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Huitlacoche


guajolote
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Hopleaf asked about my avatar, which is huitlacoche - a fungus which grows on corn. I've had it in soup, and as a stuffing in quesadillas. Does anyone know of any other dishes which it appears in? Can you buy it fresh anywhere in the US?

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I've dying to try it, a friend of mine described itwith these glowing words: "huitlacoche could top a cigarette butt and still be delicious."

I've heard some people in CA (SF or LA?) say you can get it sometimes at their farmers markets.

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Josephina Howard's book Rosa Mexicano, A Culinary Autobiography has a whole chapter on cuitlacoche (her spelling). It includes both recipes (including ice cream!) and some information about suppliers she has used. In one case, a farmer had it growing on his corn, and thought his crop was ruined until she offered to buy it.

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MadVal, Seattle, WA

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I've seen recipes using it in just about anything: any tortilla antojito, crepas, budin, omeletes, soups, rice, rellenos...you name it, anyplace you can use a mushroom.

Some larger cities will have it in their farmer's markets - have you tried the Hispanic markets there?

You can always call Bayless and see where he gets his. :wink:

I also know you can get it canned...if not from a local grocer at least online (under alternate spelling 'Cuitlacoche':

click here for The CMC Company - 'Hard To Find Ingredients for the Serious Cook'

I'd read somewhere that huitlacoche translates roughly as "shit of the gods" from the original Nahuatl...anyone have any insight on that?

...I thought I had an appetite for destruction but all I wanted was a club sandwich.

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We've cooked with the canned variety a few times, using it as an addition to sauces. The one farmer we approached about growing it said that it poses a problem for nearby crops.

We found the canned variety in NYC at the Kitchen Market and in NJ at Intl Food Mart.

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There is a cafe on the Lower East Side which offers it, and I have the guilty feeling I promised Joy the name and address.  I am making a note to look it up later.

Did you try it on a cigarette butt?

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Okay, cheeky, I haven't tried it yet, but did pick up a menu. The hole-in-wall is called the Itzocan Cafe, 438 East 9th between 1st and A (212 677 5856).

They offer huitlacoche in quesadillas, along with mushrooms, corn, poblano peppers and cheese, and also in a sweet corn soufflee cake. They have some other unusual items too - what are epazote dumplings?

Entrees range from $10.50 to $14.50. I can't tell you if the fungi are canned or fresh, and it might be wise to call ahead to see if they're available.

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They offer huitlacoche in quesadillas, along with mushrooms, corn, poblano peppers and cheese, and also in a sweet corn soufflee cake.  They have some other unusual items too - what are epazote dumplings?

Epazote is a common herb used in Mexican cooking. This all sounds very exciting, let us know about your meal.

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Zarela Martinez has a wonderful recipe for a Huitlacoche Soup in her book "Food from My Heart". There is also and interesting sounding recipe for Huitlacoche mousse.

I know she offers the soup in the restaurant from time to time. In my catering days we did a version of the soup as an Hors d' and served it in demi tasse cups finished with a swirl of crema........ :biggrin:

Edited by Nockerl (log)
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  • 2 months later...

They offer huitlacoche in quesadillas, along with mushrooms, corn, poblano peppers and cheese, and also in a sweet corn soufflee cake.  They have some other unusual items too - what are epazote dumplings?

Epazote is a common herb used in Mexican cooking. This all sounds very exciting, let us know about your meal.

Isn't Epazote ground up dried shrimp?

"Always do sober what you said you'd do drunk. That will teach you to keep your mouth shut." -Ernest Hemingway

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They offer huitlacoche in quesadillas, along with mushrooms, corn, poblano peppers and cheese, and also in a sweet corn soufflee cake.  They have some other unusual items too - what are epazote dumplings?

Epazote is a common herb used in Mexican cooking. This all sounds very exciting, let us know about your meal.

Isn't Epazote ground up dried shrimp?

I'm a few steps ahead of you, Hop

Epazote

I don't think I've ever had uncooked huilacoche.

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You can buy huitlacoche on the ears from Henry of "The Farm" at the Evanston's farmer's market when he has them. Usually you need damp, humid weather for it to show up on corn. My favorite way to eat it was to saute it with epazote and garlic and eat it as a taco filling. It shows up at Topolobampo's menu as well. People I know from Iowa thought I was crazy to buy corn full of corn smut...I thought they were crazy to throw it out.

regards,

trillium

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