Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Sign in to follow this  
Akiko

Furikake

Recommended Posts

I love canned fish and keep a huge stockpile, so I just went and checked and I have two cans of mackerel. One is 160g and the other is 190g, and I think that's typical. So I think you can go ahead and use your one big can for the recipe, maybe adjusting the seasonings a little.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm interested in trying Hiroyuki's "magic furikake," but I have a question about the recipe: where it says "3 cans of mackerel," how big are the cans? The only canned mackerel I can get around here is 425g per can, so three of those would make a lot of furikake! Can someone help?

I can't believe I missed this question of mkayahara!

In Japan, one "saba no mizuni" can contains about 180-200 g simmered mackerel.

(The content has become lower. It was 210 to 220 g years ago, if I remember correctly.)

Here is the most recent post about my magic furikake.

Sorry for a very late reply and many thanks to smallworld for answering first!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you both, smallworld and Hiroyuki! I'm looking forward to making this. Now I just have to go and buy some sesame seeds.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The furikake and popcorn craze has hit Los Angeles in a big way - example Roy Choi's version at A-Frame. Also recently some co-workers were swooning over a bowl of Hurricane popcorn of which I got not a single kernel. In an attempt to join the party I purchased this Ebi Fumi Furikake and am set to experiment.

010.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I love furikake, but have only eaten it on rice. I had a small container of it in my lunch box (a Mrs. Bento) one day when I was unpacking it to wash it and my husband grabbed it. "What's THIS!?" he demanded. I about laughed myself silly after he told me he thought it was weed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/14/2008 at 1:27 PM, MoGa said:

I've made Hiroyuki's magic furikake a few times now and heartily recommend it (it's become a refrigerator staple).

Success with this recipe led me to overcome my distaste for canned salmon and try making salmon flakes this way (instead of with fresh salted salmon).

I'm still in the experimental stage, but so far the results have been positive.

I drained 2 x 210g cans of pink salmon and turned the fish out onto a frying pan (no oil) on a moderate/low heat setting. Using a spatula I flaked the fish and stirred it periodically until the flakes dried out a little (5-10 minutes). Then I mixed 4 tablespoons of light soy sauce, 3 tablespoons of mirin* and 2 tablespoons of sake and added this to the fish, stirring quickly to incorporate it. Then I continued stirring until the flakes dried out further (I imagine that the drier the flakes, the longer they will last). The main challenge is allowing the fish to dry out without letting it colour or burn. Finally, I added a dribble of sesame oil and mixed this in before setting aside to cool.

I'm almost sad to report that my husband preferred these salmon flakes to the ones I've made with fresh salmon (he suspects the prolonged soak in brine makes them tastier)... at least it's cheaper this way and we'll never need to buy more jars of pre-made salmon flakes (currently about 6GBP/$12 for 300g in London)

The first thing I did with the resulting canned salmon 'furikake' was to mash a couple of umeboshi plums and mix this with some of the salmon flake furikake - it made delicious onigiri, but the flakes don't clump in the way that bonito shavings do when mixed with ume, so ume-blended salmon flakes make very tasty furikake in their own right.

This morning, I folded some into an omelet. Also very good.

Thank you again, Hiroyuki . I would never have considered the possibility of making this at all if I hadn't tried your recipe first.

----

* I'll try adding another spoon of mirin next time to better approximate the golden 1:1 mirin:soy sauce ratio.

 

 

I want to make my own furikake.

 

I'm just reading this recipe and variations of it.

 

Does the fish actually completely dry out with this method? Does it resemble ikan billis/other dried fish? I have some whitebait in my fridge and was considering turning that into furikake, was just wondering how to get it super dried out and crispy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I always imagined Hiroyuki's as not crisp. Someting to be made for us ithi a few days.  I am used to the shaker jars or packets where it is a dry seasoning sprinkle. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×