Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Brownies – The Topic


Recommended Posts

Anyone interested in trying this recipe? (I haven't used it.) Makes quite a few brownies!

Here's a recipe from Michael Recchiuti in this month's "Food and Wine":

Quadruple chocolate brownies

2 1/2 cups unsalted butter

1 lb unsweetened chocolate

5 1/2 cups sugar

16 large eggs

2 tbsp vanilla extract

1 1/2 tsp kosher salt

3 3/4 cups AP flour

1/2 lb bittersweet chocolate, chopped

1/2 lb white chocolate, chopped

1/2 lb milk chocolate, chopped

Preheat oven to 300F. Prepare two 9x13" pans. Melt unsweetened chocolate. In a large bowl, whisk eggs with sugar, vanilla, and salt. Add the melted chocolate to the egg mixture. Add the flour. Add 5 oz of each of the chopped chocolates. Spread batter in prepared pans.

Melt remaining chopped chocolate, put in separate bowls. Drizzle the chocolate on top of the batter, use a knife to create marble effect. Bake 35 minutes.

In an October 2004 edition of the LA Times, a reader asked for the recipe for the brownies the Recchiuti's sell at the San Francisco Ferry Building. This recipe is much simpler than the Quadruple version and makes a smaller batch; it's for a 9-inch square pan. Here are the ingredients:

"Recchiuti Fudgy Brownies"

servings: 12 to 16

1 cup (2 sticks) softened butter

5 ounces top-quality unsweetened chocolate, coarsely chopped (such as 100% cacao Valrhona Etienne Guittard Artisan line, or 99% cacao Scharffen Berger)

2 cups sugar

4 eggs

1 1/2 teaspoons salt

1 cup plus 2 tablespoons flour, sifted

1 cup top-quality semisweet (such as Scharffen Berger 62%) chocolate, cut into chunks (5 ounces) [fold in after brownies are mixed]

High-quality cocoa powder [for sprinkling after brownies cool]

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...

I had such good luck with asking for advice from egulleteers for Chewy Peanut butter cookies and Chew Chocolate Chip cookies before Christmas, that I thought I'd ask again. I am wild about chewy brownies (I am seeing a pattern here). So much so that I have considered cooking them in tube pans so that I have nothing but edge pieces :raz: ! Anyway, I looked at the brownie threadand I am giving browniebakers recipe a try. They sound like what I want.

Here's my question. I heard on another board that the larger the pan, the chewier the brownies. So, if instead of using a 8x8 pan, I use a 9x9 pan (or larger), I will get super chewy brownies. Does this make sense to the bakers here?? Thanks!

Link to post
Share on other sites
I had such good luck with asking for advice from egulleteers for Chewy Peanut butter cookies and Chew Chocolate Chip cookies before Christmas, that I thought I'd ask again.  I am wild about chewy brownies (I am seeing a pattern here).  So much so that I have considered cooking them in tube pans so that I have nothing but edge pieces  :raz: !  Anyway, I looked at the brownie threadand I am giving browniebakers recipe a try.  They sound like what I want. 

Here's my question.  I heard on another board that the larger the pan, the chewier the brownies.  So, if instead of using a 8x8 pan, I use a 9x9 pan (or larger), I will get super chewy brownies.  Does this make sense to the bakers here??  Thanks!

The chewiness of brownies is dependent upon a complicated relationship between surface area of pan, depth of mixture, oven temperatue, baking time, and even the material and color of the pan. Lots of experimenting is called for. (I find there are always plenty of volunteers to teste even your less than successful brownies!) :wink:

Using one less egg than called for in the recipe will make any brownie chewier.

Oddly. GF and her daughter both dislike brownie edges, and will cut pieces out from the center of the pan! :shock:

SB (if that ain't maddening) :angry:

Link to post
Share on other sites

Ha, and I was just going to ask, "what are the factors that lend chewiness to a brownie?" As in, is there a good thing to look for in a recipe that will give a hint?

I like the Fantasy Brownies form Lora Brody's "Basic Baking" for flavor, and it does have a nice texture, but if it were just a little more chewy, it would be perfect.

"Los Angeles is the only city in the world where there are two separate lines at holy communion. One line is for the regular body of Christ. One line is for the fat-free body of Christ. Our Lady of Malibu Beach serves a great free-range body of Christ over angel-hair pasta."

-Lea de Laria

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not sure but when it comes to cookies, lessening an egg white (and using just the yolk) of one of those required eggs make them chewier. I guess, you can also experiment with the baking time as most "well-done" brownies tend to be crispier/harder than fudgy and chewy.

I have a confession to make. Even though I've already baked about a dozen batches of brownies... I've never made one with real chocolate. *gasp*

What would be the difference of recipes that use cocoa powder and then, melted chocolate?

I am in the process of fulfilling a dream, one that involves a huge stainless kitchen, heavenly desserts and lots of happy sweet-toothed people.
Link to post
Share on other sites
Here's a pan that is all edges.  Baker's Edge  I haven't followed up to see whether he's marketing it nationally, after having won the $25,000 prize, but you might want to check it out.

I emailed that kid about his pan - haven't heard back yet. I really want one of those pans :wub: ! Thanks for the link!

Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been on a quest for the One True Brownie recipe for a while. Of course, everyone's OTB is different, but for me, it's creamy and fudgy in the middle, with a crisp crust.

I definitely agree that Medrich's Steve Ritual is the way to go to help in that direction. But the best brownie recipe I've tried to date is this one (plus the Steve Ritual, of course):

Andrew's Brownies

For the peppermint ones, I made this recipe for my Xmas cookie boxes and got huge raves. They are pretty darn good, if a bit more labor intensive than the York's Peppermint Patty method:

Grasshopper Squares

After read through all this, I'm looking forward to trying Julia's recipe to see if it's the OTB recipe!

Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive and well preserved body...but rather to skid in sideways, chocolate in one hand, wine in the other, body thoroughly used up, totally worn out and screaming "WOO HOO what a ride!"
Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm not sure but when it comes to cookies, lessening an egg white (and using just the yolk) of one of those required eggs make them chewier. I guess, you can also experiment with the baking time as most "well-done" brownies tend to be crispier/harder than fudgy and chewy.

I have a confession to make. Even though I've already baked about a dozen batches of brownies... I've never made one with real chocolate. *gasp*

What would be the difference of recipes that use cocoa powder and then, melted chocolate?

My usual recipe for brownies is cocoa powder based, using Hershey's cocoa. Some cocoa powders contain a great deal of fat, but the Hershey's is around 1%. I'd tend to describe brownies as having cakey (visible crumb, may crumble a bit, cake or bread like mouth feel), chewy (may or may not have visible crumb, tends not to crumble, mouth feel related to taffy) or fudgy (minimal visible crumb, may flake, fudge candy-like mouth feel) textures. If I follow the recipe as written, I end up with a texture between cakey and chewy, with the edges being crisp. This is good, because I prefer that texture :). The flavor is chocolatey, but definitely leaning towards milk chocolate, which suits my taste as well. I like milk chocolate best. I always double the recipe and bake in a 9*13 baking dish. They're pretty much impossible to screw up, even if you measure the ingredients rather than weighing them.

I also do a more intense version, based on baking chocolate and cocoa powder. I haven't settled on a preferred baking chocolate as yet. Where the cocoa based recipe has you melt the butter, it's pretty easy to melt the butter and 2 oz of baking chocolate. This makes the recipe a lot more uncertain, and I haven't pinned down why (tho I strongly suspect it has to do with overheating the butter and chocolate mixture). However, when it works, you get a much deeper, dark chocolate leaning brownie for only a small increase in the fuss. When it doesn't work, you get an inedible chocolate brick :-/.

I've done melted chocolate only brownies, and I feel they're far too dependent on the quality and kind of chocolate used, and the techniques used to get the chocolate into a form where it can become part of the batter. If you use a good chocolate, you get a good chocolate flavor. If you use an inferior chocolate, you don't get a good chocolate flavor. If your technique is poor, you end up with lousy brownies. My chocolate handling is often poor, so I tend to end up with lousy chocolate based brownies. Someone who is better with chocolate would of course have different results. Any fool can handle cocoa powder and get an edible result (and a chocolate fix!). That's what's kept me going with making brownies, and I'm learning to handle chocolate better, one batch at a time.

Emily

Link to post
Share on other sites

I can't wait to try Alton's cocoa recipe - I have loved Ina's "outrageous" formulation previously but that much butter and sugar.... eesh.

As a side question, I made another batch of the Outrageous brownies today (to take to a baby shower.... hehe), and I had some weird results.

Previously I had baked in a glass dish and they turned out great. This time was a 9x13 metal pan (with 1/2 of the standard recipe).

As I was cooling the warm choc mixture to room temp, I noticed something that hadn't happened before: it very nearly solidified, like a ganache. I seem to recall that it stayed pretty liquid on other occasions.

Anyway, after baking, everything was fine, but when I took the brownies out of the pan and started cutting, there was a thin layer of congealed pure butter on the bottom of the pan and on the bottom of the brownies! :hmmm:

Still tasty as all heck, but definitely a little strange looking. Does anyone think that this is related to the "ganache" solidification of the chocolate goo?

For reference to the recipe and instructions, here's a FTV link.

Thanks!

Andrea

http://tenacity.net

"You can't taste the beauty and energy of the Earth in a Twinkie." - Astrid Alauda

---------------------------------------------------------------------

Food Lovers' Guide to Santa Fe, Albuquerque & Taos: OMG I wrote a book. Woo!

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

Just got a new Baker's Catalogue from King Arthur and they are selling the Baker's Edge pan. Unfortunately their website is having technical problems so I can't find it online, but it's item number 5751, priced at #36.95. I won't be trying it since I don't prefer edge pieces, but it's an excellent idea for those who do.

Hungry Monkey May 2009
Link to post
Share on other sites
Just got a new Baker's Catalogue from King Arthur and they are selling the Baker's Edge pan. Unfortunately their website is having technical problems so I can't find it online, but it's item number 5751, priced at #36.95. I won't be trying it since I don't prefer edge pieces, but it's an excellent idea for those who do.

I just ordered this. Baker's Edge Pan. I think it is pretty impressive that it made the King Arthur catalog. I will report back as soon as I get it and try it out.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

Just skimmed through the thread and I didn't see any mention of Peanut Butter Brownies. Does anyone have a good recipe? I'm thinking of trying the one from the latest Martha Stewart Holiday Cookies magazine. Peanut butter filling is swirled into the brownie batter.

Last weekend I made the Chocolate Chip Cookie-Brownie Double-Deckers from the book The Weekend Baker. When I first saw this recipe I knew I had to try it, and they were very moist and delicious. Each batter is easy to make (made with melted butter, batter mixed in the pot), then layered in a 9x13 pan.

Hungry Monkey May 2009
Link to post
Share on other sites
I have several thousand brownie recipes in books devoted to them, in other cookie books, in general cookbooks, in folders of clippings from magazines and newspapers, in my personal file, in vintage advertising ephemera and even in a NARAL program to which Katherine Hepburn donated her personal recipe. With all that, mamster gave me the last recipe needed after trying Alice Medrich's version from her 1999 book Cookies and Brownies. The secret is to put the hot out of the oven brownies into a pan of ice water to stop the baking. This creates a nice outer crust and a creamy middle. I guess, you can use this technique for any recipe with more than 1/2 cup of flour. If you want any outre recipes, just ask.

Bump.

I read about this on a fellow foodbloggers site. These came out incredible( just make sure you dont use a glass baking dish). The brownies were so creamy inside. Everyone loved them. I'd reduce the sugar next time, they were a tad sweet. Anyone else try them?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you eGullet for this thread and in particular for Maida Heatter's Palm Beach Brownies!

That was one of my favourite dessert recipes ... I cut it out of a newspaper years ago, but when I moved house a couple of years ago, the clipping disappeared. I looked for it on the Net, but to no avail, despite it being quite distinctive.

I'm delighted to have it again.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Just got a new Baker's Catalogue from King Arthur and they are selling the Baker's Edge pan. Unfortunately their website is having technical problems so I can't find it online, but it's item number 5751, priced at #36.95. I won't be trying it since I don't prefer edge pieces, but it's an excellent idea for those who do.

I just ordered this. Baker's Edge Pan. I think it is pretty impressive that it made the King Arthur catalog. I will report back as soon as I get it and try it out.

Made the brownies for todays Super Bowl party. They were incredible. No middle pieces at all. Every brownie has at least two edges, some have THREE. :wub::wub::wub: I am in love with this pan.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 4 months later...

The pan looks great and I'd love to try it. Until now I've been doing my brownies in mini-muffin pans, very much more time-consuming and you have to really watch the baking time... but good for kids parties as they make exactly mouth-size morsels that have an all-round chewy edge.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 years later...

Hi everyone,

heres the deal. I thought it would make sense to create a post that seems i cannot find on this site. And that is Brownies. Our chewy gooey beloved friend that has so many different textures and flavors. I personally have made hundreds of different brownie recipes and yep have even tried to mold my own. But however to no avail. Here is what i am looking for. I want a brownie recipe that is more fudgy with a minute cakeness to it, but alot of chocolate- NO frostings or toppings. Just straight up chocolate. I like a crackly top to it and love it to be dense and thick. I am so sick of seeing brownies that are like 1/2 inch or inch thick. EWWWWWWWWWWWWW. Not for me. I want a brownie recipe for an 8 x 8 pan that when done fills the pan ....so what is that like 3 inches thick. I want everyone to post, post and post some more here with all your delicious knock you out of the park recipes. Only chocolate. Not fruit filled or cheesecake or anything else. ONLY CHOCOLATE recipes allowed please. thanks and please respond to all and lets help each other out to find and/or create the best of the best. Question is ....can it be done????? I will be waiting!!!!!

Link to post
Share on other sites

yep i see that man but heres the thing...all the people were allowed to add nuts and go with cheesecake and whatever they wanted...here only chocolate....NO NO NO nuts no cheesecake, no fruit, no funny stuff. ONLY chocolate. Besides alot of people are allergic to nuts...and yes they could just leave them out but this is not a point to ponder. Lets just do away from the getgo here. NO NUTS or anything that isnt chocolate. PERIOD. see the difference ! cool lets post people.

Link to post
Share on other sites

You can successfully double any brownie recipe to make it thicker, as long as you compensate for the thickness with time and temperature.

Since I am primarily a baker, I tend to stick with cake for my sculpted and novelty projects. But when the request came for a cheeseburger cake, I used a huge, triple batter brownie in a parchment collared and lined 10X3-inch round pan. It was about 2 inches thick, and took what seemed to be forever to bake. I had to turn the temp down to 300 degrees, to keep the edges from burning before the center was done. But when it was cut, it was exactly as a brownie should be - ever so slightly crisp on the edges, moist and chewy inside. The crinkled top had just the right bit of snap to it.

For scratch, it's Betty Crocker recipe - only a few ingredients, no leavening, butter for the fat content. I use Guittard or Ghirardelli chocolates, exclusively. Instead of nuts, I add a half-cup of chopped semi-sweet chocolate, or a quarter cup of chocolate syrup, just to make it even more fudgy. If you use the syrup, you have to bake longer to account for the extra liquid.

When I'm in a hurry, the boxed mix I turn to is Ghirardelli.

Theresa :biggrin:

"Nearly all men can stand adversity, but if you want to test a man's character, give him power."

- Abraham Lincoln

Link to post
Share on other sites

I suppose I get it but once there's a good fudgy recipe and a good cakey recipe (which already exist in the bake-off thread) I'm not sure where else you want to go with it. I'll still watch, eGulleters can be pretty creative within a narrow and strict framework as evidenced in challenges past.

It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...