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Akiko

Furikake

106 posts in this topic

I have checked the link, but no clue.

EDIT:

Is there anybody who reads Chinese? How do you say food additive in Chinese??


Edited by Hiroyuki (log)

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I find it hard to believe there are no additives or preservatives of any kind, does it have a really short shelf life?

I wonder if Taiwan has different laws regarding labeling....


<p><strong>Kristin Wagner</strong>, aka "torakris"

Manager, Membership

<a class="bbc_email" href="mailto:kwagner@egstaff.org" title="E-mail Link">kwagner@egstaff.org</a></p>

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Talking of shelf life, how long does it last if unopened? I bought several jars a few years back and a couple of them are still untouched.

A friend introduced me to furikake ramen noodles. Not bad at all.


The human mouth is called a pie hole. The human being is called a couch potato... They drive the food, they wear the food... That keeps the food hot, that keeps the food cold. That is the altar where they worship the food, that's what they eat when they've eaten too much food, that gets rid of the guilt triggered by eating more food. Food, food, food... Over the Hedge

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Different furikake products have different shelf lives: Some six months and others one year. I would recommend that you put them in the freezer.

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There are those weeks when cash is non-exsistent. That means lots of canned tuna and rice and bean sprouts. Furikake makes canned tuna taste like an extra-special exotic meal. I add the Furikake along with saracha (sp?) chili sauce and whatever else tickles my fancy.

Yes, agreed about furikake's powers of turning slim pickings into a banquet.

One of my favorite breakfasts or light dinner is miso soup, onigiri with furikake, cubes of tofu with ponzu and furikake, tsukemono and green tea.

Sometimes I'll just make maki rolls with rice and a furikake filling if I'm especially craving the taste and want a snack. Have to make sure to stay hydrated afterwards though, the salt and dehydration headache can be unpleasant!

My favorite flavors are wasabi and bonito.

Pat


"I... like... FOOD!" -Red Valkyrie, Gauntlet Legends-

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I brought nori and egg yolk furikake for lunch on Friday. My new students just about freaked out. It was the perfect lunch that took no thought because I had the rice, nori and furikake in my classroom.

Between the furikake and the nori they now think I am compeltely nuts. Wait until I bring in some natto :smile:


Edited by hillvalley (log)

True Heroism is remarkably sober, very undramatic.

It is not the urge to surpass all others at whatever cost,

but the urge to serve others at whatever cost. -Arthur Ashe

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did you share it? :biggrin:


<p><strong>Kristin Wagner</strong>, aka "torakris"

Manager, Membership

<a class="bbc_email" href="mailto:kwagner@egstaff.org" title="E-mail Link">kwagner@egstaff.org</a></p>

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Dipping roasted mochi in furikake. mmmmmm...


"Live every moment as if your hair were on fire" Zen Proverb

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My favorite supermarket has just become a more fun place to shop now that they have recently opened a special Japanese section. It just boggles the mind, so many wonderful looking things, but I don't read Japanese.

We saw these packets and can't wait to sprinkle over rice tonight.

Is this salmon furikake?

gallery_11814_92_1095429618.jpg

Confetti on rice!?!


Yetty CintaS

I am spaghetttti

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Is this salmon furikake? 

gallery_11814_92_1095429618.jpg

Confetti on rice!?!

The red one on the left is salmon, the blue one on the right is hon-katsuo (bonito)

Enjoy! and let us know what you think! :biggrin:


<p><strong>Kristin Wagner</strong>, aka "torakris"

Manager, Membership

<a class="bbc_email" href="mailto:kwagner@egstaff.org" title="E-mail Link">kwagner@egstaff.org</a></p>

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Note that they are otona no furikake (furikake for adults)! :biggrin:

No, no, don't get the wrong idea.

Furikake is often associated with children, and these products of Nagatanien are meant to dispel such a silly idea.

A wasabi flavored version is also available:

http://www.katagiri.com/ctlg/jpgf/i/i0201.htm

The mini versions (two types) offer more flavors:

http://www.katagiri.com/ctlg/jpgf/i/i0204.htm

Hope you can get them at your favorite supermarket.

Nagatanien's page on furikake:

http://www.nagatanien.co.jp/shouhin/index.html

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My version is also a wet version.  But it lasts for ten days or longer.  (Put it in the refrigerator, of course.)

***Maho no furikake (magic furikake) ***

(Sounds silly?)

Ingredients:

1.  Mackerel can, boiled plain (mizuni):  3 (not shown in the photo)

2.  Soy source:  6 tablespoons.  (I don't have a measuring spoon.  Just the large spoon in the picture.)

3.  Mirin-fu seasoner:  6 tablespoons (same volume as soy source)  (I don't use hon mirin.  Mirin-fu is enough for me.)

4.  Pepper

5.  Sesame seeds

How to make:

0.  Measure and mix soy source and mirin in a container.

1.  Open the 3 cans, drain, and put the mackerel into the nonstick frying pan.

2.  Add pepper and sesame seeds.  (I can't say how much; just as much as you like).

3.  Put the pan on the stove, turn on the gas, and smash the mackerel.  (I use a bamboo spatula. See photo)  Continue to smash until the mackerel nearly dries out (but still wet).  This will take about 5 minutes or so.

4.  Put the mix of soy source and mirin, and mix well until nearly dry (but still wet).  This will take about 2 minutes or so.

And the result is this:

Whenever I have little appetite, a munch or two of rice with this furikake makes me work up my appetite in no time.  It's true.  That's why I call it maho no furikake, or magic furikake.  It has the same effect on my wife and children, too.

i testify that this recipe is simple and tasty. it lives up to its name... thanks for sharing!

"Bibimbap shappdy wappdy wap." - Jinmyo

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i testify that this recipe is simple and tasty.  it lives up to its name...  thanks for sharing!

Thank you for trying my recipe, melonpan. This furikake is one of my favorite breakfast okazu (side dishes). Why don't you modify my recipe to suit your Korean taste and post it here?

I always keep the furikake in the refrigerator:

gallery_16375_5_1098071607.jpg

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Hiroyuki,

How long can you keep it for ?


<p><strong>Kristin Wagner</strong>, aka "torakris"

Manager, Membership

<a class="bbc_email" href="mailto:kwagner@egstaff.org" title="E-mail Link">kwagner@egstaff.org</a></p>

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I can assure you that it keeps for ten days or longer, but I am not sure whether it keeps for two weeks or longer, as we always finish it off by that time!

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Are you curious to know who is the originator of furikake? Here is an answer.

It was known that there were three possible originators of furikake, each in Tokyo, Hiroshima, and Kumamoto. But, at the general assembly of the Zenkoku Furikake Kyokai (National Furikake Association) held in 1994, Suekichi Yoshimaru of Futaba in Kumamoto was unanimously acknowledged as the originator of furikake.

From here:

http://www.mishima.co.jp/kusunoki/root.html

(Japanese only)

Scroll down, and you can see photos of the man and Japan's first furikake, Gohan no Tomo (Rice's Friend).

Website of Futaba:

http://www.gohannotomo.co.jp/index.html

(Japanese only)

Gohan no Tomo is produced by Futaba even today.

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I keep a can of Furikake at my desk here at work. *grabs can*

Katsuo Fumi Furikake - Bonito Flavor.

This is a great invention! Luv the stuff.

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Anyone else out there learn the "proper" way to shake the furikake onto your rice?

My husband taught this to my children, you hold the furikake packet (or jar) in one hand over the rice and gently tap the wrist  with your other hand.

I suppose my furious shaking over my bowl of rice is noooot so proper? :biggrin:

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Anyone else out there learn the "proper" way to shake the furikake onto your rice?

My husband taught this to my children, you hold the furikake packet (or jar) in one hand over the rice and gently tap the wrist  with your other hand.

I suppose my furious shaking over my bowl of rice is noooot so proper? :biggrin:

well if no one is looking.... :biggrin:


<p><strong>Kristin Wagner</strong>, aka "torakris"

Manager, Membership

<a class="bbc_email" href="mailto:kwagner@egstaff.org" title="E-mail Link">kwagner@egstaff.org</a></p>

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on my trip to the supermarket this morning I picked up 3 new packs of furikake, they cost 128 yen ($1.25) a piece.

gallery_6134_549_1105860843.jpg

L to R

wakame (seaweed)-oyako tara (oyako meaning parent and child, this is a combination of tara, cod in English, and tarako, the cod eggs)

tai (sea bream)-yuzu koshou (a mixture of yuzu and green chiles)

chirimen (baby sardines)- sanshou (Japanese prickly ash)


<p><strong>Kristin Wagner</strong>, aka "torakris"

Manager, Membership

<a class="bbc_email" href="mailto:kwagner@egstaff.org" title="E-mail Link">kwagner@egstaff.org</a></p>

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Anyone else out there learn the "proper" way to shake the furikake onto your rice?

My husband taught this to my children, you hold the furikake packet (or jar) in one hand over the rice and gently tap the wrist  with your other hand.

I suppose my furious shaking over my bowl of rice is noooot so proper? :biggrin:

well if no one is looking.... :biggrin:

Good to know! Lord knows I don't want to get my chopsticks tangled up. :biggrin:

Oh, one time I got this great furikake with Ding Dong (big blue cartoon character) on the package. Quite tasty. I'm sure I purchased something intended for kids but nevertheless, it was good.

Can you mix furikake and ikura on rice? Is that a typical Japanese rice topping?

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Can you mix furikake and ikura on rice?  Is that a typical Japanese rice topping?

If you live in Hawaii you can.... :biggrin:

when I lived in Hawaii, people put furikake on everything!

I have never seen that particular combination in Japan, or anywhere for that matter, but it doesn't mean you can't do it.

If it tastes good..... :biggrin:


<p><strong>Kristin Wagner</strong>, aka "torakris"

Manager, Membership

<a class="bbc_email" href="mailto:kwagner@egstaff.org" title="E-mail Link">kwagner@egstaff.org</a></p>

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I had known about gomashio ever since a brief flirtation with macrobiotics back in my 20s, and about furikake in general from readings here and there (including here on eGullet), but it wasn't until the other day that I picked up a jar for myself. Major yum! I can see myself eating a ton of this stuff without batting an eye. I've put it on brown rice and on garbanzo beans as well as on plain white rice, all to great effect.

The variety I got is Katsuo Mirin, made by Mishima/Shirakiku (for what it's worth, while the ingredient list is not all that short, the most artificial-ish ingredient of the lot is caramel coloring--the diet pop I'm currently drinking is much worse :biggrin: ).

My local 99 Ranch Asian market had a couple different brands in a variety of flavors, some looking relatively staid, some containing multi-colored candy-looking bits which I assumed were aimed more at kids. I get the impression that manufacturers just keep on inventing new and different flavors of furikaki, of varying degrees of inventiveness, like American breakfast cereals--would that be a fair comparison? (Given that there are also some cereals loaded with wacky-colored bits to entertain the kiddies, and other more sobersided varieties aimed more at adults). Are there some furikake combinations that are considered "classic" and/or traditional?

Also, what's considered a typical traditional serving amount of this stuff? I've read through the thread and seen that some people happily go ga-ga with it; but noting the Japanese preference for smaller food portions than we tend to consume in America, I'm assuming that the Japanese way with this stuff is similarly (relatively) restrained. Correct assumption or not?

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I'm assuming that the Japanese way with this stuff is similarly (relatively) restrained. Correct assumption or not?

It depends on how strongly flavoured (salty/sour) the furikake is. However, the portions in the photos posted by Torakris a few posts up are way overboard, for obvious commercial reasons.

I think the general idea is for the furikake to enhance and supplement the flavour of the rice, but not overpower it.

Around our house, Yukari (shiso-flavoured) furikake gets a lot of mileage.


Edited by sanrensho (log)

Baker of "impaired" cakes...

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