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Homemade Marshmallows: Recipes & Tips (Part 1)


bripastryguy
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I used Neil's recipe for both "classic" (i.e., vanilla) and strawberry marshmallows. They've been selling like hotcakes at our local farmers' market. We charge $1 for a bag of four. The looks on people's faces when they read our sign are priceless! Usually they glance at it, then glance away, then turn deliberately back to read it more carefully. Their jaws drop and eyes open wide. They walk over to our stand and ask all sorts of questions. Then out comes their dollar and away they go, in fluff heaven. It's very cool to witness.

Making these guys is really simple. It takes less than 15 minutes to get it into the whipping bowl, another 10 to whip. I let them cool/dry for about 24 hours, then cut them on a guitar. They are the goooooiest things I've ever worked with - until you get the sugar/corn starch coating on. But my golly how people love them!

Cheers,

Edited by stscam (log)

Steve Smith

Glacier Country

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Has anybody made marshmallows using agar instead of gelatin? I was thinking of trying this, and wondering what sort of substitution to make.

I have not made them with agar agar, however I have made them with marshmallow root (from my garden), with guar gum from the health food store and with kuzu root.

The first two turned out well but were a lot of work. The kuzu root was not successful.

I was trying to develop a recipe for friends who are vegans and did not want to use gelatin.

I don't see why you couldn't use agar agar, you would probably have to experiment.

considering my experience with agar agar, I would use a little less than the amount of gelatin in the recipe as agar agar has more "setting" power.

This site will give you quite a bit of information.

http://www.vegsoc.org/info/gelling.html

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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Has anybody made marshmallows using agar instead of gelatin? I was thinking of trying this, and wondering what sort of substitution to make.

I have not made them with agar agar, however I have made them with marshmallow root (from my garden), with guar gum from the health food store and with kuzu root.

The first two turned out well but were a lot of work. The kuzu root was not successful.

Addendum:

I began using guar gum years ago to make lakhoum, Turkish Delight, because I liked the stability better than the candy made with gelatin.

My teacher, way back in the 60s, used gum arabic (has to be food grade, can't use the stuff in artist's supply stores) for making jellied candies and for some reason the flavors were much more intense than with any other product. He also used it for making decorations for cakes.

It remains pliable and combined with pulled sugar to support it, can make spectacular decorations. My teacher made a 5-tier wedding cake with a waterfall on one side made with the gum arabic jelled material.

For many years it was very difficult to get superior food grade gum arabic in significant amounts at reasonable prices. (Most came from the Sudan and the tribal warfare nearly destroyed the trade.)

read about it here:http://www.jumbo.th.com/

and here:http://www.bostick-sullivan.com/Technical_papers/gum_arabic.htm

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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nightscotsman, may I ask how much in tablespoons are 4 envelopes gelatin?

I have half a dozen boxes of Diet Kojel - unflavored, unsweetened, sugar free jel dessert - recently arrived courtesy of a kind American friend (she's on the sugar free diet, hence the diet Kojel). Each box has one envelope, 0.3oz in weight. How different/alike is this with the gelatine you use.

On the box, it also states "Kojel, unlike pure gelatine, is a quick setting jel dessert". Is this a problem?

She also sent me some boxes of flavored ones and these are 3oz each. Can these be adapted into your recipe to make flavored marshmallows? These already have the sugar in them, right?

My previous attempt to make marshmallow was a disaster (dense and gritty), so I will try your recipe next (also because I really prefer that it contains no egg whites).

I will have to resort to using agar-agar powder once this Kojel is exhausted due to Halal/Kosher issues (although she said all I have to do is ask :biggrin: ), and I wonder about the proper substitution measurements.

And what about pectin? Is this also a possible substitute?

And I really want to be able to make them because my son loves marshmallows and none of the commercial ones available here are truly Halal/Kosher. He can only enjoy them when friends send over the Kosher ones from the US (although they are really produced in Israel). The 3 packets of Kosher marshmallows sent with these Kojels have long since gone. :biggrin: One of them was covered with toasted coconut - quite yummy. I bet they're better dipped in chocolates!

A lot of questions, I know. So, thanks in advance for any help.

edited to add : Thanks Behemoth and andiesenji for the links. :smile:

Edited by kew (log)
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According the the Kraft Foods web site, 4 packets of Knox Gelatine is 1 oz. So I think you could use 3 packets of your Kojel.

I haven't heard ot Kojel before, so I don't know how it will work. Do you know what it's made of? Any other details on the box?

And stscam: glad the recipe is a hit with your customers. So that royalty check is in the mail, right? :wink::biggrin:

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nightscotsman, thank you for the reply.

I have been trying to get more information on the Net and so far I've found out on one site that mentions 1 envelope gelatine is 1T. I visited the Kraft site but wasn't sure if the envelopes of differing brands are of the same weight.

I will try using 3 envelopes of this Kojel.

The ingredient list is : vegetable gum, adipic acid, tapioca dextrin, calcium phosphate, potassium citrate.

Other things mentioned on the box are - to not to let it dissolve nor soak in cold water but boiling water, to use it immediately, to not add pineapple juice and that kojel cannot be remolded once set.

I tried to find an official homepage but it doesn't have one?

I did ask my friend who sent it but then she doesn't cook much and only make the flavored ones.

I think I'll go explore more vegan sites. Or Jewish cooking sites. Of course, there are marshmallow recipes using kojel but I want to make your marshmallows. :biggrin: Plus the 'vegan' recipe says to soak the Kojel for 1/2hr in cold water which makes me skeptical - looks like it's merely a replacement of the word gelatine with Kojel, and not a true recipe using Kojel.

Thanks for trying to help out more. I just thought Americans would be familiar with it, but then (now it crossed my mind :wacko: ) why would you need it because you can use gelatine, right?

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With all the interest in mycryo these days, and it being advertised as a substitute for gelatine, does anyone have any idea - or experimented - with using mycro instead of gelatine?

Also, for those of us trying this out at home (I may make these plain and then dip them in some fab chocolate for an event I am doing), any replacement ideas for a guitar? Can I refrigerate these, cut them, and let them warm up?

TiA,

Clay

Clay Gordon

president, pureorigin

editor/publisher www.chocophile.com

founder, New World Chocolate Society

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I used a cookie cutter to cut, since I don't have access to a guitar. It does gunk up but if your keep cleaning it off and spraying it with pan coating it works well. I did tulip shaped marshmellows on a stick, a photo of this is posted in my Easter thread.

No need or reason to refridgerate them. They hold for many days if you wrap them well in plastic (even cut ones).

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Neil...I made passionfruit and they were incredible...how did you make the coconut ones...did you just replace the water with coconut milk? I did try a small batch of cocoa ones too -- delicious!

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The looks on people's faces when they read our sign are priceless! Usually they glance at it, then glance away, then turn deliberately back to read it more carefully. Their jaws drop and eyes open wide. They walk over to our stand and ask all sorts of questions. Then out comes their dollar and away they go, in fluff heaven. It's very cool to witness.

Sooooooo, don't stop there... what does your sign say???

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The sign says, simply, "HOMEMADE MARSHMALLOWS." We had another market today, and yet more eyes popped and jaws dropped. People often comment, "I didn't know you could make them at home." And a few others tell us that they've made them for Boy/Girl Scout meetings, church functions, or just for fun.

Due to the popularity of the basic MM we decided to offer S'Mores, too. We make a thinner MM than usual, dip it in some Callebaut 52% semi-sweet, then sandwich that with store-bought grahams. We tell folks that if they want to heat them, they can stick them in the microwave, but under no circumstances should they run it for more than four seconds. If you do - KABLAAM!!! What a mess.

Thanks for the curiosity.

Cheers,

Steve Smith

Glacier Country

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so, is the consensus that agar will or will not work?

and...any thoughts on a slightly more savory application of flavored marshmallows?

I plan to make (nightscotsman's) marshmallows on Monday.

And if that is a success I plan to try using agar-agar powder because eventually I will have to resort to using this. I will post the results.

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With all the interest in mycryo these days, and it being advertised as a substitute for gelatine, does anyone have any idea - or experimented - with using mycro instead of gelatine?

Mycryo will not work for making marshmallows. Being cocoa butter, it's pure fat which will keep the mixture from whipping and holding a foam.

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Neil...I made passionfruit and they were incredible...how did you make the coconut ones...did you just replace the water with coconut milk? I did try a small batch of cocoa ones too -- delicious!

Yep, I just used coconut milk - but I made my own rather than use canned for better flavor. Pour boiling water over shredded, unsweetened coconut and let sit for about half an hour. Spin in a blender or use a stick blender. Strain through a triple layer of cheese cloth, squeezing out as much liquid as possible. You can also toast the coconut before adding water for a toasty flavor.

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Also, for those of us trying this out at home (I may make these plain and then dip them in some fab chocolate for an event I am doing), any replacement ideas for a guitar? Can I refrigerate these, cut them, and let them warm up?

TiA,

Clay

I use a fine monofilament line - bought in the fishing section at Wal-Mart.

Cut a piece long enough with some extra to tie around a couple of bottle corks at each end.

Grasp the corks, stretch the line tight (I have water running in the sink and wet the line under the running water.

I put the taut line on the top then pull to one side while pushing down. This gives a clean cut.

You can also use a steel guitar string, very fine. You still need something to hold onto at each end.

I use this method for cutting lakhoum, taffy, cheeses, etc.

The mono line is very cheap, you can get a lifetime supply for a couple of bucks.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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I tried nightscotsman's marshmallow recipe - vanilla version, and attempted it with Kojel. Kojel is in powdered form and not granules. And 3 packets, though weighs a total of .9oz, measures more than 4t.

First, I thought through the recipe trying to figure out how to adapt it to using Kojel which must be dissolved in boiling water and used immediately.

According to the marshmallow recipe, the gelatine mixture is cold (at room temperature) when the sugar mixture is added to it. I don't know if this is an important process but I was determined to stick as close to the instructions as possible.

Hence, this is what I did.

I boiled the 3C sugar, 3/4C water, 1 1/4C light corn syrup (I use Karo brand) and 1/4 tsalt until it reaches soft ball stage. I used the candy thermometer as well as did the cold water test. The thermometer registered 165 when the soft ball stage was achieved. (When it read 140, the syrup was still very watery and didn't pass the soft ball test in cold water.)

I then quickly added the Kojel to boiling hot water (1/4C - which is the puree portion substituted).

I had 1/2C cold water (added 1t vanila earlier) sitting in the bowl to which I poured the syrup in while whisking at highest setting. At the same time, I had my son help pour in the hot Kojel.

So, there I thought I have the hot syrup hitting cold water and also solve the problem of dissolving Kojel in hot water.

I proceeded to beat on high for about 20mins but nothing! The mixture turned slightly whitish/opaque but not at all what marshmallow looks like. It also tasted rather sourish. I think this is the off-taste of Kojel. Oh maaaan .... and I though there goes the expensive corn syrup down the drain. I continued beating maybe 5 mins more before giving up. It was just a thick runny mixture still.

And then I thought, why not try adding egg whites since the mixture is going to waste anyways.

I then quickly whipped up 3 egg whites in another bowl (the syrup mixture is still continued being whipped at high speed with the stand mixer while I do the eggs on another set of mixer) and then nuked the syrup mixture 1 min on high to rewarm it some and then poured this into the egg whites that has been whipped to soft peak stage.

The mixture then turned white. After beating the heck out of it for about 20 mins, I then poured the now somewhat stiffer 'whatever' into the prepared pan. I think it does look like marshmallow cream (if I remember correctly - I had one jar sent to me last year). After adding the egg whites, the sourish taste seemed toned down some too. The mixture now taste almost marshmallow-y. It doesn't seem very fluffy although the volume has increased.

I wonder what went wrong? Or is it just that Kojel isn't suitable? Or did I adapt the recipe incorrectly?

The measuring cup I used is American standard, so it's not the proportion (our cup here is Uk standard). It cannot be the recipe since it's a T&T. I won't be able to cut/taste it until tomorrow evening.

Any comments?

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Right now in my KitchenAid I have Kashmiri Saffron Marshmallows whipping up. I am thinking of covering them in dark chocolate after I cut them. Thanks for the recipe Neil.

I made marshmallows a while back from the book "Retro Desserts" by Wayne Harley Brachman, and I totally agree that the looks on peoples faces when you tell them the marshmallows are homemade is priceless.

Shannon

my new blog: http://uninvitedleftovers.blogspot.com

"...but I'm good at being uncomfortable, so I can't stop changing all the time...be kind to me, or treat me mean...I'll make the most of it I'm an extraordinary machine."

-Fiona Apple, Extraordinary Machine

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I have been thinking and thinking about my Kosher marshmallows and I think Kojel simply won't work because (1) it is a fast acting gelling agent and (2) once set it you can't do anything to it anymore - it can't be set, melted and re-set like agar or gelatine.

Hence, I think what happened was during the beating time, the Kojel have passed it's setting stage and therefore will not set again. And the result - marshmallows that won't set. It also has a funny slightly sourish taste that even the sugars won't mask.

I will try with agar next.

I realize this isn't useful information to most people as you can all use real gelatine, but I hope this info might be helpful to those who need to make Kosher marshmallows like I do, because I've searched the Net for a recipe that gives correct instructions to use Kojel in making marshmallows but all recipes out there seem like the word gelatine is simply replaced with Kojel or Kosher gelatine.

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I then quickly added the Kojel to boiling hot water (1/4C - which is the puree portion substituted).

Kew -- here is yet another version, it seems that person found success. She let the Kojel sit in room temp water for an hour to dissolve. I would try this recipe myself & report except a) I no longer own an electric mixer and b) don't need that much candy in my life. But maybe worth a shot, if you feel like experimenting. (Yeah, I like to let others do the work and reap the benefits :wink:) Actually, where I've read people have been unhappy with agar it seems like it is because it sets up too hard-- may just be that they put too much agar in there. Also maybe worth a shot...though I would use agar from a reputable health food store -- I've had problems with the packages of agar threads from asian marlkets, they had kind of a musty cardboard taste despite rinsing but that could have just been a quality issue. Well, maybe now that my semester is over I can try to give both versions a shot -- if I can find a mixer to borrow. Would a hand mixer have enough power?

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Would a hand mixer have enough power?

You certainly can make marshmallows with a hand mixer. The issue isn't power, but whether you have the stamina to hold the mixer while you beat for up to 10 minutes. Your arm may feel like it's going to fall off.

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Behemoth - thanks for the link! I will have to try to get my hands on this brand of Kosher gelatine. I don't think Kojel is workable in marshmallow recipes.

I have bought 3 envelopes agar-agar powder and thought I'd reduce the portion as it is indeed a strong gelling agent. Using the strips would even be trickier to estimate the quantity. But I'd go with full power first ie using 3 envelopes of 0.3oz agar-agar powder.

TP - Konyaku powder might work - good idea since the Konyaku jelly is softer i.e. more like gelatine. But I thought I'd try agar-agar powder first (not exactly cheap, this, eh?) Besides, when I was at Tesco the other day they don't have unflavored Konyaku powder. I am also going to Carrefour to see if they have Davis gelatine (from Australia) - this is certified Halal by the Australian Islamic Board. Carrefour used to sell this once. Wilton sells re-packed gelatine and told me they are Halal but when I requested the actual list of ingredients as on the original package, it listed beef gelatine .... the lady said ... "well, halal whaaaat? no pork meh? only beef". Nona products mostly carry the Halal logo but it is conspicuously missing from it's gelatine packaging - so I dare not buy.

Anyways ... I hope to try out with the agar-agar powder tomorrow. :smile:

Edited by kew (log)
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OK......I'm thinking along the lines of Chocolate Marshmallows. Have you ever done that, Neil? Would it be reasonable to substitute 1/2 cup of melted chocolate for the Strawberry puree? Or am I crazed and not thinking properly??

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OK......I'm thinking along the lines of Chocolate Marshmallows. Have you ever done that, Neil? Would it be reasonable to substitute 1/2 cup of melted chocolate for the Strawberry puree? Or am I crazed and not thinking properly??

Melted chocolate won't work since the fat will keep the mixture from whipping. However, I've made them successfully with cocoa. I used 1/2 cup of cocoa, 3/4 cup water and a teaspoon of vanilla in place of the puree and water in the recipe. The mashmallows tasted almost fudgy.

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