Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Lunch 2024


liuzhou

Recommended Posts

On 4/9/2024 at 5:29 PM, MaryIsobel said:

I am really going to have to try grits one of these days. 64 years old and have never had them. Don't even know if they are available in these parts although almost everything is available online now...

 

 

My first experience with grits was on a family road trip somewhere in the southern US when I was a kid. The previous day, I'd ordered hush puppies and was rewarded, not with a shoe, but cute little deep fried balls of deliciousness. This emboldened me to try another unfamiliar corn product, grits.  I was presented a little bowl of something that looked like cream of wheat with a big pat of margarine sitting on top but not melting at all.  I didn't try them again until Vivian Howard and her Deep Run Roots convinced me to give them another try and I've been a fan ever since.  

If you decide to try them, see if you can get something stone ground. I order them from Marsh Hen Mill but I don't know if they ship to Canada.  Anson Mills is another good brand. 

 

On to today's lunch, a shrimp roll with yuzu kosho mayo from The Global Pantry Cookbook,  using the little Oregon bay shrimp I got in this week's fish share.

D14439A3-F419-43C2-AEFA-08F19C01F028_1_201_a.thumb.jpeg.402c54e17cfd2ae5da3fe496609d1c64.jpeg

  • Like 11
  • Delicious 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Another vote for Marsh Hen Mill (aka Geechie Boy) grits. Both yellow and white are equally good; the white is a little more delicate in taste. Here's how I make my grits, and I have no idea where I got the recipe from, although I know I've tweaked it.

 

Bring 4.5 cups of water to a boil. Add a big pat of butter and a tsp or salt. Then incorporate one cup of grits, gradually, letting it sift through your fingers. Stir well and cook very low for about fifteen minutes, stirring to make sure it doesn't clump or stick to the bottom. Heat up a. cup of milk meanwhile. After the first fifteen minutes add 1/2 cup of the milk. Continue to cook, stirring, on very low heat, ten minutes. Then add the rest of the milk and continue cooking very slowly about 20 or 25 minutes, stirring, especially toward the end.. When done add in a knob of butter and some dairy of your choice. I like to add a dollop of creme fraiche. For cheesy grits add Oaxaca or cheddar or cheese of your choice, amount also to taste. 

 

Eat it right away, adding more butter and salt as desired. Or pour into a mold so the grits are about 1/2 to 3/4 inch thick and smooth the surface best as you can. This will keep refrigerated and can then be cut into slabs and sautéed in oil, butter or whatever you like.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've never had grits however I've eaten plenty of polenta (both as a base for osso bucco or lamb shanks and leftovers exactly how @Katie Meadow describes).

If anyone has had both is there a difference?

I have to admit I can't hear the word grits without bringing Joe Pesci to mind.

 

 

  • Like 1

'A drink to the livin', a toast to the dead' Gordon Lightfoot

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, Senior Sea Kayaker said:

I've never had grits however I've eaten plenty of polenta (both as a base for osso bucco or lamb shanks and leftovers exactly how @Katie Meadow describes).

If anyone has had both is there a difference?

I have to admit I can't hear the word grits without bringing Joe Pesci to mind.

 

 

Definitions of grits vs polenta are ofter murky or confusing, or just wrong. I'm still not totally clear. Some say that grits are made from dent corn while polenta is made from flint corn. In my experience polenta is typically made from yellow corn and is usually a fine grind, making it smoother. Corn for grits can be white or yellow and is usually a coarser grind, giving the dish a more toothy bite. White grits are a little more delicate in taste, I think. That said I prefer the white, but my husband prefers the yellow. Actually I love them both. Get grits milled fresh as possible; my source is Marsh Hen Mill, on Edista Island on the low country. The couple who owns it inherited or acquired an old mill and ship quickly. You could certainly buy traditionally coarser grits and grind them further if you prefer a fine grind. My unverified thought is that polenta from Italy has been longer on the shelf. I wouldn't hesitate to use grits in place of an Italian dish that calls for polenta, but that's really because grits is what I stock at home. Can be kept frozen. I buy several bags and keep one in the fridge, but I don't think it hurts to be used straight from the freezer. 

  • Like 3
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The Whole Turnip Pasta from Tenderheart. Half of the turnip greens are blitzed into a bright pistachio pesto and the other half are sautéed and tossed with the pasta along with the pan browned, then steamed turnip roots.

5B592529-A866-4893-A5CA-F001EB017F0C_1_201_a.thumb.jpeg.51a5bb6922b2df61e4f29d0a90a89ae7.jpeg

At first bite, I thought this was just OK but it really grew on me and I'd absolutely make it again. As written, and to my taste, this needs a hit of acid to brighten and contrast with the sweetness of the cooked turnip and bitterness of the greens.  I added a squeeze of fresh lemon juice to the pesto and a sprinkle of diced preserved lemon rind to the finished dish and was happy with that. I think crumbled feta would also work. The crunch from the roasted pistachios is key but another crunchy ingredient could fill in. 
I always use 2 oz of pasta/serving rather than the 4 oz in the recipe and thought this was good as a vegetarian main but one could easily add shrimp, chicken or salmon, either to the dish or alongside.

  • Like 9
Link to comment
Share on other sites

This Sunday lunch was beef curry made by husband. IF we have a sit down Sunday lunch it is usually either a curry or a roast. He added coconut milk to a Rogan Josh beef curry and it was creamy and delicious. 
 

2BCAE9EF-D00C-4900-8142-DEB26C0254E4.jpeg.926aab79a92aa7862b01827ad3ab08b2.jpeg
 

  • Like 4
  • Delicious 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Back from Athens. Life is so different only 3 hours (by air) away.


Cold seafood is my favourite kind of food.
K0zpuBQJ_o.jpg

 

"Pointed cabbage", raw, with some kalamata olive brine in it.
v71pEZ5G_o.jpg

 

Pumpernickel and seeded sourdough bread
ottZpcey_o.jpg
-------------------

 

Prawns in fermented bean curd sauce. (Mashed bean curd, some sugar, water etc)
symwlGi8_o.jpg

 

Char siu (from Asian supermarket, made on the premises)
k4kXo96p_o.jpg

 

"Fried rice" (for someone else). Leftover rice, eggs, Amami grain miso and some crispy bits of Speck.
G8LEsgCU_o.jpg

 

Noodles with prawn roe (for myself)
7YYaDtXJ_o.jpg

 

Happy to be cooking and eating my own food again!
92W8LHNP_o.jpg
 

  • Like 9
  • Delicious 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Harissa tofu bowl with farro from The Global Pantry Cookbook

E62720F9-7DE6-4FEE-AA66-A6C67D332753_1_201_a.thumb.jpeg.aeb86d9f7a97da3a4d3ed0e14367e848.jpeg

This cookbook is about cooking with "global" ingredients in different ways, using those ingredients purchased for one cookbook or recipe.  I'm generally pleased with the recipes and the results but some of the recipe names irritate me.  For example, this one is called Virtuous Vegan Harissa Tofu Bowl with Farro.  Others use unnecessary superlatives - "creamiest" is included in the recipe name for grits, hummus and a curry.  Obviously, I'm trying to get over it 🙃

  • Like 6
  • Delicious 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

We're on the road home. Today is our 37th anniversary. For lunch we stopped in Seligman AZ. Little did I know there's a stretch of road leading off the main highway that is dedicated to preserving some of the places or at least the vibe of old Route 66, parts of which run parallel to I 40. We ate at The Roadkill Cafe/OK Saloon. Another discovery: Arizona isn't noted for rest stops, so really the idea was to order something small and use the bathroom. But it was quirky and everyone was so nice we decided to have an early lunch. My husband very much liked his burger (we rarely eat beef) and for a celebratory dessert we had Key Lime Pie. There was a mile high of whipped cream on top, which I scraped off most of, and wonder of wonders the pie itself was excellent. And I'm a harsh critic when it comes to pie. There was a dazzling round glass tower displaying the pies, and there were at least ten different kinds. So, a great anniversary lunch. Oh, and of course the motto of the Roadkill Cafe is "You kill it we grill it." There was an elk burger on the menu (and the menu itself is a hilarious work of literature) but we passed on that.

  

  • Like 7
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I wanted to thank you @blue_dolphin for the times you have mentioned in reference to the meal you’ve made “The Global Pantry Cookbook”. I finally looked it up ( takes me awhile lol) and was available through Amazon. Sometimes, some books and products aren’t available here in Australia. So I got it through Kindle and it’s a terrific read as well as a recipe informer despite its little quirks. I do have most ‘global’ things that are mentioned in my pantry but we will have to differ on kimchi, maybe I’ve just had bad ones.

 

 The other book you mention Tenderheart, well I’ll explore that another time. I like reading recipes but not so good at following them, using them more as a reference to the ingredients I have on hand. Occasionally I’ll shop specifically for ingredients for a particular recipe. 

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

42 minutes ago, Neely said:

I wanted to thank you @blue_dolphin for the times you have mentioned in reference to the meal you’ve made “The Global Pantry Cookbook”. I finally looked it up ( takes me awhile lol) and was available through Amazon. Sometimes, some books and products aren’t available here in Australia. So I got it through Kindle and it’s a terrific read as well as a recipe informer despite its little quirks. I do have most ‘global’ things that are mentioned in my pantry but we will have to differ on kimchi, maybe I’ve just had bad ones.

 

 The other book you mention Tenderheart, well I’ll explore that another time. I like reading recipes but not so good at following them, using them more as a reference to the ingredients I have on hand. Occasionally I’ll shop specifically for ingredients for a particular recipe. 

I hope you like it. I wasn’t planning to get the book but the shrimp and coconut grits made me buy it. Not everything has been perfect but it’s earned a spot on my bookshelf!  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I was kinda hungry because I just had a cup of coffee and a Biscoff for breakfast and I got lovely fresh mussels in my fish share but for some reason I wasn't in a mussel mood so tuna salad in a brioche bun:

4AA1F6D2-451D-457B-B55E-37E297CAB015_1_201_a.thumb.jpeg.f5b3cb1fe8ef9b5f65ddfb761f25835b.jpeg

This was a standard Friday cafeteria lunch when I was a kid.  It appeared on the menu as "Tuna Boats"

Mussels to be dealt with later....

  • Like 4
  • Delicious 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

_20240418232211.thumb.jpg.bcab8fa1ce2cd4d272a9b923e397fc75.jpg

 

Lunch was soup. Clams in a shrimp shell stock with mustard greens. should have bought spinach and squid then I could have made shrimp shell stock squid spinach soup with clams. Only ever make that at home; you'll never be able to say it to a waiter.

 

 

  • Like 5
  • Haha 3

...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

A terrible thing is ignorance, the source of endless human woes, spreading a mist over facts, obscuring truth, and casting a gloom upon the individual life. - Lucian of Samosata (born 120, died after 180 CE)

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Roasted Cauliflower Salad with Quick-Pickled Raisins from The Global Pantry Cookbook

8023C085-F147-463C-B344-784C6D1A20EE_1_201_a.thumb.jpeg.8fe9947b469f6afbc6b7a48ae48f8afe.jpeg

The cauliflower and onion slices get tossed with olive oil and ras el hanout and roasted. The raisins are microwaved for a minute in a flavorful brine that's supposed to be made with Banyuls vinegar. I had none and used an aged Pedro Ximenez sherry vinegar instead. 

I liked this but would probably do something other than turn it into a salad. 

  • Like 5
  • Delicious 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

We went for a drive to scout out a potential camping spot and ended up for lunch at a small town burger place that was stellar. Bacon cheeseburger and fries for him, avocado bacon cheeseburger and onion rings for for me. Plus a strawberry shake. We took a lot home including half the shake!


Bonus pics of some of the beautiful spring foliage we’re getting. Beautiful day for a drive.

 

IMG_1469.jpeg

IMG_1463.jpeg

IMG_1464.jpeg

  • Like 8
  • Thanks 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Shrimp Scampi Vermicelli with Garlicky Miso Butter from The Global Pantry Cookbook

AE8A66D7-DE72-4BEF-9D94-0A651CEDA204_1_201_a.thumb.jpeg.117f57bb03a35bba8a4152fb23c89903.jpeg

This is a nice quick pasta.  The recipe calls for 4 oz pasta/serving.  I used 2 oz pasta + 3 oz sugar snap peas + 1.5 oz red bell pepper. 

  • Like 10
  • Delicious 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

A quick lunch of pickled herring. The best thing about this lunch is that the pomegranate is off my own baby tree… I had three this year. 495FAC43-CCA2-48A7-B315-33AE72269C2E.jpeg.0508078d51dfda654d08b5f6a836897a.jpeg

  • Like 10
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Mushrooms
pFEU0TI9_o.jpg


3hiUF976_o.jpg


-------- #2 ---------
Baked ricotta
O4xvzQYy_o.jpg

 

More mushrooms
okOWlpV4_o.jpg

 

Sicilian-inspired. Pasta with ricotta (and olive oil. Chopped pistachios would be nice, of course). Bucatini with parsley and raw garlic. I add a few dollops of ricotta to the pasta as I eat but Sicilians mix plain ricotta with olive oil and stir into the pasta.  6DSTdZnL_o.jpg
-------- #3 ---------

 

I rarely buy rice, let alone this much. (It's for someone else, though.)
4WKAvFia_o.jpg

 

"Pointed cabbage"
bRuqnuPN_o.jpg

 

Miso soup with soft tofu and seaweed
JSxm5Y9o_o.jpg

 

Typical "neba-neba" (slimy food) ingredients.
P4Z765za_o.jpg

 

  • Like 10
  • Delicious 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

×
×
  • Create New...