal Green Tea Ice Cream made in Staten Island. This was barely sweetened and marvellous - a perfect ending to this wonderful meal. This was my son's first excursion into high-end sushi. I don't think he could have had a better introduction.

This post is dedicated to Matt Hassett R.I.P.

John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

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docsconz.

thanks for the bit of comfort - for those of use not in nyc. it's great to see that naomichi is still going strong - i can't wait to go back!!

1. can you articulate how the siberian uni was different from the maine? i don't believe i've ever tried the former... you know me, i'm'a always "urchin" for some uni!!! :raz:

2. Best of luck to your son on his college search. I bet you're hoping he ends up in NYC so you have one more reason to get some Yasuda-lovin' more fruequently!! :wink:

“Watermelon - it’s a good fruit. You eat, you drink, you wash your face.”

Italian tenor Enrico Caruso (1873-1921)

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docsconz.

thanks for the bit of comfort - for those of use not in nyc.  it's great to see that naomichi is still going strong - i can't wait to go back!! 

1. can you articulate how the siberian uni was different from the maine?  i don't believe i've ever tried the former... you know me, i'm'a always "urchin" for some uni!!! :raz:

2. Best of luck to your son on his college search.  I bet you're hoping he ends up in NYC so you have one more reason to get some Yasuda-lovin' more fruequently!! :wink:

The Siberian uni was not quite as firm as the Maine uni texturally. They tasted different, but at this point I can't quite pin down a good description of the taste of the Russian. I can say that I did enjoy both.

One of the best things about Yasuda is the amazing variety and breadth of his offerings not to mention the quality.

As for the College search...he is only going to be a junior in H.S., but I think an early start to see what is available at top schools and what it will take to get in is good for him. As for the food aspect, unless I will be living there many top College towns have good food :wink: although I certainly wouldn't mind NYC. :laugh: Then again, tuition will be expensive enough. :wacko:

John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

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Great photos, John! Wonderful post. I don't know what everything tasted like or precisely what the textures were, but I certainly get a sense of the variety, Yasuda's mastery, and the enjoyment that all of you had.

Michael aka "Pan"

 

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