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Akiko

Furikake

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Might someone have a recipe for a shiso furikake? I can get shiso leaves easily here.

Thanks-

Linda

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Might someone have a recipe for a shiso furikake?  I can get shiso leaves easily here. 

Thanks-

Linda

Shiso (red shiso) furikake, often called Yukari (product name), is usually a byproduct of umeboshi making.

You just dry the shiso leaves used to color ume and then crush them fine with a mortar and pestle or in a food processor

http://www.yamaguchi-farm.com/yukari/01.html

(Sorry, Japanese only)

I found a webpage that describes how to make Yukari from fresh shiso leaves, but it requires ume zu (plum vinegar).

http://www.kanazawa-city.ed.jp/nagasakadai...siso_ryouri.htm

(Sorry, Japanese only again)

You wash shiso leaves, soak them in salt water, rub them with salt, and soak them in umezu. Then, dry them in the sun and crush them fine.

I wonder if you can get ume zu...

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I have a dehydrator, and, I don't have one of those lovely grinding bowls, but I've got a mortar and pestle. Are there any additions that might be traditional?Sesame? Salt? Nori?

Thanks-

Linda

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I have a dehydrator, and, I don't have one of those lovely grinding bowls, but I've got a mortar and pestle.  Are there any additions that might be traditional?Sesame?  Salt?  Nori?

Thanks-

Linda

I think sesame seeds and a bit of salt would be a nice addition...


<p><strong>Kristin Wagner</strong>, aka "torakris"

Manager, Membership

<a class="bbc_email" href="mailto:kwagner@egstaff.org" title="E-mail Link">kwagner@egstaff.org</a></p>

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The commercial product, Yukari, contains red shiso, salt, sugar, seasonings (amino acids, etc.), and malic acid according to its label.

I remember I made shiso furikake only one from the shiso leaves used to make umeboshi that my mother had sent me. They were already dried, so I just put them in an I-wrap bag and crush them by hand and added some salt. The resulting furikake was not as flavorful as the commercial one, but my son, who was three or four years old at that time, liked it.

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Shoyu flavored sesame seeds. These amounts might not work for the hulled type of sesame seed - I used unhulled seeds.

1 cup seeds, toasted or plain. 2 tab soy sauce (If you use an American cup, you might want about another tsp of soy sauce, but the amount you use will depend on how much you like anyway.

First, if the sesame seed is raw, toast over fairly low heat in a dry, heavy pan, shaking the pan as you go. If you have a mesh splatter-cover, it helps prevent seeds from flying everywhere. Once they start popping, they're done, so sprinkle over about a teaspoon of soy sauce, keeping the heat down low, and continue to agitate until dry (you may get flakes or clumps of sauce, but they will disappear). Continue adding soy a little at a time and stirring till dry and brown. Pour out of the pan to cool, pack when completely cold.

To use as furikake, make sure the soy sauce taste is quite pronounced - use the full amount of soy. For a snack to eat out of hand, you might like to reduce the soy sauce by about 15-30%.

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I have one kid who like to eat it plain, and would "drink" the stuff if I let him.

Me too. It's a lot less salty than salt so definitely drinkable.

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Shoyu flavored sesame seeds. These amounts might not work for the hulled type of sesame seed - I used unhulled seeds.

1 cup seeds, toasted or plain. 2 tab soy sauce (If you use an American cup, you might want about another tsp of soy sauce, but the amount you use will depend on how much you like anyway.

First, if the sesame seed is raw, toast over fairly low heat in a dry, heavy pan, shaking the pan as you go. If you have a mesh splatter-cover, it helps prevent seeds from flying everywhere. Once they start popping, they're done, so sprinkle over about a teaspoon of soy sauce, keeping the heat down low, and continue to agitate until dry (you may get flakes or clumps of sauce, but they will disappear). Continue adding soy a little at a time and stirring till dry and brown. Pour out of the pan to cool, pack when completely cold.

To use as furikake, make sure the soy sauce taste is quite pronounced - use the full amount of soy. For a snack to eat out of hand, you might like to reduce the soy sauce by about 15-30%.

Helen, how long do you think these would keep?

My MIL often buys the flavored sesame seeds in the plastic jar and I have always found them to be pretty flavorless. I guess I could make my own...


<p><strong>Kristin Wagner</strong>, aka "torakris"

Manager, Membership

<a class="bbc_email" href="mailto:kwagner@egstaff.org" title="E-mail Link">kwagner@egstaff.org</a></p>

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Aka jiso (red perilla leaf) furikake

1. Sprinkle it on rice.

2. Mix it into rice to make onigiri (rice balls).

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Hiroyuki,

could you give a little more information about that homemade version?

Sure, with pleasure! I don't know how to write a recipe in a proper way, though.

My version is also a wet version. But it lasts for ten days or longer. (Put it in the refrigerator, of course.)

***Maho no furikake (magic furikake) ***

(Sounds silly?)

Ingredients:

1. Mackerel can, boiled plain (mizuni): 3 (not shown in the photo)

2. Soy source: 6 tablespoons. (I don't have a measuring spoon. Just the large spoon in the picture.)

3. Mirin-fu seasoner: 6 tablespoons (same volume as soy source) (I don't use hon mirin. Mirin-fu is enough for me.)

4. Pepper

5. Sesame seeds

How to make:

0. Measure and mix soy source and mirin in a container.

1. Open the 3 cans, drain, and put the mackerel into the nonstick frying pan.

2. Add pepper and sesame seeds. (I can't say how much; just as much as you like).

3. Put the pan on the stove, turn on the gas, and smash the mackerel. (I use a bamboo spatula. See photo) Continue to smash until the mackerel nearly dries out (but still wet). This will take about 5 minutes or so.

4. Put the mix of soy source and mirin, and mix well until nearly dry (but still wet). This will take about 2 minutes or so.

And the result is this:

Whenever I have little appetite, a munch or two of rice with this furikake makes me work up my appetite in no time. It's true. That's why I call it maho no furikake, or magic furikake. It has the same effect on my wife and children, too.

(Sorry, I don't know how to insert photos. Maybe next time...)

While organizing my kitchen I came across a couple cans of water packed mackerel I had bought quite a while back to make this.

I finally made it yesterday! It was wonderful, my kid's really loved it. They had it for dinner last night and breakfast this morning. :biggrin:


<p><strong>Kristin Wagner</strong>, aka "torakris"

Manager, Membership

<a class="bbc_email" href="mailto:kwagner@egstaff.org" title="E-mail Link">kwagner@egstaff.org</a></p>

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Thanks for trying my recipe, Kris. I've had a terrible flu recently and lost 3 kg in 3 days. I'm still recuperating. I know I'm going to need that furikake, and made it this morning.

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Thanks for trying my recipe, Kris.  I've had a terrible flu recently and lost 3 kg in 3 days.  I'm still recuperating.  I know I'm going to need that furikake, and made it this morning.

I am sorry to hear that you caught the flu! It was really going around late here this year as well.


<p><strong>Kristin Wagner</strong>, aka "torakris"

Manager, Membership

<a class="bbc_email" href="mailto:kwagner@egstaff.org" title="E-mail Link">kwagner@egstaff.org</a></p>

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I've been meaning to make Hiroyuki's magic furikake for ages and finally did this afternoon. It was only a moment's work to make and was quite tasty.

Thanks, Hiroyuki!

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I've been meaning to make Hiroyuki's magic furikake for ages and finally did this afternoon. It was only a moment's work to make and was quite tasty.

Thanks, Hiroyuki!

Thank you, Dianabanana! :biggrin: Did you have it with rice? As I said in my foodblog, it's also good on Japanese pizza! Put some furikake, some additional sesame seeds, and cheese on pizza (no tomato sauce). When the pizza is done, sprinkle some bonito flakes (and some soy sauce).

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I've been meaning to make Hiroyuki's magic furikake for ages and finally did this afternoon. It was only a moment's work to make and was quite tasty.

Thanks, Hiroyuki!

Thank you, Dianabanana! :biggrin: Did you have it with rice?

I've also made this and can say it's been a big success (I've now made it with mackeral and I've also tried it with canned tuna, which was also delicious).

Perfect for lunch (with rice of course) and as a late night snack. We love it! thank you so much!

---

Alternative use for Yukari Furikake (shiso gohan)

This is the powdered perilla/beafsteak plant leaves - ingredients are usually red shiso, salt, sugar, amino and malic acids.

Add a tablespoon to 2-4 whole pickled beetroots and mash beetroots with fork. Leave for 5-10 minutes and combine beetroot pulp with your choice of - mayonnaise, creme fraiche/sour cream, yoghurt, thick cream (we generally like a combination of mayonnaise and creme fraiche or yoghurt - or just leave out the dairy products entirely). Delicious with new potatoes, salmon and salad.

Ideally, I make this with one or two ume mashed in with the beetroot, but this isn't necessary. I came up with the shiso powder and beetroot combination after running out of ume, and both my parents as well as my husband enjoyed it. It's now a favourite fish and salad dressing.

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I've been meaning to make Hiroyuki's magic furikake for ages and finally did this afternoon. It was only a moment's work to make and was quite tasty.

Thanks, Hiroyuki!

Thank you, Dianabanana! :biggrin: Did you have it with rice?

I've also made this and can say it's been a big success (I've now made it with mackeral and I've also tried it with canned tuna, which was also delicious).

Perfect for lunch (with rice of course) and as a late night snack. We love it! thank you so much!

---

Alternative use for Yukari Furikake (shiso gohan)

This is the powdered perilla/beafsteak plant leaves - ingredients are usually red shiso, salt, sugar, amino and malic acids.

Add a tablespoon to 2-4 whole pickled beetroots and mash beetroots with fork. Leave for 5-10 minutes and combine beetroot pulp with your choice of - mayonnaise, creme fraiche/sour cream, yoghurt, thick cream (we generally like a combination of mayonnaise and creme fraiche or yoghurt - or just leave out the dairy products entirely). Delicious with new potatoes, salmon and salad.

Ideally, I make this with one or two ume mashed in with the beetroot, but this isn't necessary. I came up with the shiso powder and beetroot combination after running out of ume, and both my parents as well as my husband enjoyed it. It's now a favourite fish and salad dressing.

Thank you, MoGa! Do post a photo of your use of Yukari! It's impossible for me to imagine what the whole pickled beetroots and mash beetroots are... :huh:

As for my furikake, do you use mirin or sugar?

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As for my furikake, do you use mirin or sugar?

Mirin (I always keep a big bottle in the fridge)

I'll try and post a photo in the next couple of weeks - it's a very pretty pink. (I'll PM you when I've posted it).

I made another batch of the mackerel 'magic' furikake today. MrMoGa's lunch tomorrow will be the magic furikake with rice, Saturday's salted cabbage (kabetsu shio zuke - salt, konbu & mirin) and shoyu marinaded garlic cloves (ninniku shoyu zuke - store bought).

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MoGa,

Your mentioning a non-traditional substitute in the form of pickled beets, and red perilla reminded me of something that may have a somewhat japanese application. It does not fit in anywhere except salad dressings and I thought I might as well include it here.

I see bags of perilla seed in Korean groceries and wonder what they go into? In the Indian Himalayas, these seeds are toasted just so and ground up as you do sesame in a suribachi. Boiled sliced potatoes are dressed with this paste to which roasted ground sesame may also be added.

From that point on, your taste takes over. In the Himalayan context, crushed garlic, and a thick syrup that is quite sour made by boiling down the very juicy wild lemon, Citrus jambhiri, is added. Finely chopped green chilies, or chillies crushed in the suribachi to release their rind oils may also follow. Salt, of course. Any other alliums you may fancy, e.g. a soupcon of diced onion, but not necessary. The potatoes should be dressed when they are very hot, to absorb the sourness, and then let sit.

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MoGa,

Your mentioning a non-traditional substitute in the form of pickled beets, and red perilla reminded me of something that may have a somewhat japanese application. It does not fit in anywhere except salad dressings and I thought I might as well include it here.

I see bags of perilla seed in Korean groceries and wonder what they go into? In the Indian Himalayas, these seeds are toasted just so and ground up as you do sesame in a suribachi. Boiled sliced potatoes are dressed with this paste to which roasted ground sesame may also be added.

From that point on, your taste takes over. In the Himalayan context, crushed garlic, and a thick syrup that is quite sour made by boiling down the very juicy wild lemon, Citrus jambhiri, is added. Finely chopped green chilies, or chillies crushed in the suribachi to release their rind oils may also follow. Salt, of course. Any other alliums you may fancy, e.g. a soupcon of diced onion, but not necessary. The potatoes should be dressed when they are very hot, to absorb the sourness, and then let sit.

I've not seen bags of perilla seed (but you've spurred me to look a lot harder!) in London, but your descriptions sound wonderful - there's obviously lots of room for experimentation.

The furikake I metioned is made from the dried leaf of the perilla (if you ever buy ume boshi plums you can make your own yukari seasoning by drying out and crumbling the red leaves that usually coat the umeboshi).

I don't know how the Koreans use perilla seeds, but in Japan they are often used in pickles.

I believe they are called shisonomi

shisonomi.jpg

I've also had them served to me still attached to the stalk, you use your chopsticks to strip them from the stalk and the seeds will season a small bowl of soy sauce

Pictures here: http://hachi.fool.jp/cooking/11_shisonomi/index.php

I'd love to get hold of some to use in my own pickles. If I do find them, I'll be asking you more questions. Those suggestions you made have really made my mouth water!

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i testify that this recipe is simple and tasty.  it lives up to its name...  thanks for sharing!

Thank you for trying my recipe, melonpan. This furikake is one of my favorite breakfast okazu (side dishes). Why don't you modify my recipe to suit your Korean taste and post it here?

I always keep the furikake in the refrigerator:

I've made Hiroyuki's magic furikake a few times now and heartily recommend it (it's become a refrigerator staple).

Success with this recipe led me to overcome my distaste for canned salmon and try making salmon flakes this way (instead of with fresh salted salmon).

I'm still in the experimental stage, but so far the results have been positive.

I drained 2 x 210g cans of pink salmon and turned the fish out onto a frying pan (no oil) on a moderate/low heat setting. Using a spatula I flaked the fish and stirred it periodically until the flakes dried out a little (5-10 minutes). Then I mixed 4 tablespoons of light soy sauce, 3 tablespoons of mirin* and 2 tablespoons of sake and added this to the fish, stirring quickly to incorporate it. Then I continued stirring until the flakes dried out further (I imagine that the drier the flakes, the longer they will last). The main challenge is allowing the fish to dry out without letting it colour or burn. Finally, I added a dribble of sesame oil and mixed this in before setting aside to cool.

I'm almost sad to report that my husband preferred these salmon flakes to the ones I've made with fresh salmon (he suspects the prolonged soak in brine makes them tastier)... at least it's cheaper this way and we'll never need to buy more jars of pre-made salmon flakes (currently about 6GBP/$12 for 300g in London)

The first thing I did with the resulting canned salmon 'furikake' was to mash a couple of umeboshi plums and mix this with some of the salmon flake furikake - it made delicious onigiri, but the flakes don't clump in the way that bonito shavings do when mixed with ume, so ume-blended salmon flakes make very tasty furikake in their own right.

This morning, I folded some into an omelet. Also very good.

Thank you again, Hiroyuki . I would never have considered the possibility of making this at all if I hadn't tried your recipe first.

----

* I'll try adding another spoon of mirin next time to better approximate the golden 1:1 mirin:soy sauce ratio.


Edited by MoGa (log)

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Another big thank you to you, MoGa! :smile::smile:

And, thanks for sharing your great experiments.

Here are some comments on my past experiences:

I have found that my furikake recipe doesn't work for canned tuna. The resulting furikake just doesn't taste good. I prefer simply draining the canned tuna, putting it on top of hot rice, and pouring some soy sauce. A very easy lunch.

My furikake recipe doesn't work for salmon, either. I prefer simply heating and drying unsalted salmon (not canned) in a frying pan with a spatula, with some sake added, and seasoning it very lightly with salt. When I have it with rice, I pour some soy sauce on it for flavoring.

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I'm interested in trying Hiroyuki's "magic furikake," but I have a question about the recipe: where it says "3 cans of mackerel," how big are the cans? The only canned mackerel I can get around here is 425g per can, so three of those would make a lot of furikake! Can someone help?


Matthew Kayahara

Kayahara.ca

@mtkayahara

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