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Homemade Marshmallows: Recipes & Tips (Part 1)


bripastryguy
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Sorry to post twice in a row, but I had another question.  I just got back from the store and couldn't find potato starch (for coating the marshmallows) anywhere.  Would it be somewhere other than the baking aisle?  Could it be under a different name?  If  can't find it, can I use something else?

The grocery stores around me keep the potato starch not in the baking section but in the Kosher section. Manischewitz brand. Try that!

...wine can of their wits the wise beguile, make the sage frolic, and the serious smile. --Alexander Pope

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  • 2 weeks later...

So, I made the honey-thyme marshmallows 2 days ago and they are really nice. I made an infusion of dried thyme from the last of the herb garden and got a beautiful light green color that I hoped would color the marshmallow, no such luck. I used 1 1\2 cups of a dark honey, given to us by a friend who keeps bees, and 1 1\2 cups sugar. I decreased the water to 1\2 cup. The marshmallow whipped up higher than normal. I did notice that this batch stuck to the foil, whereas the others have not. I wonder if the honey was responsible?

The taste of these marshmallows was wonderful. You get the honey immediately and then, underneath, a delicate hint of thyme. Then the taste of honey comes back to finish with a nougat aftertaste. These and the Raspberry-Chambord have been our favorites so far. Next, tarragon?

If only Jack Nicholson could have narrated my dinner, it would have been perfect.

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Anybody got any ideas? Used raspberry puree to make these and they came out great. Cut them in heart shape. i thought it would be cute if you could make them into conversation hearts , but i don't know how you would put the phrases on?!! :blink:

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sarah o,

Welcome to eGullet! How big are your hearts? I'm not a pro so don't have access to the great tools but I think an icing pen might work and they aren't all that hard to find. What a good idea!

If only Jack Nicholson could have narrated my dinner, it would have been perfect.

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sarah o,

Welcome to eGullet!  How big are your hearts?  I'm not a pro so don't have access to the great tools but I think an icing pen might work and they aren't all that hard to find.  What a good idea!

Thanks, i am not sure what an icing pen is. is it the same as the wilton color markers? i tried those and the tips aren't fine enough.

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You could probably pipe royal icing on top of each one since you're not adding any fat based product and it can stay at room temperature as the marshmallows do. Use a very fine tip and icing that is of writing consistency, color it and give it a go....

Josette

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You could probably pipe royal icing on top of each one since you're not adding any fat based product and it can stay at room temperature as the marshmallows do.  Use a very fine tip and icing that is of writing consistency, color it and give it a go....

Good idea, thanks Josette!

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I just finished making some really nice looking pink colored marshmallows. The bad part is that they taste terrible. :sad: I used cherry oil flavoring, just like you use for making lollipops. Maybe I used too much flavoring or maybe it is the wrong stuff to use for marshmallows.

Whatever the case, they have a funny aftertaste and the entire batch is going in the trash. Such a bummer. My 8 year old daughter didn't even like 'em.

Next step is to try Nightscotsman's recipe with fruit puree.

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Here you go:

4 envelopes gelatin

1/2 c strawberry puree (frozen is actually better than fresh unless you have access to very flavorful local strawberries)

1-1/4 c water

3 c sugar

1-1/4 c light corn syrup

1/4 tsp salt

1/4 tsp orange flower water (optional)

powdered sugar and potato starch for dusting

Line a sheet pan with a 1" rim with aluminum foil. coat the foil with vegetable oil or non-stick spray. Fit the mixer with the whisk attachment.

Mix the strawberry puree, orange flower water (if using) and 1/2 cup of the water in the bowl of a stand mixer and sprinkle the gelatin over to soften.

Put the sugar, corn syrup, remaining 3/4 cup water and salt in a heavy saucepan. Bring to a boil and cook until it reaches the soft-ball stage (234-240 F).

With the mixer at full speed, pour all of the hot syrup slowly down the side of the bowl. Be careful as the mixture is very liquid and hot at this point and some may splash out of the bowl - use a splash guard if you have one. whip until the mixture is very fluffy and stiff, about 8-10 minutes. pour mixture into the foil-lined pan and smooth with an oiled offset spatula so that it's level with the top of the rim (it won't completely fill the pan). Allow the mixture to sit, uncovered at room temp for 10 to 12 hours.

Mix equal parts powdered sugar and potato starch and sift generously over the rested marshmallow slab. Turn it out onto a cutting board or counter, peel off foil and dust with more sugar/starch mixture. Slice with a thin-bladed oiled knife or oiled cookie cutters. Dip all cut edges in sugar/starch mixture and shake off excess. Marshmallows will keep several weeks at room temp in an air-tight container.

Variation - Chocolate Marshmallows:

Replace strawberry puree and initial 1/2 cup of water in mixing bowl with 1/2 cup of cocoa disolved in 1/2 cup boiling water in a separate bowl. Soften gelatine in an additional 1/4 cup cold water in mixing bowl. Add cocoa mixture to mixing bowl and procede with recipe as above. This will produce a marshmallow with a strong chocolate flavor, but somewhat denser than the strawberry version. To get a lighter texture as well as a lighter chocolate flavor, reduce cocoa to 1/4 cup.

Variation - Vanilla Marshmallows:

Replace strawberry puree and initial 1/2 cup of water in mixing bowl with 3/4 cup water and 2 teaspoons of vanilla extract or the seeds scraped from 2 vanilla beans.

"If you hear a voice within you say 'you cannot paint,' then by all means paint, and that voice will be silenced" - Vincent Van Gogh
 

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Nightscotsman's strawberry marshmallow recipe is a winner. Lighter and fluffier than the other marshmallows I've made. The strawberry puree is easy... just a food processor and some frozen strawberries. The clean strawberry taste is amazing.

Here are photos of my handiwork. They were a hit in the office today.

Marshmallows on the counter:

gallery_26333_779_28576.jpg

Bagged up and tied with a ribbon. Happy Valentine's Day!!

gallery_26333_779_47508.jpg

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Very nice Gary! You did a great job! I bet your co-workers were impressed!

Last night I did up bags of 4 in cinnamon and vanilla (separately of course), tied them up with raffia and put them in a basket to sell at the coffee shop I bake for. The owner has priced them at $3.95/bag for the "cinnamon hearts" and $3.25 for vanilla and they are selling. (that's in Canadian dollars) It seems like a lot of money to me but what the heck?! If they keep selling well I'm going to make Creme de Menthe ones for St. Patricks day. Mmmmmm...

Don't wait for extraordinary opportunities. Seize common occasions and make them great. Orison Swett Marden

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I've never used gelatin in a recipe before?  How much is 4 packets (how many ounces/cups/tablespooons)?  What are some good brands?  Is it available at most grocery stores?  Thanks!

Knox brand gelatin is available at most grocery stores. Look for it near the Jello display or in the baking area. Knox sells four packets in a small box. Don't know the exact weight/measurement but think it's a bit over 2 teaspoons per pack.

You gotta make these strawberry marshmallows. You'll be hooked.

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I made the strawberry marshmallows for a baby shower and also for my daughter (7th grade) to take to scool for Valentine's. The adults who tried them at the shower thought they were OK (there were more tempting desserts, like my "signature" cherry-raspberry pie). The 12 and 13 year-olds gave them a unanimous thumbs down :sad: . My daughter loved the vanilla ones I made before, and said that even the cinammon ones were better than strawberry.

Has anyone else had this kid vs adult reaction to the strawberry marshmallows?

I made a batch for my office, but now I'm reluctant to take them.

I'm not a good judge because I only like marshmallows in something else, like hot chocolate.

And one more question, what's the best thing to do with them (besides melted in hot chocolate)?

Thanks

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I was interested in making my own marshmallows and I figured I would ask my eGullet compatriots....eh?

The December 2004 issue of Martha Stewart Living has a recipe for marshmallows (peppermint with red food coloring swirls). could probably get the recipe off her website.

Fairly easy recipe. Delicious marshmallows eaten out of hand or in a cup of hot chocolate. Would definitely make tham again but with the following changes. Use a bigger pan. I forget what size the recipe called for, but I would use a much larger pan so the marshmallows aren't so tall. Also, I would omit the food coloring next time as it was difficult to get the swirls of color throughout the entire marshmallow. Finally, when you cut the marshmallows, have a plate of confectioners sugar to roll them in so they don't stick to the platter or whatever you put them on. If you are a Martha-hater, just try and forget that the recipe came out of her magazine. good marshmallows.

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I made the strawberry marshmallows for a baby shower and also for my daughter (7th grade) to take to scool for Valentine's.  The adults who tried them at the shower thought they were OK (there were more tempting desserts, like my "signature" cherry-raspberry pie).  The 12 and 13 year-olds gave them a unanimous thumbs down :sad:  . My daughter loved the vanilla ones I made before, and said that even the cinammon ones were better than strawberry.

Has anyone else had this kid vs adult reaction to the strawberry marshmallows?

I tried the strawberry, chocolate and vanilla variations, and I liked strawberry the best by far.

"If you hear a voice within you say 'you cannot paint,' then by all means paint, and that voice will be silenced" - Vincent Van Gogh
 

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And one more question, what's the best thing to do with them (besides melted in hot chocolate)?

I like them best in hot chocolate but a friend of mine loves to buy vanilla ones with the edges rolled in toasted coconut. She says they're awesome just to snack on. I haven't tried this yet but it sounds great. Also, and I think this is mentioned earlier in this thread but they make great S'mores.

Don't wait for extraordinary opportunities. Seize common occasions and make them great. Orison Swett Marden

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Most supermarkets carry Knox gelatine (it will be in the baking aisle with the other Jello products). It's unflavored. I believe that all packets are either 2 1/2 or 2 1/4 tsp. by volume, and you usually get about 4 packets to a box.

"I just hate health food"--Julia Child

Jennifer Garner

buttercream pastries

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I just went thru the thread and didn't see LorAnn flavoring oils mentioned. Can anyone suggest as to how much should I add this? First time using Loran - just got them from the US. :biggrin:

And Neil ... again, thank you so much for the recipe coz I'm selling quite a bit of them marshmallows. I now make 9lb blocks and then cut them up (they're such a pain to cut though - wish there's a better way) They're a favorite party treat which I usually sell as a package along with the birthday cake and chocolate suckers.

You can see some pics in my marshamallow album

I've not had much success using cocoa powder though. They go rancid in about a week. :wacko:

Anyways ... back to the LorAnnn oil question ... I would appreciate the help. I have 2 flavors here - watermelon and keoke coffee. TIA.

Edited by kew (log)
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Awesome pictures Kew! Your marshmallows look amazing. What size of pan are you using and how many recipes per pan?...if you don't mind me asking. If you do, that's ok. :)

Don't wait for extraordinary opportunities. Seize common occasions and make them great. Orison Swett Marden

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Awesome pictures Kew! Your marshmallows look amazing. What size of pan are you using and how many recipes per pan?...if you don't mind me asking. If you do, that's ok. :)

Of course, I don't mind the questions. After all I learnt how to make them from eGullet!

I use a plastic container that has straight sides measuring about 14" X 20" X 3.5".

I do not layer it with foil nor use oil. I just rub the sides with potato starch and for the bottom, I cover it with a generous layer of potato starch. I use a small sieve to help distribute the potato starch more evenly - has to be careful coz you don't want uneven surface.

Each recipe/batch makes one layer. The time taken to make a batch is just perfect for the previous layer to just begin to set. Any quicker and it will result in uneven layers (see my early photo of my colored marshmallow)... so, that's 4 batches for 4 layers. I sometimes make up to 5 layers. But more than that, when you cut it won't be nice - it skews too much.

When set, I generously rub the surface with potato starch (it feels so good :raz::laugh: ) and then I use a hot but dried knife, dipped in potato starch to cut around the sides and then turn it over on a big waxed paper covered with more potato starch. It will come out nicely. I then proceed to measure and mark and cut accordingly.

I find that using no oil or confectioner's sugar is best.

I also sell them covered with chocolate, rolled in toasted coconuts and nuts and other jimmies/sprinkles. But I sell the plain or chocolate covered ones the most. Sometimes, I flavor the colored portions according to customer's request.

Now, me wanna make some flavored ones with the LorAnn oils - with flavors that are not common here. :biggrin:

Edited by kew (log)
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